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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2005
    Location
    Some where in the middle of nowhere.
    Posts
    3,614

    Default Farrier work and breeding stock.

    Got into a heated debate with a very good friend who shows APHA and QH shows frequently and also breeds a few so less then 5 mares a year. Her mares are kept up on limited rotational turn out just like the show horse's , blanketed and hooded , lights on the 9 yards including a 5 week farrier schedule for trims for her broodmares.

    First for a moment it made me feel like a bad broodie parent leaving mine to languish in big grass fields Having to deal with things like dirt and the embarrassment of winter coats and the occasional witches knot. But the none competing mares get done on an as needed and asscesment basis between 6-9wks depending on time of year. A few go longer and do just fine.

    What is the norm. I just can't believe for a second that those huge TB operations with a few hundred mares are bringing them in every 5 or 6 wks for trims.

    How often are you doing things like trims on pastured broodies?
    Last edited by Lynnwood; Jun. 17, 2011 at 04:53 PM.
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2006
    Location
    North Central Florida
    Posts
    1,380

    Default

    We stick to the 5 week schedule for all our horses- youngsters, broodmares and performance horses. alike.
    We have an outstanding farrier who keeps to a schedule and comes without anyone having to supervise him He does the mares and babies out in the pasture, with a leadline over their necks! Dare I say that it may be the only area in herd management where we can exercise control and predictability and so exult in our horses unchipped even hooves!
    Sakura Hill Farm
    Now on Facebook

    Young and developing horses for A-circuit jumper and hunter rings.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,765

    Default

    Pastured horses are moving around a lot more, more access to more abrasive footing in many cases, so may indeed need less frequent trimming (I'm assuming barefoot here).

    Where I boarded for years, a farrier came in every week, and did a rotation of horses. Some horses got done every 4 weeks, some 6,7,8, whatever they needed.

    A big operation just about has to have a farrier there on a weekly (or more often) basis do get everyone done in a decently timely manner.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2005
    Location
    Floral City , Fl.
    Posts
    4,238

    Default

    My farrier comes once a week. On our farm, broodmares are treated no differently than the show ponies. Usually they are done at 5-6 weeks. Once in awhile we bring one in to the barn and look and see it does not need to be done until the following week.

    I do know farms that trim their broodmares a few times a year.
    Sandy
    www.sugarbrook.com
    hunter/jumper ponies



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2010
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    No farrier in this town and the one that will drive this far will do 10 horses a trip...period. He will only go to one place and anyone with a horse scheduled from another location hauls to the one place he's going to be. Most of us have our broodmares out on desert ground which is either mostly sand and pretty abrasive or mostly clay and hard as a rock or a few have rocky soil....and most of us do our own trims with the farrier seeing the horses maybe once or twice a year. Most horses here go barefoot and stay worn pretty well...similar to the feral horses. If you want your horse shod then some of the ranches have someone that can do that but not a formal farrier.... usually one of the ranch hands that does theirs so will do an extra once in awhile if there's time. For a lot of horses the first time they have shoes on is if they go to a trainers place out of the area. I do my broodmares myself and they get done once or twice a year by the farrier if I can convince him to drive here....$200 for the drive plus $40/horse and he wants that 10 horse amount filled before he will drive up so $600/trip. Could get worse...he's getting a bit older and more creaky and is talking about no longer doing the drive which would leave us without one at all and having to haul 70+ miles to get to him if he stays in business. He is good, slow though, and as I said, getting creaky.
    Colored Cowhorse Ranch
    www.coloredcowhorseranch.com
    Northern NV



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2006
    Location
    Sunbury, NC
    Posts
    1,789

    Default

    Like others, we do ours as needed - some can go 7 or 8 weeks but most 5 to 6 weeks. Most of ours are out on big fields 24-7 so many wear very naturally. Due to the number we have and that we work so are only available in the evenings, the farrier is usually here every 2-3 weeks regardless so whoever needs it is added on easily. Of course they grow much faster in the spring and slower in the winter so we adjust as needed.
    Signature Sporthorses
    www.signaturesporthorses.com



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2011
    Posts
    591

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Pastured horses are moving around a lot more, more access to more abrasive footing in many cases, so may indeed need less frequent trimming (I'm assuming barefoot here).

    Where I boarded for years, a farrier came in every week, and did a rotation of horses. Some horses got done every 4 weeks, some 6,7,8, whatever they needed.

    A big operation just about has to have a farrier there on a weekly (or more often) basis do get everyone done in a decently timely manner.
    ditto on what she says. the majority of our broodmares get done anywhere between 6-8 weeks. thats not to say that if they need it sooner they dont get done i would just say that is about the norm.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2002
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    8,291

    Default

    Mine are done every five weeks. The ET facility that I use for surrogates does their girls on about a 6-7 week schedule. Here is FL we really can't let a horse go much longer. We have humidity and sand to deal with that causes chipping if they are left too long.



  9. #9

    Default

    They get done when they "need" it...that does not mean wait til they are curled up ;> but some horses just do better on their own schedules

    Tamara
    Production Acres,Pro A Welsh Cobs
    I am one of the last 210,000 remaining full time farmers in America.We feed the others.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2010
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tamara in TN View Post
    They get done when they "need" it...that does not mean wait til they are curled up ;> but some horses just do better on their own schedules

    Tamara
    Ready for flaming here but as an example I have a 3 year old colt leaving for a trainer in a couple weeks. Brought him in and rasped his feet a month ago...took off maybe 1/8 of an inch all around and a smidge more on toes and then "mustang rolled" his toes as well. Last time he was done...August. Feed are hard as rocks with big frog and hard soles. Expect, since in a pen now and softer soil/less movement, he'll have to get rasped again before leaving and will likely get shod once he's down there.
    Colored Cowhorse Ranch
    www.coloredcowhorseranch.com
    Northern NV



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2003
    Location
    MO
    Posts
    4,574

    Default

    Most of our horses, including the broodies, are on a 6 week schedule. The only exceptions are the recipient mares who are done as needed. Some of them need the 6 weeks, some can go 8-9.
    Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm."
    --Winston Churchill
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hills...h/112931293227
    www.HillsideHRanch.com



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2004
    Location
    Lancaster, PA, USA
    Posts
    7,578

    Default

    depends. Some of ours have great feet that wear evenly and can go quite a while. 2 TB mares and the filly of one of those mares have feet that are a little shelly and need to be done more often or they will start to flare or crack. Since we have 14 horses we have to split into 2 groups the farrier is here about once a month. Since he lives nearby if there is 1 horse with an issue that needs to be addressed between visits he can pop over.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2009
    Location
    Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    1,041

    Default

    My horses live our year 'round on good quality pasture - bone dry in the summer and a bit soggy in winter.

    The mares feet are only done when needed. One mare has a rasp across her feet every 3-4 weeks as they are prone to splitting if I'm not ultra vigilant. One gets a rasp over her feet every once in a while. She has feet like iron and they remain a lovely shape for months on end.

    All the others fit somewhere in between.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    3,247

    Default

    Our farrier is out at least 1 full day each week. We have between 25-40 horses. Lots are barefoot and only 1 has a full set of shoes.

    Here's our 'normal' routine -
    Week 1 - current foals (2011), 2010's and riding mares for trims
    Week 2 - youngstock - fillies & colts, plus the unstarted youngstock
    Week 3 - broodmares & stallion trims, retirees
    Week 4 - riding geldings & shod stallion(s), shod mares
    Week 5 - anything that got 'missed' or is in need sooner

    Weather sometimes impacts who gets done when (if it's 100*, we try to break it into 2 days for example) as does the 'who pulled a shoe last night?' factor...

    All the youngstock, the broodmares and the retirees are out 24/7. The shod horses have a slightly more strict turnout (days in the winter, nights in summer). There are some trims that have corrective things done on a different time frame. Also some shod horses need more time to grow between shoeings...so it varies.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2006
    Location
    Seville, FL
    Posts
    708

    Default

    Mine are on a 6 week schedule too -- but I only average 2-4 broodies per year, if this has any bearing.

    Sakura Hill -- I wonder if you are anywhere near me (Newberry, outside of Gainesville). I'd love a farrier who would come do the horses on his own, and out in the pasture! I dread farrier day only because I lose valuable time, when it already seems like I never have enough hours in the day. And mine are very good..... I kind of feel like I'm just 'standing around' when the farrier is here anyhow. If you are near me and have a farrier recommendation you can share, I'd love to hear it RiverOaksFarmFL@aol.com
    River Oaks Farm - home of the Elite Book Friesian Sporthorse Grand Prix dressage stallion Lexington - sire of four consecutive FSA National Inspection Champions. Endorsing the FSA.



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