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  1. #1
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    Apr. 22, 2006
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    Default Chiropractic mistake?

    I had my 22 yr old gelding done by a chiropractor who used a piece of wood & mallet. I stopped him after the first few hits but let him continue after some others in the barn (who were having theirs done also) and the chiro himself convinced me it would help. He has been off behind for the last 2 days since it was done and I am sick over it.I have used different chiros in the past but never had one use a mallet. Has anyone seen this before and did I cripple my boy? I am so upset & angry.Anyone have experience with this kind of thing?



  2. #2
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    Mar. 24, 2007
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    Default

    My chiro just uses her hand and the weight of her body to bump something into place ie the sternum would be one where she uses her whole body.

    Dalemma



  3. #3
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    Jun. 22, 2010
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    Default

    I've only had chiros use their hands - I do not think they would get the appropriate feel to know what moved without the use of their hands or body.



  4. #4
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    May. 14, 2009
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    Default

    I had one do it that way ONCE. Probably close to 15 yrs ago.
    From someone who is very well known and respected.
    Fortunately my horse didn't suffer any ill effects from it, but then & there lost all respect & decided to look elsewhere.



  5. #5
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    I've had some chiro's use their hands, some use mallets. My last chiro that I was using regularly (prior to her moving away ) rarely used a mallet but on the particularly difficult spots, she did use one. It was always gentle and never left me with any impression she was doing any damage (especially since the results were fantastic ) - she would check both prior and after, with her hands... it was just the actual moving part she needed help with at times. I've seen other reputable and experienced chiro's do it by hand or with a mallet without issue - depends on that chiro's preference and imo it's not going to hurt your horse by itself. It's just a tool as any other (like, the hands). How reputable and experienced is this chiro? How did the other horses respond to his treatment? The chiro could have made a mistake or maybe your horse is sore for some other reason (related or not). If the chiro is otherwise experienced and reputable, call him up, explain the issue, and have him come out again if necessary. Otherwise get someone else in you trust.
    ....horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
    ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.



  6. #6
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    Sep. 8, 2010
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    OMG, that is insane! Was this person a vet? There is noooooo reason ever to use a mallet for chiro. The person doesn't have a clue what they are doing and shows that they have never had any chiropractic training. There is absolutely no school that teaches that.

    First find out if the person was a vet. Hopefully not. If they are not a vet, they need to at least be a human chiropractor with equine training. Regardless, please, please turn this person into the state veterinary board of the state you live in. Help other people from having this idiot hurt other horses. Red flags don't get any bigger then this.

    What state are you in?



  7. #7
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    May. 6, 2006
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    Default

    This sounds very similar to what I had this done on my horses in the Netherlands once. It's a specific type of manipulation, and I believe there's only a limited amount of practitioners worldwide.

    I so forgot what they called it over there. It was very popular at the barn we were at. The lady would organize a weekend and do like 20+ horses a day. You had to book well in advance.

    She used a giant rubber mallet and a rubber flat piece, not wooden piece underneath where she did the adjustments.
    It was absolutely not painful to any of the horses. She even demonstrated how it felt on the shoulder of owners if they wanted to.

    Now, whether it helped or not, I don't know. She used a pencil like tool to feel for soreness first.



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lieslot View Post
    This sounds very similar to what I had this done on my horses in the Netherlands once. It's a specific type of manipulation, and I believe there's only a limited amount of practitioners worldwide.

    I so forgot what they called it over there. It was very popular at the barn we were at. The lady would organize a weekend and do like 20+ horses a day. You had to book well in advance.

    She used a giant rubber mallet and a rubber flat piece, not wooden piece underneath where she did the adjustments.
    It was absolutely not painful to any of the horses. She even demonstrated how it felt on the shoulder of owners if they wanted to.

    Now, whether it helped or not, I don't know. She used a pencil like tool to feel for soreness first.

    At mallet and wood is totally different then the technique you saw overseas.



  9. #9
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    How so, davistina??? I would anticipate the wood would not absorb as much shock as the rubber obviously, and would be more abrasive, but if tapped lightly and used appropriately, how would it be much different? Granted, I am not sure exactly how the mallet and wood - and especially the wood - were used in the OP's case, since I wasn't there

    Whenever I've seen a mallet used, it was only lightly tapped on the opposite end to the end pressed against the bone. I am under the impression it can be a little more precise and a little easier in some circumstances.
    ....horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
    ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by naturalequus View Post
    How so, davistina??? I would anticipate the wood would not absorb as much shock as the rubber obviously, and would be more abrasive, but if tapped lightly and used appropriately, how would it be much different? Granted, I am not sure exactly how the mallet and wood - and especially the wood - were used in the OP's case, since I wasn't there

    Whenever I've seen a mallet used, it was only lightly tapped on the opposite end to the end pressed against the bone. I am under the impression it can be a little more precise and a little easier in some circumstances.
    You are right, the shock. Point being this would be considered malpractice by most vet boards and should be reported so that an investigation can be performed. Like I said, this shows lack of any training and a red flag is burning!



  11. #11
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    I had a conversation with my human chiro about the horse chiro, and his very first question was "does he use a mallet?"

    So based on that I think it's a normal technique for chiropractors who have to move large or stuck joints, and NOT malpractice or the sign of someone who doesn't know what they're doing. It may not look nice, but there's nothing wrong with it.

    Horses can be very sore and off after an adjustment, especially if it's their first one in awhile and even moreso if it's an older horse. I would have the chiro out again for a second adjustment and follow it up with a massage.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiffani B View Post
    I had a conversation with my human chiro about the horse chiro, and his very first question was "does he use a mallet?"

    So based on that I think it's a normal technique for chiropractors who have to move large or stuck joints, and NOT malpractice or the sign of someone who doesn't know what they're doing. It may not look nice, but there's nothing wrong with it.

    Horses can be very sore and off after an adjustment, especially if it's their first one in awhile and even moreso if it's an older horse. I would have the chiro out again for a second adjustment and follow it up with a massage.
    You are totally wrong. Your human chiro was asking because it's crazy. It is insane to let someone do this. Colorado shut down anyone that was using mallets about 10 years ago. It does not take that much force to adjust a horse. It is all technique, not force. Those that use mallets show that they do not have a clue what they are doing as you don't need anything even close to this to adjust a horse.

    I really can not emphasize enough how bad this is.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tiffani B View Post
    I had a conversation with my human chiro about the horse chiro, and his very first question was "does he use a mallet?"

    So based on that I think it's a normal technique for chiropractors who have to move large or stuck joints, and NOT malpractice or the sign of someone who doesn't know what they're doing. It may not look nice, but there's nothing wrong with it.

    Horses can be very sore and off after an adjustment, especially if it's their first one in awhile and even moreso if it's an older horse. I would have the chiro out again for a second adjustment and follow it up with a massage.
    You don't need a mallet to adjust a horse, even the biggest joints. You need to know the line of corrrection and have proper form. It's surprising how little it takes....

    The three legit animal chiro schools in this country do not teach using mallets.

    If your human chiro had been trained in veterinary chiropractic, they would not think a mallet was needed.
    Turn off the computer and go ride!



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by davistina67 View Post
    You are right, the shock. Point being this would be considered malpractice by most vet boards and should be reported so that an investigation can be performed. Like I said, this shows lack of any training and a red flag is burning!
    Erm, the shock??? Um, why the snark?

    I'm asking the question honestly - as someone who has seen some very excellent chiro's use mallets very gently and softly (absolutely NO force), usually not as a common practice, but as necessary. I am just looking for more insight and explanation into your opinion. To repeat, these people weren't hitting the horses with their mallets, lol, they were simply placing the mallet against the bone, then gently tapping the other end with their hand. No more force was used than if/when the chiro's hand was used and as I said, I understand it to be more for precision and to make their job a little easier on certain joints in certain situations. I think the point of using the board or rubber between mallet and skin is to absorb shock even more, even though the tool is used gently in the first place. Same as, for example, my own chiro uses different tools at different times, where necessary. I want to know HOW it is different and WHY it is considered malpractice by some and by you. I wouldn't report something without solid reasoning behind it
    ....horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
    ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by foggybok View Post
    You don't need a mallet to adjust a horse, even the biggest joints. You need to know the line of corrrection and have proper form. It's surprising how little it takes....

    The three legit animal chiro schools in this country do not teach using mallets.

    If your human chiro had been trained in veterinary chiropractic, they would not think a mallet was needed.
    Finally, a voice of reason! Yes, there are 3 schools that every trained person has to go to. If they didn'tgo to one of these 3, they are not trained.



  16. #16
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    Yikes, that's a very close-minded way of looking at things Too bad for any (clearly un-trained) Canadian chiropractors Any ideas yet on why a mallet cannot work when it is used as I described?

    Eta: Personally I am suspicious of the chiro who uses a mallet primarily or only, but I am having difficulty seeing why there can be no compromise, why there is absolutely no place for tools to aid one.
    ....horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
    ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.



  17. #17
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    Apr. 6, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by foggybok View Post
    The three legit animal chiro schools in this country do not teach using mallets.
    Interesting, thanks for the info! None of my chiros have ever used one but now I know if I see one used to question the chiro about why. I never would have thought it unusual in the past.

    Ya learn something new every day LOL!



  18. #18
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    Mar. 28, 2011
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    A horse being sore that soon after chiro isn't necessarily alarming, it really kinda depends on how sore and what exactly was done and how bad it was stuck. Typically after a significant adjustment, my chiro recommends about 3 days off because they might be sore. I will say, mine has never used a mallet.



  19. #19
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    What foggy said.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  20. #20
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    Apr. 22, 2006
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    I put him on the lunge line again today and I think his hind end is improving. That or wishful thinking. I gave him some bute and turned him back out. I am keeping my fingers crossed. Maybe because he is older it will take a while??? I can only hope...



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