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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2000
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    2,988

    Default Vines and fence weeds! How to safely remove?

    This spring's monsoons have resulted in an explosion of vines around my pastures and fields. These are growing up trees, the fences, through wire and over bushes. We can pull some of them off fairly easily, but through the wire and around the trees is tough. Weed whacking isn't a great option and we're talking acres of vines, including poison ivy (to which I'm highly allergic).

    How can I safely rid myself of these vines? I have horses, sheep and chickens in various portions of the property. My goat idea was nixed by my husband. Is there a safe way to rid my place of vines and weeds?
    "Whether you think you can or think you can't, you are right." -Henry Ford



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    9,722

    Default

    Borrow my horse & pony - they have cleared a 2' perimeter all along my fenceline. Looks like it's been mowed.


    Seriously:
    You can spray the weeds with a saltwater or vinegar solution that will kill the vegetation but not harm any horse who samples sprayed foliage.

    I use Roundup for poison ivy - you can spray from a safe distance using the pump-up sprayer it comes in.
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 17, 2007
    Posts
    211

    Default

    Old school way to clear fencelines is to spray diesel fuel along the fence row, kills everything including the grass also.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2010
    Location
    On The Farm In New England
    Posts
    870

    Default

    Get a pony!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,193

    Default

    I hack at them with long handled clippers, and get as close to the roots as possible. However, I don't have any poison ivy in mine, if that were the case, a good gallon of Round Up for poison ivy would be my weapon of choice.

    May I also recommend this Gilmore wheeled sprayer? I love mine, with 9 acres fenced, this is a godsend for spraying the fenceline:

    http://www.amazon.com/Gilmour-W4-Spr...6520087&sr=8-2
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2003
    Location
    somewhere. out there.
    Posts
    2,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MunchkinsMom View Post
    I hack at them with long handled clippers, and get as close to the roots as possible. However, I don't have any poison ivy in mine, if that were the case, a good gallon of Round Up for poison ivy would be my weapon of choice.

    May I also recommend this Gilmore wheeled sprayer? I love mine, with 9 acres fenced, this is a godsend for spraying the fenceline:

    http://www.amazon.com/Gilmour-W4-Spr...6520087&sr=8-2
    OMG! I NEED THAT SPRAYER!

    While I am a professional environmentalist, I freely admit to the use of round up on a regular basis, and in appropriate quantities. There is just no other solution at our farm to the horrid invasive species problem...and goats just won't work where we are. I've been using a 2 gallon handheld sprayer, but this looks AMAZING!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    9,459

    Default

    The "greenest" way to do it is a tether goat. You can use a dairy goat (and then milk it twice a day providing a convienient substitute for store bought stuff) or a meat goat (and then eat the goat when it gets big enough). Goats will not only eat honeysuckle they also eat poison ivy and poison oak. Amazing creatures.

    Mechanical means exist in weedeaters and various impliments. Hand operated clippers work, too.

    There are a variety of safe chemicals out there, too. They are discussed regularly around here.

    Weeds in our neck of the woods drink salt water and vinegar like it's mother's milk. That makes it a waste of time and very brown.

    If you've got lots of money use diesel.

    G.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    13,683

    Default

    Yup, goats love the crunchy stuff but you do need very good fences to keep them where you want them
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    9,459

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by carolprudm View Post
    Yup, goats love the crunchy stuff but you do need very good fences to keep them where you want them
    Indeed. The beauty of the tether goat is that you tie it to a fence (OK, "picket" it to the fence so we stay PC ) and move it a few times a day as it consumes the vegitation. At night put it in a stall with a quiet horse.

    G.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,891

    Default

    Spray them this fall when the Poplar trees turn yellow with Arsenal (Powerline). It doesn't take much, and that should be the end of them. Some may come back the next year with puny looking little leaves, but if you spray them again the next fall, that should finish them.

    I don't know of anything else that will kill them for good, and it needs to be done when the sap is going down. That's why I use the gauge of the Poplar trees.

    Arsenal will kill anything but a pine tree and kudzu. It's the only thing I've ever found that will kill a Sweet Gum tree.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    20,158

    Default

    I have the wheeled, battery operated sprayer too. It's wonderful! Just bought it this year.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2008
    Location
    Outside Ocala FL - Horse Capital of the World
    Posts
    6,193

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eponacelt View Post
    OMG! I NEED THAT SPRAYER!

    While I am a professional environmentalist, I freely admit to the use of round up on a regular basis, and in appropriate quantities. There is just no other solution at our farm to the horrid invasive species problem...and goats just won't work where we are. I've been using a 2 gallon handheld sprayer, but this looks AMAZING!
    I've had mine for 4 years now, and only had to replace the spray wand this year. No batteries, no pumping, the rotation of the wheels pressurizes the tank. If it starts to go slow, just wheel it back and forth about 5 times, and keep on spraying. I love it.
    There are friends and faces that may be forgotten, but there are horses that never will be. - Andy Adams



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2001
    Location
    Lemont, Il, USA
    Posts
    647

    Default

    Whatever method you use on the poison ivy, DO NOT BURN the remnants. The active irritant, urushiol, is not deactivated by death and will be carried by the smoke to your lungs. You do not want this.

    Decay slowly deactivates it.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    2,229

    Default

    For everyone that sprays Roundup on the fencelines:

    I am planning on using a herbicide for the same reasons as the OP. I'm giving up on the living fence idea because it's impossible to do any repairs without looking like you got on the losing end of a fight with a mountain lion!

    I'm thinking of using Roundup on the perimeter fence. If I spray directly under the fenceline and on the side of the fence where the horses can't reach, how long before I can turn the horses out on the treated areas? From previous searches, it seems everyone has a differing opinion on that.

    What do you guys do?



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,488

    Default

    Any ideas on how to get rid of buttercups?



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,891

    Default

    Roundup only knocks stuff back. It doesn't really kill it for good. 2-4-D for Buttercups. Arsenal when sap is going down kills it for good, but that means it's useless to spray it this time of year. I don't know of anything else on the market that will kill stuff for good. Even diesel fuel, as previously mentioned, mixed with anything else is not a permanent kill. Diesel and 2,4,5,T (no longer on the market) even only lasts 2 or 3 years.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
    Posts
    14,488

    Default

    So what time of year should I spray the 2-4-D to kill buttercups, and how long after do I need to keep horses off the field? Will it basically kill all the grass, and need to be reseeded? Thanks!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2003
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    somewhere. out there.
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fairview Horse Center View Post
    So what time of year should I spray the 2-4-D to kill buttercups, and how long after do I need to keep horses off the field? Will it basically kill all the grass, and need to be reseeded? Thanks!
    2-4-D while the buttercups are growing (you might already be a little too late this year) os what my soil and water guy told me. It will kill the broadleaf weeds AND the clover, but should leave the grass. Whether you need to reseed depends on how much you have in the way of weeds. My guy told me that my pastures would probably need to be reseeded. Darn it...

    Good luck. We had a bumpercrop of buttercup this year!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    33,628

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fairview Horse Center View Post
    Any ideas on how to get rid of buttercups?

    BUttercups are often an indicator that your soil needs to be improved.
    I seem to recall that it's a somewhat sour to wettish.

    Aside from spraying....soil test and ammend accordingly.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2009
    Posts
    82

    Default

    we've been using 2 4 D on our farm for several years and it doesn't kill our clover. Makes it kinda droopy but, it comes right back.



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