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  1. #1
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    Default Sobering news from Europe regarding the foal market

    Guess the slow economy is really taking a toll this year...

    http://www.eurodressage.com/equestri...g-survive-year



  2. #2
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    From the article: this year the society was unable to find a sufficient quantity of foals of good enough quality for the auction.
    It sounds more like a quality problem than an economic problem.
    Tranquility Farm - Proud breeder of Born in the USA Sport Horses, and Cob-sized Warmbloods
    Now apparently completely invisible!



  3. #3
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    I don’t know, the Danes have been producing some super horses!

    I am guessing it has more to do with the fact that because prices are so depressed, those with good foals are holding onto them instead of putting through an auction. A lack of buyers results in low bids, which reflects negatively on the breeder (not to mention the sires, dams, etc.).



  4. #4
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    Seems to be a trend away from buying foals ... and buying horses of riding age.

    The hitch is when buyers will not pay for what it costs to get them to riding age. I'm thinking of quality, not average.



  5. #5
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    Possibly not enough foals of sufficient quality because breeders really scaled back?
    "Because it's 2015"



  6. #6
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    Default

    I've been hearing that some breeders in Holstein are giving their entire mare herd the year off.

    Good foals from good motherlines are still always in demand though.



  7. #7
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    Dec. 2, 2002
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    Waterford, VA USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Possibly not enough foals of sufficient quality because breeders really scaled back?
    This!!
    Siegi Belz
    www.stalleuropa.com
    2007 KWPN-NA Breeder of the Year
    Dutch Warmbloods Made in the U. S. A.



  8. #8
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    Jun. 22, 2009
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    My vet says breedings are down about 33% from last year. With some of the foal auctions getting so huge (>200 foals) it was hard to keep a consistant quality before and certainly would be less possible now. Also given the inherent gamble in buying a foal and raising it to adulthood and current depressed prices of made and going horses it is harder for buyers to justify the investment of time and money.
    That being said I am still breeding. Those riding age horses have to come from somewhere.
    Cindy Bergmann
    Canterbury Court
    559-903-4814
    www.canterbury-court.com



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canterbury Court View Post
    That being said I am still breeding. Those riding age horses have to come from somewhere.
    Exactly.
    "No matter how cynical I get its just not enough to keep up." Lily Tomlin



  10. #10
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    That being said I am still breeding. Those riding age horses have to come from somewhere.
    And let's hope that in 3 years, when our foals are backed, the prices will be much better. A reduction in supply should eventually lead to an increase in price. Not to mention, the economy should be at least somewhat improved.



  11. #11
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    Cindy,
    If breedings are down 33% from last year, well, last year was not a good year. It's been seriously depressed for at least three years in my neck of the woods.

    I realize the Eastern seaboard has a much different experience.

    One of my vets, who is good at repro, said almost no one among her clientele is breeding. I don't think she has a big WB clientele, if that is an interest.

    Our economy is consumer driven, and people need to buy "stuff" to get it going.

    If people who have to sell are successful, they have money to someone else's stuff.



  12. #12
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    Clayton, CA USA
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    I asked my therio. how her season was going, and she said she was working 14 hour days breeding. I know a couple of years ago her business was way off, but not this year. I still think horse sales in general are slow, and foal sales, very slow, but I'm hoping things will improve, and I'm another who is breeding.
    Mystic Owl Sporthorses
    www.mysticowlsporthorses.com



  13. #13
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    Jasmine,
    I may move back to WI.
    Have to experience a winter again before I do anything too rash ...

    Sally



  14. #14
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    Not sure what other data Astrid is referring to but the foal auctions in my neck of the woods are far from being cancelled I feel the market is picking up big time again. It is only natural that with lower numbers being produced it's more difficult to put together a collection with as many top class foals. The Hano approach to this will probably be to look harder and to make the collection smaller but even more highscale. And it will be good that way.



  15. #15
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    I think it is probably a combination of issues.

    Tough economic times for the past several years and a very slow recovery have severely impacted market expansion. People are far less confident about the future so they don't want to risk what little disposable income they have on a foal.

    Breeders know the market is down, prices are down, interest in horses in general and foals in particular is down. Many breeders are stuck with older foals from previous years, so they are cutting back on breeding until they can make room.

    And as mentioned, some folks with top quality foals are not going to run them through an auction that doesn't attract a lot of interest from bidders.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by DownYonder View Post
    I think it is probably a combination of issues.

    Tough economic times for the past several years and a very slow recovery have severely impacted market expansion. People are far less confident about the future so they don't want to risk what little disposable income they have on a foal.

    Breeders know the market is down, prices are down, interest in horses in general and foals in particular is down. Many breeders are stuck with older foals from previous years, so they are cutting back on breeding until they can make room.

    And as mentioned, some folks with top quality foals are not going to run them through an auction that doesn't attract a lot of interest from bidders.
    The vast majority of the best foals never see the auction anyway. They get sold right off the farm.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oakstable View Post
    Jasmine,
    I may move back to WI.
    Have to experience a winter again before I do anything too rash ...

    Sally
    Dont do it. LOL



  18. #18
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    Well, if I could have a summer home in northern WI, maybe that would work.

    But we don't have mosquitoes here though I saw one a few days ago. First one in many years.

    I remember growing up in Portage as a kid and having welts the size of quarters.



  19. #19
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    I was there last weekend and heard the complete opposite. I heard that the foals and young horses are the ones selling fast, while the horses going are the ones having a tough time moving. I only went to one farm that didn't inseminate this year. But the ones of quality are definitely still moving. At least that is what I was being told.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bayhawk View Post
    The vast majority of the best foals never see the auction anyway. They get sold right off the farm.
    Agreed - esp. the stallion quality colts, who often get snapped up by professional stallion raisers, or by owners of the sire (esp. true for young stallions owned by a big station who is looking to make the stallion's reputation by sending multiple colts from his first foal crops for licensing).



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