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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Default Having issue with little paint horse and saddle pressure sore. PROBLEM SOLVED!!

    I've been dealing with this since January so it's time for professional COTH help.

    My Mom's lil paint horse, Toby
    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...oom/boots2.jpg
    has a pressure sore on his back. Both of my saddles show even sweat spots on him and he moves very nicely in them. In theory they fit fine.

    But since the start, they rub a 1" by 1" round sore on his back (left side) towards the rear end of the saddle. His back is mostly brown but it's white where the rub mark shows. So that's the most sensitive skin on his back to make matters worse.

    Jan: He started out VERY crooked and would always try to carry me on his left side to the point where my butt print on the saddle after riding was NOT centered.

    The sore did heal at one point when we added extra pads and his summer coat grew in--he had been clipped.

    Now, he's straighter, drifts right less, and my butt prints are centered. YEY for centered butt cheeks!!

    ***I had been using two sheep skins and a thin line on him but I don't think they are a 100% cure for the issue. I can still see some rubbed skin. In the Texas heat they just get soaked, squished, and become not soft anyhow...

    He does NOT get ridden lightly
    and his flat work is exceptional enough [for a little paint horse] that I sit most of the time now to do all the fun lateral work. So with increased work and lateral movement it looks like his back is rubbed again...
    His dressage days are usually 1+ hours.

    I hate big pads. But ya gatta do what ya gatta do.

    so I was thinking about getting one of these in 1/2":
    http://www.doversaddlery.com/wool-fe...-1915/cn/1405/

    I think I could cut out the section that falls over his pressure sore and use just a thin square pad underneath instead of a sheepskin.

    Anyone ever do anything like this?
    I'm really out of ideas.

    clueless, Purp.
    Last edited by purplnurpl; Jul. 6, 2011 at 03:27 PM.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2011
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    644

    Default

    Do you clip his back completely or do you leave a saddle patch?
    If not, it might be worth leaving a patch on his back - this is what we always do when clipping to prevent any rubs.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
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    Columbus, OH
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    Default

    First of all, the horse is freaking adorable!

    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post
    ***I had been using two sheep skins and a thin line on him but I don't think they are a 100% cure for the issue. I can still see some rubbed skin. In the Texas heat they just get soaked, squished, and become not soft anyhow...
    Okay, so let's clarify. Do you mean you were using a sheepskin pad directly on his back? I'm trying to picture this setup.

    I think I could cut out the section that falls over his pressure sore and use just a thin square pad underneath instead of a sheepskin.
    I was on board with this idea until you said "use just a thin square pad underneath." I think that thin square pad would still rub.

    But keep talkin' and maybe the COTH collective will come up with something...
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels



  4. #4
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    Default

    oh, thanks for the input guys!!

    I put this thread up yesterday just before seeing the thread concerning Boyd. I then totally forgot about it, it no longer seemed important...

    Napoles: I clipped him when I started riding him so at that time we didn't know that he would have rub issues. I did not leave a saddle patch but this winter I certainly will.

    j4j: Thanks. This is my mother's trail pony--after selling my horse I needed one to play with. I stole him. : )
    Last year I did a little bit with him and then started true work with him this January. He's a genius. All this time (we've had him for 6 years) we thought he was just a dumb pasture horse. lol. the little booger jumps CUTE. here he is when we first figured out he could jump.
    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...boom/toby1.jpg

    to answer your questions: I have been using a square pad with sheepskin, PLUS another 1/2 pad sheepskin. + an ultra thin line. (which I use on all horses)
    these:
    http://www.legacytack.com/pc/10996/A...addle+Pad.html
    http://www.rods.com/Fleeceworks-Clas...-Pad,5179.html
    http://thinlineglobal.com/store/cart...t_detail&p=174



    so my idea now is to use a regular cotton quilted pad underneath. With this on top.
    I bought this yesterday:
    http://www.legacytack.com/pc/10542/H...ddle+Pads.html

    My idea is that I can cut out the section that rubs to relieve that pressure point.
    section to cut out is shown in blue.

    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...boom/pad-1.jpg


    ****
    I love these foam pads. I use this pad also as make shift gusset on my dressage saddle. My horses always need the front lifted slightly. So I take this pad, cut it in half and then cut out a section over the withers. It works wonderfully.
    http://i128.photobucket.com/albums/p...therreleif.jpg
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
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    Default

    If I had to use three pads to make a saddle semi-fit, I wouldn't use that saddle on that horse. Have you ever worn two pairs of socks and felt the rubs? Same theory. If the saddle is rubbing in back, it may well be too narrow (or have too many pads making it fit as if too narrow) and therefore too lifted in front/putting too much pressure on the back. That would be my guess anyway based on what I remember of pics of you on other horses vs. Toby - his back looks wider/flatter if I remember correctly.


    It also sounds like your saddle is too wide for your other horses if you always have to put something under the front to make it fit them.


    You do what you want, and if your options work with your other horses that's great. Just thinking maybe you want to really consider saddle fit more than just more pads. If you have three pads on a horse it will generally sweat everywhere from the heat of it unless there are pinching points - any open spots will still likely sweat. That alone doesn't give all the answers you need.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Location
    Orlean, Va
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    Smile

    I'm confused. Is the cotton pad the layer closest to his back?

    I went to the sheepskin wool mattes pad to avoid rubbing. It will wick the sweat away from the back and it won't chafe like wet cotton. There is a reason that the endurance riders use sheepskin for the pad closest to the horse. It sounds like the saddle isn't fitting and rocking. Be careful that you aren't getting too much under the saddle and changing the balance. (My vet is a multiple world champion in endurance)

    Have you checked the saddle for hard knots in the panels, especially where the pressure sore is?

    Since you are in Texas, you might be close enough to Janek Vluggen's osteopathy institute to see if osteo might release whatever caused the unevenness. (I know from my DH from Lubbock, that close is a relative term in Texas,.
    Intermediate Riding Skills



  7. #7
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    Sep. 17, 2003
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    Fort Myers, Florida
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    Default

    Friends horse had a huge rub on his spine from where the lacing on her western saddle is. She used new saddle bags that were full and they just ground through her heavy pad!
    The horse is still using a pad that has been cut out to accommodate that area. It formed scar tissue and may always be a problem. This happened Oct last year.
    IMO instead of building up more and more padding on the affected area you need to cut away a space on a pad so there is no pressure at all! Oh yes, this was recommended by her Vet and so far it works well.
    "My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sunlight and nicker to me in the night"



  8. #8
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    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whicker View Post
    I'm confused. Is the cotton pad the layer closest to his back?

    I went to the sheepskin wool mattes pad to avoid rubbing. It will wick the sweat away from the back and it won't chafe like wet cotton. There is a reason that the endurance riders use sheepskin for the pad closest to the horse. It sounds like the saddle isn't fitting and rocking. Be careful that you aren't getting too much under the saddle and changing the balance. (My vet is a multiple world champion in endurance)

    Have you checked the saddle for hard knots in the panels, especially where the pressure sore is?

    Since you are in Texas, you might be close enough to Janek Vluggen's osteopathy institute to see if osteo might release whatever caused the unevenness. (I know from my DH from Lubbock, that close is a relative term in Texas,.
    The cotton pad will be closest with the new set up. With foam (with pressure cut out) on top.

    I've been using sheepskin and the saddles don't rock. It's not working.

    My saddles are felt and foam flocked. I don't like wool for that very reason.

    and as for osteopathy--
    though I won't be exploring osteopathic medicine/acupuncture or chiropractic work for personal reasons, this is a fun read.
    http://vluggeninstitute.com/case-study.php?id=153
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by birdsong View Post
    Friends horse had a huge rub on his spine from where the lacing on her western saddle is. She used new saddle bags that were full and they just ground through her heavy pad!
    The horse is still using a pad that has been cut out to accommodate that area. It formed scar tissue and may always be a problem. This happened Oct last year.
    IMO instead of building up more and more padding on the affected area you need to cut away a space on a pad so there is no pressure at all! Oh yes, this was recommended by her Vet and so far it works well.
    I agree. My vet mentioned it as well--I tried really hard to find a method that did not include destroying expensive pads--but alas, destroying pads is in my future.
    I'm hoping a cut out will help. Glad to hear someone else used the method with success.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  10. #10
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    Default

    purp I hate to say it, but it may come down to cutting open the cotton under-pad as well. I know from my track running days that nothing short of cutting a hole around the sore and making sure nothing abrades that area is going to fix a sore. You can certainly start with just the Wintec foam pad and see how it goes, but be prepared to chop up a cheapie cotton saddle pad as well!

    And wow he is KYOOOOT over that jump!
    ________________________
    Resident COTH saddle nerd. (CYA: Not a pro, just a long-time enthusiast!)
    http://twitter.com/jenlmichaels



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    purp I hate to say it, but it may come down to cutting open the cotton under-pad as well. I know from my track running days that nothing short of cutting a hole around the sore and making sure nothing abrades that area is going to fix a sore. You can certainly start with just the Wintec foam pad and see how it goes, but be prepared to chop up a cheapie cotton saddle pad as well!

    And wow he is KYOOOOT over that jump!
    noted. I don't mind killing a dinky cotton pad.

    Silly paint horse has written two blogs.
    see here under Cow Pony Chronicles I and II.
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Last edited by purplnurpl; Jun. 1, 2011 at 10:57 AM.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  12. #12
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    Feb. 26, 2007
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    Default

    Is your cotton pad long enough? Some people have been complaining about pressure points created by their square pads being too short underneath their sheepskin pads... but it sounds like maybe this is a different location. It's a thought, anyway.
    Founder, Higher Standards Leather Care Addicts Anonymous
    Capitalization is the difference between helping your Uncle Jack off a horse and helping your uncle jack off a horse.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by pattnic View Post
    Is your cotton pad long enough? Some people have been complaining about pressure points created by their square pads being too short underneath their sheepskin pads... but it sounds like maybe this is a different location. It's a thought, anyway.
    I've not used a plain cotton pad on him since the day the rubs started to show...

    The only method of padding used on this horse since Jan 2011 is a square pad with sheepskin and a 1/2 sheepskin pad on top of that.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  14. #14
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post
    I've not used a plain cotton pad on him since the day the rubs started to show...

    The only method of padding used on this horse since Jan 2011 is a square pad with sheepskin and a 1/2 sheepskin pad on top of that.
    Sorry - misread!
    Founder, Higher Standards Leather Care Addicts Anonymous
    Capitalization is the difference between helping your Uncle Jack off a horse and helping your uncle jack off a horse.



  15. #15
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    Oct. 21, 2005
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    Default

    I can send you something to try if you pm me. It may be possible to just use 1 pad to fit the overall shape of the horse and then I can send you something that you can adhere to or shim the square or half pad.

    my website is www.equinityperformance.com.

    There was a horse last year that we were successful in helping who developed a sore where the saddle went and we adhered a piece of my material to the square pad.

    PM me im sure I have some polymer material to send you.
    \"A smart lady knows its ok to change her mind, a damn fool never does\"



  16. #16
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    Jul. 30, 2005
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    That sounds like quite a bit of thickness under the saddle. How about cutting down to one thin, wicking pad?
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  17. #17
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    Default

    I'm going to agree with netg - and even go one further to say that it almost looks like your saddle is tipped forward a hair in that photo. Think ever-so-slight bridging that makes the rear panels shift up and down with each stride.

    Not to add more padding to your princess and the pea situation, but see if you can change the balance just a tiny bit to lift the pommel.

    Alternatively, without seeing it in person I might think that your saddle is just the wrong shape (i.e., flat on a horse that needs a banana).
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



  18. #18
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    Apr. 14, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    I'm going to agree with netg - and even go one further to say that it almost looks like your saddle is tipped forward a hair in that photo. Think ever-so-slight bridging that makes the rear panels shift up and down with each stride.

    Not to add more padding to your princess and the pea situation, but see if you can change the balance just a tiny bit to lift the pommel.

    Alternatively, without seeing it in person I might think that your saddle is just the wrong shape (i.e., flat on a horse that needs a banana).
    I agree, it looks like it is tipped down in front in the dressage photo. Have you had anyone take a video of you from the rear to see what is going on? He is a cutie so I hope you can resolve this quickly!



  19. #19
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    nah. It sits quite straight when he's standing and does not bridge.
    I would love to blame in on the saddle but my jumping saddle rubs him in the same spot.

    both of my saddles have banana shaped panels.

    I'll take a balance pic next time I ride him.
    I'm riding MIA right now due to a NASTY sinus infection.
    http://kaboomeventing.com/
    http://kaboomeventing.blogspot.com/
    Horses are amazing athletes and make no mistake -- they are the stars of the show!



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by purplnurpl View Post
    nah. It sits quite straight when he's standing and does not bridge.
    I would love to blame in on the saddle but my jumping saddle rubs him in the same spot.

    both of my saddles have banana shaped panels.
    I'll wait for pictures, but...

    Is it possible that banana shaped panels are not the ideal fit for his back, and/or it sits level when he's standing, but doesn't STAY level once he's in motion and presumably lifting his back more?

    Otherwise, I don't know. A friend of mine had started seeing rubs like this with her banana-shaped dressage saddle and they stopped when she got a different saddle - this is where my earlier thoughts came from.

    Cutting holes in every pad you use on him so they don't come back sounds expensive! And doesn't really seem like a remedy to the (yet unknown) cause.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson



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