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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2006
    Location
    Colorado- Yee Haw!
    Posts
    3,376

    Default

    Can you fence the front yard so kids could play there?



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    14,285

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4Martini View Post
    Can you fence the front yard so kids could play there?
    Electric fencing should keep even the most rambunctious kids in.

    OP- can you link to your ad on Realtor.com, and you can get opinions on why you aren't getting showings?

    Has your Realtor done comps on SOLD properties in the area? Pulling up listings that are near you that have sold in the last 3-6 months, ideally close to the same square footage.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    6,453

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    Quote Originally Posted by RainyDayRide View Post
    or you could both just make other living arrangements - buy house, rent apt, etc... move out and then just walk away from the house. Yes, your credit will be dinged for a while, but if you have a place to live and good income, what difference would it make? depending upon the laws of your state and whether or not you have refinanced since your original purchase, they might not even come after you for the deficiency.

    Heck, corporations are doing that right and left.. individuals might as well look after their own financial interests too. (and some are.)
    WHY! WHY! WHY!?? do people continue to think this is a viable option. That is a craptastic load of advice.

    Please people, take care of your debts and commitments. Many of us are "stuck" and not happy with it but when you just walk away, ultimately you screw all of us. Not just a bank.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    1,782

    Default

    Thanks for all the helpful advice and comments. AFAIK, the realtor is on top of things but I will ask her about some of the stuff mentioned. She has been the price setting driver, and I think she's being realistic and aggressive but it doesn't hurt to revisit the conversation.

    I would never just walk away-- I think most of what is wrong with America is the apparent rampant lack of personal and social responsibility. I'm just frustrated and venting!
    From now on, ponyfixer, i'll include foot note references.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    3,033

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sketcher View Post

    Please people, take care of your debts and commitments. Many of us are "stuck" and not happy with it but when you just walk away, ultimately you screw all of us. Not just a bank.
    That's not who has screwed you... it's

    - financial institutions that gave loans based on unrealistic appraisals to anybody who could fog a mirror because they immediately bundled the loans and sold them off to investors..the originators no longer cared if the loans were going to be paid off - they'd already made their money

    - appraisers who made unrealistic appraisals

    - realtors who sold people homes priced higher than what really made sense for buyers because banks were giving out crazy mortgages and their commissions were going to be quite nice

    - the Federal Reserve, loosening money supplies relentlessly in order to offset the loss from the tech downturn (and how has that worked out?) The people who were warning that a RE bubble was forming were discounted.

    - regulators who didn't regulate, either because laws had been eviscerated (sure miss Glass-Steagall) or because they were looking forward to having their turn at Goldman-Sachs

    - buyers who just had to have the latest and largest granite kitchen, regardless of whether or not they could afford it or needed the space

    - corporations who have been out-sourcing jobs for a couple of decades, making it harder for people to make decent salaries here in the US

    - financial institutions who have been accepting gov't handouts while dragging their feet on working with mortgage holders who would sincerely like to hold on to their houses. (Remember all those various alphabet programs .. like HOPE, etc.. that were supposed to require lenders and servicers to actually work with borrowers? They seemed to have turned into stringing-borrowers-along programs, getting a few more months of payments out of them, with few actually resulting in successfully modified mortgages. )

    Anybody who raids their IRAs, 401(k)s and college funds trying to hang on to a house due to misplaced guilt isn't taking care of his/her family. Banks aren't suffering these days... have you looked at recent qtrly reports and exec bonuses?



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2006
    Location
    Colorado- Yee Haw!
    Posts
    3,376

    Default

    You can blame it on others if you want, but the homeowner signed the contract.

    If house prices start going up more than expected in 10 years will banks be able to just evict homeowners and take back the homes? The precedent has been set...

    Quote Originally Posted by RainyDayRide View Post
    That's not who has screwed you... it's

    - financial institutions that gave loans based on unrealistic appraisals to anybody who could fog a mirror because they immediately bundled the loans and sold them off to investors..the originators no longer cared if the loans were going to be paid off - they'd already made their money

    - appraisers who made unrealistic appraisals

    - realtors who sold people homes priced higher than what really made sense for buyers because banks were giving out crazy mortgages and their commissions were going to be quite nice

    - the Federal Reserve, loosening money supplies relentlessly in order to offset the loss from the tech downturn (and how has that worked out?) The people who were warning that a RE bubble was forming were discounted.

    - regulators who didn't regulate, either because laws had been eviscerated (sure miss Glass-Steagall) or because they were looking forward to having their turn at Goldman-Sachs

    - buyers who just had to have the latest and largest granite kitchen, regardless of whether or not they could afford it or needed the space

    - corporations who have been out-sourcing jobs for a couple of decades, making it harder for people to make decent salaries here in the US

    - financial institutions who have been accepting gov't handouts while dragging their feet on working with mortgage holders who would sincerely like to hold on to their houses. (Remember all those various alphabet programs .. like HOPE, etc.. that were supposed to require lenders and servicers to actually work with borrowers? They seemed to have turned into stringing-borrowers-along programs, getting a few more months of payments out of them, with few actually resulting in successfully modified mortgages. )

    Anybody who raids their IRAs, 401(k)s and college funds trying to hang on to a house due to misplaced guilt isn't taking care of his/her family. Banks aren't suffering these days... have you looked at recent qtrly reports and exec bonuses?



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2009
    Posts
    788

    Default

    No suggestions...just lots of jingles as I am also trying to sell a home and have been for a horribly long time....
    My blog:

    RAWR



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    3,033

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 4Martini View Post
    You can blame it on others if you want, but the homeowner signed the contract.
    So did the lending institution ... the agreement was x number of payments at whatever terms, using the house as collateral. You don't pay, you lose your house. Nobody forced the banks/brokers to make that deal.

    If house prices start going up more than expected in 10 years will banks be able to just evict homeowners and take back the homes? The precedent has been set...
    Nope, not as long as the borrower meets the terms agreed to in the loan.

    And dream on if you think house prices are going to go up in any significant way in the next ten years.

    (Full disclosure ... when I bought my house, a 20% down payment was required, interest rates were double-digits, financial institutions made sure borrowers were qualified (no ninja loans) and houses were appraised, for the most part, by honest people.)
    Last edited by RainyDayRide; May. 31, 2011 at 12:56 PM.



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