The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 50
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2007
    Location
    Bremo Bluff, Virginia
    Posts
    1,460

    Default A Question For the Brits. How Do YOU Pronounce...

    Worcestershire? Like the sauce.

    I say it in 3 syllables, (wurst-er-shire).

    DH says it in 4, (wor-ches-ter-shire).

    The dictionary says that I'm correct. DH says that as it's named for the Shire of Worcester in England, he will not be satisfied until an English person tells him which is correct.

    p.s. - Our dictionary is Mirriam-Webster's, so an American publication.
    "In the beginning, the universe was created. This made a lot of people angry and has widely been considered as a bad move." -Douglas Adams



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    1,240

    Default

    My husband is british and says it's the first one - although in the English accent that R is very soft so it sounds like Wusster-shire!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 23, 2004
    Location
    Spinner's End
    Posts
    1,255

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by keepthelegend View Post
    My husband is british and says it's the first one - although in the English accent that R is very soft so it sounds like Wusster-shire!
    Agreed. And 'shire' in England is "shir"
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    ~Coth's Resident Deatheater~



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    What they said! I got so americanized since I went to school in the states that when I came back to the UK for uni I could not pronounce words like this for the life of me and got laughed at all the time! I learned quickly, haha. Don't worry, if you are a bonafide American you'll be ok, I just wasn't because I have a sort of British accent so Brits thought I was really funny.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by keepthelegend View Post
    My husband is british and says it's the first one - although in the English accent that R is very soft so it sounds like Wusster-shire!
    I'm not British (though my mom is a British subject), but I've always understood it to be WUSS-tah-sure. No *r*, no *shIRE*.
    Horse & Dog Designs: Clothing, Pendants, Water Bottles, Totes, Phone Cases, ETC:
    WoofNWhinny*
    NEW: Saddlebreds, Dragons, Western Roses, & Cairns

    Horsey Humor, Ponies, Barn Safety & More.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2009
    Posts
    5,661

    Default

    My all-time favorite pronunciation is the British one for aluminum - "al-yew-MIN-ee-um". I so wish I could say it that way without sounding pretentious.

    Also like "shed-YULE" (schedule) and "left-nant" (lieutenant).
    Last edited by Mara; May. 29, 2011 at 04:59 PM.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
    Posts
    6,693

    Default

    On the other hand, if you live in Massachusetts, you pronounce your city WUS-tah. (Worcester.)
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2005
    Location
    Colorado Springs, CO
    Posts
    1,950

    Default

    My mother calls it, "what's this here sauce" because she was never able to decide how to properly pronounce it.
    "Is it ignorance or apathy? Hey, I don't know and I don't care." ~Jimmy Buffett



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2008
    Location
    gorgeos city
    Posts
    664

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mara View Post
    My all-time favorite pronunciation is the British one for aluminum - "al-yew-MIN-ee-um". I so wish I could say it that way without sounding pretentious.
    British?
    Just about every English speaking country outside of the US pronounces it like that.
    ----//\\----
    ---//--\\---
    --//----\\--
    -//------\\-



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 18, 2004
    Location
    Red Bank, NJ
    Posts
    1,658

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Curb Appeal View Post
    My mother calls it, "what's this here sauce" because she was never able to decide how to properly pronounce it.
    Love it!
    Sarah K. Andrew | Twitter | Blog | Horses & Hope calendar | Flickr | Website



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,856

    Default

    I'm British - I grew up with the stuff and it is called "WUStah" sauce. As in
    PUSSY. The 'shire' gets lost somewhere, like President Obama's apostrophe.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2006
    Posts
    1,070

    Default

    It's WUSS-tah, Massachusetts and WUSTA-shirr sauce.

    IMHO, that is.

    Bonus points if you can properly pronounce the surname Cholmondeley.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,556

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Flashy Gray VA View Post
    It's WUSS-tah, Massachusetts and WUSTA-shirr sauce.

    IMHO, that is.

    Bonus points if you can properly pronounce the surname Cholmondeley.
    Can I guess?

    CHAUMN-dlee.

    Now what/where is it?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    1,240

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by WoofNWhinny* View Post
    I'm not British (though my mom is a British subject), but I've always understood it to be WUSS-tah-sure. No *r*, no *shIRE*.
    Yes it's definitely shir not shire. Same with all the counties in England, always shir.



  15. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Foxtrot's View Post
    I'm British - I grew up with the stuff and it is called "WUStah" sauce. As in
    PUSSY. The 'shire' gets lost somewhere, like President Obama's apostrophe.
    That's how I learnt how to pronounce it. I have heard some Brits use the 3 syllable way too though. It's like nails on a blackboard to me when I hear it pronounced Wore-chester-shyre ....



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2006
    Posts
    1,070

    Default

    Close, so close, mvp!

    It's pronounced "Chumley."

    One of my favorite peculiar drop-lots-o-letters British-isms!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
    Posts
    5,656

    Default

    Wusster sauce. No "shire."

    Chummley.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2006
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    1,330

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mara View Post
    My all-time favorite pronunciation is the British one for aluminum - "al-yew-MIN-ee-um".
    I've never understood this. It would have to be spelled aluminIum with an extra syllable/vowel.
    "Oh, sure, you may be able to take down one smurf, but mark my words: You bonk one smurf, you better be ready for a blue wave."---Bucky Katt



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2008
    Location
    gorgeos city
    Posts
    664

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RHdobes563 View Post
    I've never understood this. It would have to be spelled aluminIum with an extra syllable/vowel.
    But it IS spelled with an extra "i".
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium
    ----//\\----
    ---//--\\---
    --//----\\--
    -//------\\-



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,187

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mickey the Marcher View Post
    But it IS spelled with an extra "i".
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluminium
    Yeah, that's why I never understand why Americans pronounce it the way they do - just weird.

    And I know someone who's surname is Cholmondeley-Smith.

    What about Chiswick? Had an arguement with my older sister when I was about 9 that it should be said "Chisick" - must have heard someone saying it - an Aunt lived there. I was very pleased when my British mother confirmed I was correct. It's not often you get to better your older sister!!



Similar Threads

  1. Brits--Another IDSH stallion m.j. Fine Art
    By vineyridge in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Sep. 22, 2011, 09:30 PM
  2. Brits--Super Premium H.I.S (1950) TB
    By vineyridge in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jun. 15, 2009, 05:47 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness