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  1. #1

    Default PETA Wants $360 fee added...

    PETA Wants $360 Fee Added to TB Horse Registrations & Ownership Transfers
    According to a piece written on the Opposing Views blog, New York Times sports columnist William C. Rhoden will no longer cover horse racing because he believes it's inhumane. The blog goes on to say: "Rhoden also joined PETA in condemning the racing industry's abandonment of burned-out, used-up thoroughbreds and backed PETA's proposed Thoroughbred 360 Lifecycle Retirement Plan, which would require that thoroughbred owners and breeders pay a $360 retirement fee for every foal registration, ownership transfer, and breeding registration."



    Read more: http://www.quarterhorsenews.com/inde...#ixzz1NQhORfjL
    Closest thing to a sauna around here would be tarping over a few cows, hold a bucket of water & light a match.



  2. #2
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    Ummmmm, and that $360 is going to cover what exactly?
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  3. #3

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    That would add up to a lot of money, if it is charged every time a transaction takes place.

    I would be concerned that the money would be managed by a responsible agency or board. Would qualifying retirement/placement organizations be able to apply for funds or grants for rehoming or retiring?

    It's a great idea, but implementation could be a nightmare if not managed correctly. Some horses can be retrained, some retire as pasture pets. What about mares? There are plenty that could go into the breeding shed, but probably shouldn't. So who gets the money and for what purpose?

    Edit: I just did a google search for "PETA's Thoroughbred 360 Lifecycle Retirement Fund" and all I get is the same message -- write the JC and ask for it to be implemented. No actual details on what they propose. Anyone else have details or is this just a nice idea with no real substance to it?



  4. #4
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    It actually sounds like a reasonable way to cover retirement. IF it's managed correctly. Perhaps the fee could only be required for horses that are raced, vs purpose bred sport horses.

    I know that's a big IF, but if the money were given to organizations like CANTER and New Vocations and other reputable programs, you'd really have something.
    ==================
    Somehow my inner ten year old seems to have stolen my chequebook!



  5. #5
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    A new fee added on to registrations of this size would burden large breeding farms into bankrupcy. It would also send a bunch of old broodies straight to the kill pens as farms cut the number of foals raised. I know from experience---this happened to the Standard breeding farms when across the board the registry implemented bloodtyping fees for every broodmare (due all in the same year).



  6. #6
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    Who would the $360 fee go to? You only have to read recent headlines to see how badly the current TB retirement homes are managing the money they bring in. Throwing more money into the hands of people who are more intersted in glorifying themselves than in saving horses does no one any good.



  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DressageFancy View Post
    A new fee added on to registrations of this size would burden large breeding farms into bankrupcy. It would also send a bunch of old broodies straight to the kill pens as farms cut the number of foals raised. I know from experience---this happened to the Standard breeding farms when across the board the registry implemented bloodtyping fees for every broodmare (due all in the same year).
    That is PETA's aim--to put breeders out of business. And to have animals killed rather than owned by humans.



  8. #8

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    It is possible that the awareness factor of what happens to ex-racers, plus the financial burden of this fee, might make some backyard breeders think twice about putting more mediocre foals on the ground.

    On the other hand, we could lose some valuable old bloodlines if people don't want to take the chance on breeding a cross that isn't proven in today's market.

    However, I am more concerned about the implementation and dispersal of this money. The potential for fraud or misuse could be huge if it's not managed correctly.



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kwill View Post
    It is possible that the awareness factor of what happens to ex-racers, plus the financial burden of this fee, might make some backyard breeders think twice about putting more mediocre foals on the ground.
    You think there are a lot of backyard breeders in racing? Not in my experience. It's too expensive all the way around.



  10. #10
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    There are certainly a lot of smaller Thoroughbred producers/breeders in the business, not necessarily the racing end of the spectrum.



  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pronzini View Post
    You think there are a lot of backyard breeders in racing? Not in my experience. It's too expensive all the way around.
    I agree. I see commercial stallion owners and breeders as the cause of *most* of the problems in this industry.



  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pronzini View Post
    You think there are a lot of backyard breeders in racing? Not in my experience. It's too expensive all the way around.
    You are probably right. However, if the financial aspect makes anyone a more thoughtful breeder, I think it's a good thing. What will probably happen, however, is people will just stop doing the paperwork on horses they don't think can win at the track.



  13. #13
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    Posted elsewhere as well this is Rhoden's article against racing and embracing PETA's fee/charge

    If he wants to stop writing articles about racing fine. But actually do it - stop writing any racing articles be it pro or con.



  14. #14
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    If it has the word PETA attached to it, it is automatically a bad idea. I personally am in favor of a per start fee as well as a additional fee added onto the registration cost. That way you get them all in the beginning and get continuing support throughout their careers for the ones actually out there racing. The problem of course is who will oversee it and make sure the money actually gets to the horses that need it. It is a huge problem but not one that can't be solved in my opinion.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by freshman View Post
    I agree. I see commercial stallion owners and breeders as the cause of *most* of the problems in this industry.
    The large commercial industry tends to focus on proven bloodlines and producing foals with an attractive enough pedigree to make them sellable. The NUMEROUS backyard breeders have a local no-name stallion's daughter with blacktype, or hell, even a win 3 generations back and they breed to the guy up the street's unraced stallion because it is free or cheap.

    The large breeder's foals are bred for specific athletic abilities, the nicking reports are used to maximize the potential of the progeny by carefully deciding what characteristics are likely to come through on each side. The results overall, tend to be better than the small time guy who bred to a stallion just because he had the necessary equipment
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by starrunner View Post
    There are certainly a lot of smaller Thoroughbred producers/breeders in the business, not necessarily the racing end of the spectrum.
    Agreed . Search CL any day and you can find many homebred TBs that closely resemble yaks. My favorite ads are where they have a mother/daughter pair that have never accomplished anyhting, yet are both in foal and for sale because the owner is downsizing. Maybe the owner should have thought of that before they BRED them again
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"



  17. #17

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    From the article:

    "“We began to look into what the retirement plans are, and they’re practically nonexistent,” said Kathy Guillermo, the PETA vice president."

    OK, what does she propose to implement for horse retirement? I would like to see a plan, here. A farm? Grants to existing farms/placement services? Rebates to race breeders that keep retired horses when they are done racing?

    The devil's in the details.



  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by rustbreeches View Post
    Agreed . Search CL any day and you can find many homebred TBs that closely resemble yaks. My favorite ads are where they have a mother/daughter pair that have never accomplished anyhting, yet are both in foal and for sale because the owner is downsizing. Maybe the owner should have thought of that before they BRED them again
    I am on an email list for what I would regard as smalltime race breeder sales site -- I inquired about a two year old filly with very unremarkable breeding as a sporthorse prospect. I thought she was cute but she's nothing special (I didn't buy because the cost of shipping just wasn't worth it). This filly is listed at $1000 but he would just give her away. This farm bred a bunch of horses for the track, his "investor" pulled out, and now he's left with horses that aren't going to race and really have no future, as the mares at least shouldn't be bred and sporthorse people probably aren't that interested. A lot of hope there, and little sense.

    I realize we are talking about helping ex-racers here, but these horses probably aren't even going to GET to the track, because as you say, it's expensive.



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kwill View Post

    I realize we are talking about helping ex-racers here, but these horses probably aren't even going to GET to the track, because as you say, it's expensive.
    And getting to the track requires training at a minimum of $30 a day(more like $50-55 but we are talking bottom feeders) and registration which involves photos, DNA, stallion certificates etc and then tattooing, gate cards etc

    So I doubt very much that too many people raising actual racing horses are really part of the backyard equation to any significant degree unless we have a different idea of what backyard means.



  20. #20
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    Alot of people breeding backyard horses either hold a trainer's license or have a friend that does. They will feed substandard hay, rent the cheapest facility possible or attempt to train them on their 4 acre farmette. They use the cheapest grain, like Country Acres and feed minimal amounts and bedding is a luxury few will afford. The farrier makes an appearance every few months and a vet only sees the horse in the receiving barn. The exercise rider will show up sporadically so they "paddock train" alot. Most will be 4 and 1/2 horses so they can walk and run, walk and run. Yes, there are alot of these shit bred horses that make it to lower end tracks all over the country
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"



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