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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2008
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    the back of my horse
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    595

    Default ranitidine?

    I was just wondering what people's experiences were with this in treating ulcers. Also, how many mg were you giving a day?

    Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    36,077

    Default

    3mg/lb at least twice a day, 3x for better/faster results
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2003
    Location
    St Aug, Fla
    Posts
    3,822

    Default

    I saw a difference in my mare using it. She wouldnt clean up her feed, was grumpy, weaved in her stall, paced the fence, etc. With my work schedule I could only do twice a day but after about 7-10 days, I saw a good improvement.
    ~~~~~~~~~

    Member of the ILMD[FN]HP Clique, The Florida Clique, OMGiH I loff my mares, and the Bareback Riders clique!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 10, 2008
    Location
    the back of my horse
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    595

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KrazyTBMare View Post
    I saw a difference in my mare using it. She wouldnt clean up her feed, was grumpy, weaved in her stall, paced the fence, etc. With my work schedule I could only do twice a day but after about 7-10 days, I saw a good improvement.
    Did you use this for ulcers? How long did you use it for?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2006
    Posts
    2,456

    Default

    My horse was scoped and had moderate ulcers. Was treated with 8 weeks of gastroguard and was rescoped (loved when insurance covered ulcers). He showed no improvement in behavior and had "maybe some" improvement on the scope. Insurance would only cover the 8 weeks so we switched to ranitidine 3x day with a cup of aloe juice and a cup of apple sauce (so he'd eat it). I also gave him 2 scoops of neighlox right before any rides/trailering/stress. In 2 weeks we had dramatic improvement of character. At 4 weeks we rescoped (yep still covered by insurance ). He was ulcer free.

    Theory, his stomach was to too acidic to allow a sufficient amount of omeprazole into the small intestine to be absorbed. Unlike the human version gastro guard is not coated for protection as it is a paste but uses a small amount of antiacids to buffer the acid hopefully enough and hopefully long enough. It does make me wonder if we could use a smaller dose with the human drugs with good effect since the drug would actually survive the stomach.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 15, 2006
    Posts
    320

    Default

    I've had good results with it.. fed 3300mg every 8 hours (was sometimes off an hour or so but tried to stick as close to that as possible) for 23 days. OTTB went from kicking his belly nonstop, throwing his head constantly and stretching his head/neck/mouth in weird positions, and so sensetive in the belly area you could barely even touch him to fairly normal within a few weeks... this was also in combination with papaya tablets, aloe vera juice, and plenty of alfalfa hay - all of which we have kept him on for prevention.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2007
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    1,016

    Default

    I had good results with it for my 20-something Arab's gastric ulcers.

    I was giving him (20) 150 mg smashed tablets daily; divided into two feedings.

    He lost a lot of weight this past winter, so I added 3# of soaked timothy/alfalfa cubes to his daily feed regimen.

    Shortly after adding the cubes, I was able to quit giving him the Ranitidine because of the calcium carbonate in alfalfa. Evidently that was enough for him.

    That might not work for all horses



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2003
    Location
    St Aug, Fla
    Posts
    3,822

    Default

    I used it for suspected ulcers. When speaking to my vet (was down getting lameness exam/hock injections), he mentioned the ranitidine and that he has had success curing very mild ulcers with it. He said its cheaper to try the ranitidine first and see if you have a positive result. If you do, he told me to do it for 2 weeks. If the symptoms didnt subside then he would recommend scoping to see if they are more aggressive. Never had to go that route - after 2 weeks, all the symtpoms went away. I now support her daily with U7 liquid (30cc every night before turnout).
    ~~~~~~~~~

    Member of the ILMD[FN]HP Clique, The Florida Clique, OMGiH I loff my mares, and the Bareback Riders clique!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2006
    Posts
    34

    Default

    There is also now a compounded powdered version of omeprazole (what gastrogard is)--it may be more expensive than the ranitidine but it's cheaper than gastroguard and quite effective (and more effective that ranitidine), according to my vet.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2006
    Location
    Williamston, NC
    Posts
    1,514

    Default

    I use ranitidine for my mare as a preventative. She has the temperament and nervousness when at shows to make her vulnerable. It has made a difference. She feels better and is more willing to work to her potential.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    20,372

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flyracing View Post
    My horse was scoped and had moderate ulcers. Was treated with 8 weeks of gastroguard and was rescoped (loved when insurance covered ulcers). He showed no improvement in behavior and had "maybe some" improvement on the scope. Insurance would only cover the 8 weeks so we switched to ranitidine 3x day with a cup of aloe juice and a cup of apple sauce (so he'd eat it). I also gave him 2 scoops of neighlox right before any rides/trailering/stress. In 2 weeks we had dramatic improvement of character. At 4 weeks we rescoped (yep still covered by insurance ). He was ulcer free.

    Theory, his stomach was to too acidic to allow a sufficient amount of omeprazole into the small intestine to be absorbed. Unlike the human version gastro guard is not coated for protection as it is a paste but uses a small amount of antiacids to buffer the acid hopefully enough and hopefully long enough. It does make me wonder if we could use a smaller dose with the human drugs with good effect since the drug would actually survive the stomach.
    Not true about the gastrogard not being coated for protection. That is actually the secret to it's success and why we have to spend so much stinking money buying the real stuff instead of the dirt cheap compounded stuff without the encapsulation.



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