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  1. #1
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    Default looking for reining

    I am looking for some good instruction on reining. Does anyone have a favorite book,dvd or magazine you could recommend?

    thanks



  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorfan View Post
    I am looking for some good instruction on reining. Does anyone have a favorite book,dvd or magazine you could recommend?

    thanks
    If you really want to learn reining, find yourself a good instructor with a trained reining horse as a lesson horse.



  3. #3
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    Jun. 30, 2005
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    Default

    I have to agree with 7HL. Reining requires alot of training (as do most disciplines) and instruction and something that a person unfamiliar with it should learn in person.

    However, with that said Bob Avila has a great number of training DVD's.
    RIP Sucha Smooth Whiskey
    May 17,2004 - March 29, 2010
    RIP San Lena Peppy
    May 3, 1991 - March 11, 2010



  4. #4
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    Default

    NRHA is a great association and a great place to start. Associate memberships start at $20. You can also find trainers in your area that are NRHA Professional Horseman. I recommend starting there.

    I've ridden reiners for several years and there is no way I could learn from a book what I learned from my trainer.
    Only two emotions belong in the saddle: One is a sense of humor. The other is patience.



  5. #5
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    Default

    Have to agree that a trainer is the BEST way to learn.

    But I found books helpful in getting concepts in my brain when I wasn't on my horse. I have Al Dunning's & Sandy Collier's books since I do reined cowhorse. I really like them both but Sandy's is really laid out well and goes through the basics. Might be worth a look.



  6. #6
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    May. 19, 2011
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    Default

    I will echo, a trainer is the BEST way to learn.

    Books do have their place, as do videos.

    Shawn Flarida made a series called "Good as Gold"
    Al Dunning's videos and his book "Reining"
    Dell Hendricks made a video years back that is VERY good.

    If you havent already, check out the NRHA website, the trainer section. You should be able to find a trainer by state. Good luck!



  7. #7
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    Default

    I also suggested a trainer with trained lesson horse for a reason. There are some out there that think it would be cool if they did reining with their horse because....

    They did a slow spin with their horse or maybe by accident their horse did a slide.

    There is as much that goes into training a reining horse. Self training from a book or video of a horse and a rider is a disaster waiting to happen.



  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by colorfan View Post
    I am looking for some good instruction on reining. Does anyone have a favorite book,dvd or magazine you could recommend?

    thanks
    Reining is all about being very technically correct.

    Best you learn the basics with a trainer on a schoolmaster, well trained horse.
    Once you have learned the basics, books, videos, clinics, all that can add to your understanding of the concepts and will help you aquire the necessary skills to become more and more correct, after you have learned what is correct from a trainer and a well trained horse.

    Starting with books and videos, you will just miss so much and make so many mistakes as it being a waste of time for you and your horse.

    In reining, being correct is the most important part, or it is not reining.



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmine View Post
    I know someone who calls herself a reining trainer. All she's done is watch Stacy Westfall videos on youtube. Never competed, or taken lessons with an actual reining trainer.

    Her horses all go in snaffle bits (doesn't see the reason for a "cruel" curb bit) and are barefoot (doesn't see the reason for sliding plates). None of her horses neck rein, either.

    I ride H/J, and only H/J. And even I can tell her horses aren't reiners.
    I wonder about people like that, that write longwinded post about how you need to train and how to do this or that and it is clearly obvious to anyone that is learning and training seriously that they don't have the foggiest idea.
    They are winging it, inventing it all from a few concepts they have half misunderstood when hearing them here and there and blissfully keep on thinking they know what they are talking about.
    I have seen people like that even show (at the lowest levels) and then complain because no one appreciate their great performances, as reflected by the scores.

    There is such thing as not knowing how little you know.

    Reining is very technical and it takes years to become good and develop an educated eye for what is correct.

    I knew that, nothing is as simple as it looks when you don't know much about it, so when I wanted to learn, I went to the best trainer I could find.
    I am just a beginner myself and will be for long time, but will be learning all along and slowly getting better at it and at judging what is good and better.

    Being proficient in other disciplines, I can say that you just have to learn with someone right there and the right horse, if you want your riding to be "reining".

    Examples.
    - False, "coke bottle" spins, where a horse spins incorrectly by switching ends, hind end scooting around one way, front end the other, not rocking over it's hind end, planting a hind foot and turning over it while crossing in front and all that with rythm and good form thru the spin, not falling into it and dropping a shoulder, but staying soft and without resistences thru it all.
    -Stops. They are not about any sliding or how far to slide, no one will measure that, but about good form in the stop, the horse coming under itself softly and walking in front to defuse that energy built to the stop, as it folds to a smooth, easy, straight, well balanced stop, one the horse can then back from or turn around in one smooth motion.
    -Turn arounds are different then spins, where a horse walks around in the spin, in a turn around it pivots at once over it's hind end.
    -Circles have to be with a horse again soft and in self carriage thru the whole circle, not hurrying here and there or falling into the circle with it's shoulders or slipping it's hindend out and loping crooked or needing to be corrected and if corrected, how it is responding to corrections.
    Also, circles are about some faster, some slower and how the transitions happen from one to the other.
    Flying lead changes have to be correct, without resistence, smooth and the horse not falling into the front end or hurrying into or after the changes, but as invisible as they can be made.

    Those are mere basics and you need to learn when they are correctly executed and for that, you need a trainer walking you thru it, videos and books just won't do it, all you will be good from them is to go post about it on some horse forum and think you sound like you know what you are talking about.



  10. #10
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    Reining is very technical and it takes years to become good and develop an educated eye for what is correct.
    Absolutely right on!


    I would not go to any reining trainer that doesn't have any record of competing. Look up standings, how they have done. Check out the history of horses they have trained.

    Find someone that has paid their dues, so to speak. Spent some time at their craft.



  11. #11
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    The NRHA website has a lot of information available, including episodes of their "Inside Reining" TV program to view. No membership required. I agree with most everything posted so far.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    -Turn arounds are different then spins, where a horse walks around in the spin, in a turn around it pivots at once over it's hind end.
    Bluey, I was scratching my head..as around here we call spins "turnarounds" sometimes..then I ready your description and realized you are talking about a rollback.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by spinandslide View Post
    Bluey, I was scratching my head..as around here we call spins "turnarounds" sometimes..then I ready your description and realized you are talking about a rollback.
    Yeah, my brain is on a holding pattern, waiting on the farrier and wondering about this EHV-1 and hoping he was not in a barn with infected horses before showing up here.

    Yes, rollback it is, we used to call them turnarounds before reining, rollbacks were those while training, on a fence line, that was some 40 years ago, before "real" reining.



  14. #14
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    May. 19, 2011
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    yep, I wouldnt doubt it...

    Ive heard some "older" reining trainers talk about what a rollback used to be..and what it is now..Al Dunning specificly if memory serves me right.

    I knew it wouldnt be long before that EHV-1 showed up in good ole Texas..I have three horses who need their feet done...low chance my farrier would bring it..but ya still worry..so I understand.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by spinandslide View Post
    yep, I wouldnt doubt it...

    Ive heard some "older" reining trainers talk about what a rollback used to be..and what it is now..Al Dunning specificly if memory serves me right.

    I knew it wouldnt be long before that EHV-1 showed up in good ole Texas..I have three horses who need their feet done...low chance my farrier would bring it..but ya still worry..so I understand.
    Yes, reining then and now, almost like two different disciplines.
    I am just a beginner at this new reining, interesting how it has developed into what it is today.
    They are talking about developing it further.
    Interesting to see where it goes.
    Riders definitely need a trainer to walk them thru the basics, no "book learning" will get the little details right, when it is so easy with someone showing you the ropes.



  16. #16
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    I think Books and videos have a place..not in training..but just as a general "let me see what this is about" before they dive headlong into more serious commitments...

    Ive been reining for awhile and I will watch videos. My favorite are Fappanni's 2 and 3 year old DVD series. But I already have the concepts down..for a person new to reining, a futurity making video like that would probably sound alot like gibberish.

    Reining has evolved VERY much in the past few years..there are alot of "tricks of the trade", and methods to get these horses to do what they do.



  17. #17
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    Feb. 5, 2011
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    Default

    I have checked out the NRHA, the nearest town listed is a 7 hour drive.

    Many years ago I did reining, I am aware the sport has changed and developed, this is part of why I am asking for direction.

    I too am aware that there are those who call themselves a 'trainer' who can't correctly saddle a horse, again, this is why I am asking.

    As a reiner gone dressage returning to reining I am well aware of the time and correctness required.
    The correctness awareness is again part of why I am asking.

    I do not believe in gimmicks or shortcuts, I prefer to take the time needed to teach and develop the horse.

    I am surprised at some of the responses, it sounds like some of you are assuming I have never sat on a horse before and unless I can use a lesson master I might as well hang up my bridle and sell my horse.

    Did all of you start on a schoolmaster with a bnt?

    Bluey, your post is an excellent example of why I am asking for who is, sorry to be blunt, considered good.
    There is a barn in town where the instructor literally does not know the difference between a leg yeild and a side pass.

    In other disciplines I can post a question re training and I get very helpful advice on how to train correctly, not just told get a schoolmaster and a trainer or nothing.



  18. #18
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    Default

    Thank you for the names mentioned, I will see what I can find on them.



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by colorfan View Post
    I have checked out the NRHA, the nearest town listed is a 7 hour drive.

    Many years ago I did reining, I am aware the sport has changed and developed, this is part of why I am asking for direction.

    I too am aware that there are those who call themselves a 'trainer' who can't correctly saddle a horse, again, this is why I am asking.

    As a reiner gone dressage returning to reining I am well aware of the time and correctness required.
    The correctness awareness is again part of why I am asking.

    I do not believe in gimmicks or shortcuts, I prefer to take the time needed to teach and develop the horse.

    I am surprised at some of the responses, it sounds like some of you are assuming I have never sat on a horse before and unless I can use a lesson master I might as well hang up my bridle and sell my horse.

    Did all of you start on a schoolmaster with a bnt?

    Bluey, your post is an excellent example of why I am asking for who is, sorry to be blunt, considered good.
    There is a barn in town where the instructor literally does not know the difference between a leg yeild and a side pass.

    In other disciplines I can post a question re training and I get very helpful advice on how to train correctly, not just told get a schoolmaster and a trainer or nothing.
    We responded to the information you gave us, that was coming across like someone that didn't know anything about reining.
    Sorry we don't seem to have pleased you with our answers.



  20. #20
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    Dec. 31, 2005
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    Default

    A friend of mine that is VERY much into breeding, raising and training reiners sent me a link to this site... http://www.iphda.com/ International Performance Horse Development Association. You may try it out.



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