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  1. #1
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    Default What to advise the child riding a pony that roots?

    We are leasing a wonderful pony for my 9 yr old. I love this pony, he is experienced, safe, does not have "tude", knows his job and is a bit of a character.

    However, he has one vice, he has a pretty good root. His teeth have been done, his bit fits well and my son's hands are actually pretty good for a 9 yr old. He does not balance on his hands at all but his hands are not perfect. This is a apparently a long standing habit, my son is not the first one he has done it with. Pony has taught several kids to ride and he is probably a bit "over" beginners. Can't say as I blame him.

    Some days, as the ride progresses, he has almost pulled child forward onto his neck. Yesterday DS almost cried when pony yanked him forward and mashed his ....male parts...onto the front of the saddle.

    If it were happening to me I would root myself into the saddle and send horse forward every time horse tried to root. Not sure how to explain this to a 9 year old, especially one who got "rooted" into the front of the saddle yesterday and was not all too thrilled about it.

    So...any advice?
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  2. #2
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    Have you tried anti-grazing reins?
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  3. #3
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    If your DS is not yet at the point where he can reliably and confidently anchor himself in the tack and resist the pony's yank... then the anti grazing reins are a great answer. In fact, they might be a great answer even if your DS CAN do all that.

    If that isn't an option, there is always the "water skiing" position that the child can adopt, pushing the feet out in front a bit, anchoring one hand at the wither while the other rein is used to correct the pony - kind of a modified pulley rein, if you will.

    Sorry to hear about the, er, incident... gosh that must've hurt.
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  4. #4
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    Mar. 7, 2011
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    Anti-grazing reins, perfect tool for solving this issue! here is a link to the pair we have ( we have a pair for each pony lol) we ride cross country a lot and they LOVE to root for the nice green grass !
    http://www.justforponies.com/anitgrazingreins.aspx



  5. #5
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    Does pony get schooled regularly by a more advanced rider?
    What does trainer have your kid do when this happens?

    Pony has taught several kids to ride and he is probably a bit "over" beginners.
    too bad! it happens to be his job - unfortunately if pony has been allowed to do this for a good while, it will be harder to correct the habit.

    Some days, as the ride progresses, he has almost pulled child forward onto his neck.
    I would not consider this to be a "safe" pony - there are a very few ponies out there that are stellar even without being in a "program" but most ponies are much more considerate of their beginners if they are schooled regularly by another rider.



  6. #6
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    Default

    Anti grazings rains and a smack on the ass if he tries to root.
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  7. #7
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    Default

    Saw an otherwise spectacular pony do this at a show recently. While the smack on the butt works when you're at the house what to do at the show? Evidently pony only does it at the show since I am sure she knows no one is going to smack her there. Can you show in the grazing reins?
    Adoring fan of A Fine Romance
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    What serious breeder would think that a horse at that performance level is push button? Even so, that's still a lot of buttons to push.



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big_Grey_hunter View Post
    Anti grazings rains and a smack on the ass if he tries to root.
    ^^ this - and a good swift kick too boot



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by leilatigress View Post
    Saw an otherwise spectacular pony do this at a show recently. While the smack on the butt works when you're at the house what to do at the show? Evidently pony only does it at the show since I am sure she knows no one is going to smack her there. Can you show in the grazing reins?
    You do the smack on the butt no matter where you happen to be when the infraction occurs. That way, the pony never gets the impression that horse shows are penalty free zones.

    You aren't going to be placed if the pony roots you out of the tack in a class anyway; might as well use it as a schooling opportunity and at least demonstrate to the judge that you can correct the misbehavior!
    **********
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  10. #10
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    Yep, anti-grazing reins (called check reins in driving). We had one pony who was a true stinker. We ran his anti-grazing reins under the saddle and attached them to a crupper...woohoo! stopped that behaviour really quickly.
    "Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc"



  11. #11
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    Yeah, we did the anti-grazing reins for a couple of months. As soon as you put them on the pony stops and basically says. "Dang. Busted". I took them off after a couple of months when he started jumping little Xrails, wasn't sure it was all that safe.

    Pony was actually good for a few weeks then started the root again. Maybe we need to use them from time to time as a reminder.

    He does not get schooled by anyone else, he really truly is a super little guy in all other respects. When I say pulled up on neck I don't mean way up by his ears at risk of falling off, I mean forward out of the tack and off balance. Honestly, if that is the worst thing he does I still feel he is a safe pony. DS fell off yesterday (for reasons completely unrelated to rooting) and pony came to a complete stop and stood like a rock. I like that in a pony.

    As for trainer, so far only Pony Club lessons and instructor is not addressing this issue. To be fair, only really became an issue recently again.

    DS doesn't carry a stick with this pony but we will start that and slap the grazing reins on again for a while.

    Thanks all for the advice.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  12. #12
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    we use them EVERY ride, they come off as we enter the show ring and go back on as we come out of the ring, the 3-10 minutes we are in the ring showing are never an issue but we don't want pony to remember she CAN root so they go RIGHT BACK ON



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trakehner View Post
    Yep, anti-grazing reins (called check reins in driving). We had one pony who was a true stinker. We ran his anti-grazing reins under the saddle and attached them to a crupper...woohoo! stopped that behaviour really quickly.

    I'd be scared of the law of unintended consequences coming into play there!!

    I can imagine it was very effective though
    I'm not sure if I grew out of stupid or ran out of brave.

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  14. #14
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    My daughter's mare can root. It usually means it's time for a "big girl" ride by me or one of the bigger kids who can sit up and be a bit stronger. That's when having a bit more, uh, counterbalance helps. It also helps if she keeps her moving forward a bit more.
    A proud friend of bar.ka.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trakehner View Post
    Yep, anti-grazing reins (called check reins in driving). We had one pony who was a true stinker. We ran his anti-grazing reins under the saddle and attached them to a crupper...woohoo! stopped that behaviour really quickly.
    I bet that was interesting the first time you put them on like that!



  16. #16
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    At my old barn they used to tie a piece of baling twine from bit, through the loop where the brow band connects to the bridle and then to the D ring on the saddle. A cheap alternative, and it will break away if it has to.
    Currently blogging for Chronicle of the Horse. Articles can be found here: http://www.chronofhorse.com/category...ryan-lefkowitz



  17. #17
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    You can also teach your child how to bridge their reins and then plant that down on the neck. When the pony roots...he will only root against himself and your child should be able to hold their position and KICK. A more useful skill to teach them that they can use for the rest of their riding careers.


    I think there have been threads...probably in the eventing forum....explaining how to bridge your reins. It is something that would take me seconds to show you how to do...not sure I can explain it easily in writing but will try. Basically, you have the reins crossed over the neck, with one hand you grab the x in the middle (so holding both reins). Then flip your pinky over the rein that runs to the bit on the same side as that hand. For a single bridge, you would just reach forward with the opposite hand and grab the rein in front of the x on the same side as that hand (this would now be the hand not holding the bridge while the other is holding both reins). For a double bridge, they are both holding the "x". It sounds a lot more complicated than it is. I can pick up and bridge my reins while galloping a horse....to give you an idea about how easy it is to do.


    ETA: Quick google search found this decent description.

    http://ezinearticles.com/?The-How-An...eins&id=445943
    Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; May. 18, 2011 at 06:02 PM.
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  18. #18
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    What type of bit are you using? A jointed snaffle in many folk's opinions is not a bit for a beginner. They can pinch and really are for more experienced hands. Rooting pulls the reins out of the hands and releases the pressure of the bit.

    I would try a mullen or a ported bit or at the very least a french link to spread the pressure out over a greater area.

    Perhaps this will make the pony more comfortable.

    We had a pony that yanked my son right out of the saddle and over his head.

    Once we lightened up the bit he quit doing it....



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    Does pony get schooled regularly by a more advanced rider?
    What does trainer have your kid do when this happens?



    too bad! it happens to be his job - unfortunately if pony has been allowed to do this for a good while, it will be harder to correct the habit.


    I would not consider this to be a "safe" pony - there are a very few ponies out there that are stellar even without being in a "program" but most ponies are much more considerate of their beginners if they are schooled regularly by another rider.
    took the words right out of my mouth, i was going to say something on the same lines

    this pony isnt a novice by that i mean a beginners pony so hes the wrong pony for the child abilites as this pony is not a novice ride, in other words in more of a 2nd pony than a 1st or beginners pony

    a pony with this type of vice as it is vice can be unseating, and hard to deal with for a kid, od his stamp and ability and no amount of grass reins are going to knock it on the head as the pony has being doing it for yonks and tking advantage of his riders

    1-- ponies can be strong and even the littlest can be stronger than an adult human being
    2- a child is 1/4 of pint compare to an adult, they have ankles at the bottom of a saddle flap where as comapre to an adult we have a calf - and then ankle

    3- a child when riding hasnt got the strength to pull a horse up let alone a pony double or treble is hieght and size
    4- rooting can become very dangerous
    5- it can also un nearve and make the rider loss his confidence very quickly in a short sucession

    6- my advice wouldbe to find something a little more encouraging for the little boy,,

    7- what you can do if no rider, is to put the pony on the long lines and re edcuate and re trian him, and it wont happen over night or next week or

    next month, to re - hab a pony when it has a naughty habit like this one takes skill and thats if it can be cured because i will tell you now big or

    small the risk is always there once a dirty stopper always a dirty stopper if it cant be ridden by another as in no jockey due to size of the pony
    there are no garantees with dirty stoppers ,

    1st on the lines then on the lunge with a decent rider but as there is a but
    there is an eliment of risk to the rider always
    and your responisble to that rider as they are riding a nuaghty pony
    and you must be aware of the potential damage what can be done to that rider at anytime


    and if your going to keep him long rein him to death - going here there and everywhere its only then that you will find out how hard it is to ride the pony, as if your good at long reiing you can feel it and work him pass the point when you do, if your rubbish at long reining then the pony will do exactly what he does with the little rider in your hands and put his head down and tank off, or do a dirty stop
    then it will become apparant as to what your little boy going through
    8- if your keeping change the bit bit from a snaffle to kimblewick or if nessacary and in this case i would, use a double bridle, of which you will have to teach you lad how to ride in a double bridle , its stronger and it will help him hold his head up, using two reins more like a handle so he has hold of his head so he cant put it down but again that take skill to teach and learn how to ride in a double bridle but dont be thinking its not done on a child or cant be done becuase it can, and he would much more control and learn a very good lesson early in life of how to use a double bridle but you would need a dressage trianer if you cant explain or do it properly yourself


    9- really if you want a bit of decent advice find another pony before your lad gets hurt as dirty stops are not funny and he can easily come off as there nothing he can do to stay in the saddle as hes small and light like a feather on this ponies back, and no way would i put a child of mine on something that could seriously hurt my child
    this is not a beginners pony no matter whats been said to you
    your child safety come 1st - period
    Last edited by goeslikestink; May. 18, 2011 at 08:33 PM.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trakehner View Post
    Yep, anti-grazing reins (called check reins in driving). We had one pony who was a true stinker. We ran his anti-grazing reins under the saddle and attached them to a crupper...woohoo! stopped that behaviour really quickly.
    Agree with this. Have seen more than one rotten pony turned around by this combo! Well, as much as a rotten pony can be turned around...



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