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  1. #21
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    University of Pennsylvania at New Bolton Center. I do know Texas A&M hired a farrier a few years ago, so I am sure that school also offers some rotations with the farrier. I do not know about the other schools, but I do know they do not employ a full time farrier.



  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by reillyshoe View Post
    University of Pennsylvania at New Bolton Center. I do know Texas A&M hired a farrier a few years ago, so I am sure that school also offers some rotations with the farrier. I do not know about the other schools, but I do know they do not employ a full time farrier.
    That would make sense with New Bolten. Thanks for the info! I have family in that area so was going to try and visit anyway but that sounds like a great program. I was accepted to Penn when I applied and turned it down in favor of a program I could afford but it was hard to say no to New Bolten!



  3. #23
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    Feb. 17, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by WorthTheWait95 View Post
    That's fantastic! Which schools? I can only speak for my own experience at my school in addition to my friends at Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Ohio, Kansas and Colorado. CSU does have the EORC but according to my fourth year friend there it sounds like they get as little in the farrier department as we do. I'm in the process of booking some externships and I know some school's offer them for students at different vet schools...definitely the type of experience I'm looking for.
    Absolutely Penn! I'm a 4th yr now and I have to say that we learn a ton about foot mechanics/dynamics (and the importance of anatomy) and you can do rotations in podology and see everything from routine shoeing to therapeutics (with glue-ons or nails depending on the horse). Podology is also rightly incorporated into the sports medicine rotation. That being said, I think one of the most important things I've learned is that I could not presume to do what a great farrier can do and having a great relationship with a talented farrier is an immeasurable asset. So...make friends



  4. #24
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    May. 18, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by kWb View Post
    Absolutely Penn! I'm a 4th yr now and I have to say that we learn a ton about foot mechanics/dynamics (and the importance of anatomy) and you can do rotations in podology and see everything from routine shoeing to therapeutics (with glue-ons or nails depending on the horse). Podology is also rightly incorporated into the sports medicine rotation. That being said, I think one of the most important things I've learned is that I could not presume to do what a great farrier can do and having a great relationship with a talented farrier is an immeasurable asset. So...make friends
    hmmmm I guess it depends on what school you go to and what there concentration is in. It is good to know when looking for programs!



  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by LoveAllHorses View Post
    Hey everyone,

    I am new to this forum and I am not a horse expert by any means. I have never owned a horse but I am looking into going into equine veterinary medicine.

    My question has to do with horseshoes that are held on with glue. Is this better for the hoof for horses with lameness issues? I just read an article about how this new glue on horseshoes was the best thing thats ever happened to hoof care. I was wondering what everyones opinion on this was.
    My horse has been wearing glue on shoes for over a year now and he has never been so sound. It is important that you have a farrier that knows what they are doing and they cost more but they last longer especially when you factor in vet bills for lameness. There are not many farriers that know how to do this and it is so important to get someone who has experience in shoeing with these shoes specifically.



  6. #26

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    Here is a link to the shoes my horse wears.
    http://www.noanvil.com/trainers/bpf/



  7. #27
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by WorthTheWait95 View Post
    That's fantastic! Which schools? I can only speak for my own experience at my school in addition to my friends at Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Ohio, Kansas and Colorado. CSU does have the EORC but according to my fourth year friend there it sounds like they get as little in the farrier department as we do. I'm in the process of booking some externships and I know some school's offer them for students at different vet schools...definitely the type of experience I'm looking for.
    You might look here for an externship.

    http://www.roodandriddle.com/


    Kentucky Horseshoeing School trains a lot of veterinarians. Their director Mitch Taylor is one of the top anatomists in the hoof care industry.

    And it wouldn't hurt to spend some time at New Bolton with Pat Reilly learning about some of the more high tech stuff done in his clinic.

    If you aren't too busy this week, head to Cincinnati and check out the International Hoof Care Summit - where you will get to meet all of the folks listed above . . .



  8. #28
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    Mar. 9, 2003
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    I'm in vet school (equine concentration), and there are 2 or 3 total non-horse people interested in doing equine medicine in my class. They teach you all the medicine/surgery stuff you need to know in school, but not a lot of basic, common-sense horsemanship you learn from years and years of being around and having horses.

    I would suggest hanging out at a higher-end facility (or several) with a GOOD, knowledgeable barn manager, and asking if you can shadow them over a summer or winter break. Watch what they do for minor injuries, preventative meds, supplements, feeding strategies, handling etc.

    Do this in addition to shadowing an equine vet. Although shadowing a vet is great, you still won't get that day-to-day stuff that is SO important. They will "teach" you in vet school how to wrap a leg, but let me tell you - the "passably" wrapped legs from other students I would NEVER consider acceptable on my own horses, so learn little things like that - wrapping feet, legs, putting in eye meds, administering oral meds, basic restraint - twitching with twitch and without.

    Supplements and feeding is a HUGE issue - you do not get a ton of nutrition education in school (at least where I am), and no material on supplements, and those two things are one of the biggest things clients will ask you about. Try to educate yourself about the most common feeds and supplements, what conditions would require a different feeding strategy, what to feed foals vs. broodmares vs. pleasure horses vs. show horses etc. I would also learn about the most common supplements (I'm sure the super helpful SmartPak representatives could probably tell you the top 20 or so to do some research on).

    Shoeing/foot/farrier issues is another big one. "The hoof makes the horse," as we all know, and you get VERY VERY little basic hoof care/farrier info in school. My favorite book is:

    http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Equ...4&cm_mmca2=pla

    It's an invaluable resource for all veterinary hoof-related issues and has some great info on basic trimming/shoeing information. I did not get this book through my curriculum - just picked it up to read on my own because it looked super interesting.

    I would also get an idea of what a good barn manager keeps stocked in her medicine cabinet. Learn the reasons an owner/manager would use the most common drugs - off the top of my head probably bute, banamine, penicillin/gentamicin combo, metronidazole, ace, dormosedan, xylazine, basic GI drugs (ranitidine, cimetidine, omeprazole, sucralfate etc). Horse people are notorious "druggies" (in the BEST possible way, of course), and a lot of the time you really have to ASK clients what their horse is on/has had/what they gave them before you came etc. to avoid potentially health/life-threatening overdoses. Some people will be reluctant to tell you, although I'm not sure why!

    Any questions, feel free to PM me. You will NOT get a lot of horse contact in vet school until you get to clinics, so definitely get as much experience BEFORE clinics as possible.



  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoveAllHorses View Post
    I do not have much horse experience! Thanks
    This is scary to me because I have experienced equine vets who are not horseman themselves. There is just so much about horses that you can only get from personal experience and handling and not from books, labs or classroom.

    Get yourself to a place where you can get some horse handling experience and knowledge. It will make you a much better equine vet. The best vets and farriers I have ever had were horse owners themselves.

    ETA:
    Just My Experience. Your Personal Opinions Will Vary



  10. #30
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    May. 30, 2013
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    I'm not a horse owner (I have a friend who is though), but I'm at the other end, working for a glue distributer. We have a couple of companies that do use glue for horseshoes and from what I have heard from them, it works very well. No splitting of the hooves from nails, and more comfortable for the horse and longer lasting. The glue seems to hold up very well from what they tell me. If you goolge "glue on horseshoes" or something similar, you should be able to find some of the companies that sell it. Also, go to YouTube, there are some really good videos of the process of glueing them on, at least I thought they were interesting. I hope this helps.



  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoveAllHorses View Post
    hmmm you are probably right. I just did not know if they were using the glue as an alternative for nailed shoes
    Yes, it is relatively new - like 30 years. The adhesives used have been around at least 40 years in other industries. They are just relabeled for farrier use.

    I am sure I will learn a lot more about this when I get to vet school!
    Probably not. In vet school you will be lucky to spend a few days (but usually only a few hours) watching the staff farrier shoe some horses and maybe get an opportunity to trim one hoof while closely supervised. But if you are really interested in podiatry, you are going to have to pursue that on your own or do an internship at a clinic with a podiatry specialty. Bottom line, when you graduate from vet school you won't know diddly jack squat about horseshoeing or podiatry as it is not part of the AVMA accredited curriculumn. The better farrier schools teach a heavy dose of hands-on anatomy and biomechanics with lots of lower limb cadaver dissections. And a graduate of the best horseshoeing school in the country is not really qualified to work on horses unsupervised as it takes at least 4 years of full time hands-on field experience to achieve basic competence in farriery.



  12. #32
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    When my pony foundered, the farrier who worked on her used Sigafoos glue on shoes and they really helped. Here's a shout out to a great farrier, Pat Reilly who is now at New Bolton. Thank you, Patrick, for all you did for Delilah!



  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by chai View Post
    When my pony foundered, the farrier who worked on her used Sigafoos glue on shoes and they really helped. Here's a shout out to a great farrier, Pat Reilly who is now at New Bolton. Thank you, Patrick, for all you did for Delilah!

    Would that happen to be the "reillyshoe" who posted at the top of this page?



  14. #34
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    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Reillyshoe-Don't forget that Texas A&M has Dr. William Moyer. Not that NB isn't very, very,good
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  15. #35
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    Dec. 15, 2005
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    OP, what part of the country are you in? How far along are you in school? Perhaps if we know where you are, we can suggest some ways for you to get more horse experience.

    When my daughter was in high school, she volunteered every Friday night in the spring helping out with the sick foals at the vet hospital. Then, after college, she worked in nursing at the vet hospital. She learned a lot of skills that helped her during and after vet school. It is hard to be a good equine vet if you don't have basic horse handling skills and a good eye for lameness. You can learn everything you need to know, but you need a plan as to how you are going to get the experiences that you need.



  16. #36
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    You guys know this is a 2 year old thread, right?
    Join the Clinton 2016 campaign...Hillary For America. https://www.hillaryclinton.com/



  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    You guys know this is a 2 year old thread, right?
    No it isn't. Only adults old enough to vote have participated.



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