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  1. #1
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    Default Horseshoes held on with glue?

    Hey everyone,

    I am new to this forum and I am not a horse expert by any means. I have never owned a horse but I am looking into going into equine veterinary medicine.

    My question has to do with horseshoes that are held on with glue. Is this better for the hoof for horses with lameness issues? I just read an article about how this new glue on horseshoes was the best thing thats ever happened to hoof care. I was wondering what everyones opinion on this was.



  2. #2
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    Barn mate who is a high-level reiner just had some glue-ons applied. Lots and lots of manicure jokes. Anyway, I sat in with the farrier to learn about it, and it seems very very specific to a certain diagnosed problem, and (BTW) not expected to be permanent. (We see farrier every 7 weeks.) Specifically there was a wall weakness concern that nail-ons were not a good option. Had had some screws in last set but still the concern was that the screws/nails further weakened the wall when the farrier/owner team was trying to build it up and out. The glue-ons were very high-tech and this particular application involved a wedge. Very cool. Not something I would advise people to go out an get, as it was a very specific solution to a very particular problem on a high-level horse that does those dramatic sliding stops and spins that make me throw up. The science of being a good farrier is something way beyond me, although I try to soak up as much as I can every 7 weeks.



  3. #3
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    As someone who has used glue on shoes for a particular horse, I can say it is MUCH more expensive around here to get glued on shoes and also, sometimes, they don't stay on as well due to improper application or application conditions (i.e. moisture, temp, etc.). That has been my experience.

    Sure it is better if you have a horse that doesn't hold a nail, has a hoof condition like the other poster mentioned, or keeps losing nailed shoes (along with chunks of hoof wall).

    Maybe some of the farriers will respond for you. I have to believe there are some negatives to keeping glue against a hoof in the long run too. Just thinking about finger nails and acrylic or nailpolish you never remove...
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  4. #4
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    Talked to my vet about different options for my mare, who hates nails. She told me not to use glue ons. Her older mare has issues holding a shoe, so she tried glue ons. I think she said she used them for a year or so. The horse's hoof was constricted so much, that it actually got smaller and contracted. They're more expensive, you need someone who knows what they're doing, and per my vet, they are a last resort. I ended up having my mare barefoot, shes been that way for a year and doing alot better. My farrier brought up the idea of a hoof cast instead of shoes, but again, constricts growth and the hoof would breath less. If I end up needing support for my mare while, I would go with hoof boots. But shes just a pleasure horse. Im not sure if hoof boots are allowed at rated competitions?



  5. #5
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    Apr. 19, 2011
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    They are typically used for horses with thin walls. I'd get a farrier to look at a horse with glue ons before I would ever purchase it.



  6. #6
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    I had one glue on for my mare when I first got her. She had a wicked case of white line and there was nothing to put a nail in. I think that shoe stayed on for about 4 months. The extra cost evened out since it was reshod half as often as her other 3 feet.

    She has kind of crappy feet and I did consider glue-ons from to time. Usually, the compromise of nails and Equilox worked fairly well.

    My blacksmith tried to snag that shoe, a heart bar with a huge 2.5" toe clip, when he pulled it off. For what it cost - no way! I still have it 10 yrs later


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  7. #7
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    Based on watching a farrier try to get one on during a really cold day they do not work well at really cold temps. (There was a lot of hairdryer, or other heat tools and swearing going on.)

    I would even say he earned the nearly $300 he charged. I think there are special cased they might be warranted, but as a general practice they don't seem very practical.



  8. #8
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    I'd suggest volunteering in an equine clinic with a podiatry practice. There are reasons to use glue-on shoes, but unless you are getting an opinion from a farrier or vet, you're not likely to get accurate information from a forum.

    Just my experience. Sometimes a horse needs them. They're expensive, I'd rather avoid them. Sometimes I can't. The person using glue-ons (or any type of corrective farrier work) really needs to know what he or she is doing. A lot of farriers don't. Again, just my opinion.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    I'd suggest volunteering in an equine clinic with a podiatry practice. There are reasons to use glue-on shoes, but unless you are getting an opinion from a farrier or vet, you're not likely to get accurate information from a forum.

    Just my experience. Sometimes a horse needs them. They're expensive, I'd rather avoid them. Sometimes I can't. The person using glue-ons (or any type of corrective farrier work) really needs to know what he or she is doing. A lot of farriers don't. Again, just my opinion.
    hmmm you are probably right. I just did not know if they were using the glue as an alternative for nailed shoes to prevent soreness or whatever after shoeing. Now I get a better idea that the glue is used for problem horses and not just your everyday horse.

    I am sure I will learn a lot more about this when I get to vet school! I have so much to learn and hopefully this forum will help since I do not have much horse experience! Thanks



  10. #10
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    Have you checked the requirements for vet school, OP? It's tougher to get into than med school, you need a certain number of volunteer hours in an animal related business (vet clinic is your best bet), last I heard a minimum of 400 hours. Best get cracking.

    I would also find it very unusual to see a vet applying shoes with equilox...that's usually a farrier, unless the vet is also a farrier or has specialized training.

    ?????? I don't quite understand why you're asking the question. Time to get some experience, IMO. You might find out you would hate being a vet or are afraid of horses...you never know.
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  11. #11
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    Yup! Vet school is tough! I do have some horse experience but I have not been raised around horses. My parents actually hate animals....

    But I do ride-hunter jumper, western pleasure/western working, paso finos, and whatever horse I can jump onto!

    I am not horse expert AT ALL. I want to learn as much as possible so it can help me in the future. I am not scared of horses but sometimes I do fear aggressive horses or horses that misbehave. But really who wouldn't?

    I want to have a vet career that involves horses. But my lack of experience with not growing up around them is making it hard to compete with people who are way above my level on the general knowledge. Sorry if I ask dumb questions!



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    I'd suggest volunteering in an equine clinic with a podiatry practice. There are reasons to use glue-on shoes, but unless you are getting an opinion from a farrier or vet, you're not likely to get accurate information from a forum.

    Just my experience. Sometimes a horse needs them. They're expensive, I'd rather avoid them. Sometimes I can't. The person using glue-ons (or any type of corrective farrier work) really needs to know what he or she is doing. A lot of farriers don't. Again, just my opinion.

    Yes.

    First, glue ons are not new. I had a horse in them 20 years ago -- and that farrier did a better job than the people I see doing it today. And he did not charge any more for them as he did for nail-ons.

    There are several kinds of glue ons. One is a regular shoe which is held on with a material which is similar to the stuff put on broken arms nowadays. NB: NO glue is involved. This is the most common type of "non-nailed" shoe nowadays. Like any other product which attaches itself to the hoof and prevents the hoof from moving freely and breathing, it is not good for the hoof and will weaken the wall if used for a long time.

    Another method is to literally encase the hoof in a casting material as you would a broken bone. If a shoe is used, it is secondary to the casting component in this method. I was not impressed with having my horse's foot put in a cast -- First it does not allow the foot to breath so the hoof wall weakens, second, on my horse, the whole damn thing came off in 48 hours.

    The third kind of "glue-on" and the only one which actually involves glue is a shoe which is attached to [orange] plastic tabs all the way around. Each tab is pulled up and onto the wall of the hoof and is actually held in place with glue.

    I don't know if they are even still using this method. The shoes were hard to get on perfectly and they came lose quite quickly.

    I had one horse who lived in glue ons for 2 years and they did not come off prior to re-shoeing time (every 5 weeks). They kept him sound, but in the long run we were not doing him a kindness. It hurt him to be weaned off the shoes, but he eventually went sound in nailed on shoes.
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoveAllHorses View Post
    I am sure I will learn a lot more about this when I get to vet school! I have so much to learn and hopefully this forum will help since I do not have much horse experience! Thanks
    Unfortunately you won't get much in vet school. We covered the equine hoof in a 20 minute anatomy lecture and again for about 15 minutes in histo. We had one or two questions on hoof structures on an anatomy practical and had to identify some of the hoof layers in histo. That's all we'll get on the hoof minus a lecture or two in our equine medicine class during third year when we skim the surface of laminitis. Definitely no shoeing talks or anything like that.

    If you're really interested in this stuff you should call around and see if there is a (good!) farrier in your area that would allow you to shadow. The farrier I use for my horses lets me tag along once a week. It has been really helpful and I'm hoping it will serve me well out in practice...if nothing else comes of it I'll hopefully at least be able to effectively communicate with farriers.

    I don't know how old you are/how far along you are in the process of applying to vet school but I'll echo that you need to start racking up shadowing hours with veterinarians and get as many as you can. The minimum to apply to my vet school was 300 hours but successful applicants averaged 1500 hours of clinical experience.



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by WorthTheWait95 View Post
    Unfortunately you won't get much in vet school. We covered the equine hoof in a 20 minute anatomy lecture and again for about 15 minutes in histo. We had one or two questions on hoof structures on an anatomy practical and had to identify some of the hoof layers in histo. That's all we'll get on the hoof minus a lecture or two in our equine medicine class during third year when we skim the surface of laminitis. Definitely no shoeing talks or anything like that.
    wow! I am surprised vet school does not prepare you more for common horse problems like those with the hoof. Just knowing the anatomy of the horse hoof is not really enough to diagnose problems...

    I guess you will get those more in clinics? Or maybe by doing an internship?

    In my area I do not know of any really good farriers in the area. And since I don't own a horse I can't really hang out at a barn unless I pay for lessons. I am sure I will eventually get the experience I just have to keep looking or try to do some networking.... I will get up to speed with general horse knowledge eventually!



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoveAllHorses View Post
    wow! I am surprised vet school does not prepare you more for common horse problems like those with the hoof. Just knowing the anatomy of the horse hoof is not really enough to diagnose problems...

    I guess you will get those more in clinics? Or maybe by doing an internship?

    In my area I do not know of any really good farriers in the area. And since I don't own a horse I can't really hang out at a barn unless I pay for lessons. I am sure I will eventually get the experience I just have to keep looking or try to do some networking.... I will get up to speed with general horse knowledge eventually!
    I'm sure there are farrier's listed somewhere for your state/area online. You can look them up and call. Better yet ask your equine vet for suggestions or a possible contact so you can start learning. If you don't have an equine vet you shadow now then that needs to be your first priority if you're aiming for vet school. Ask the owner's of the horses you ride who they use and see if they'd be willing to pass on their contact info. Start calling and see what happens.

    In clinicals you're at the mercy of what shows up in the clinic in terms of cases/issues you get to see. Rarely do we get anything related to hoof issues minus the occasional laminitis but even then most of those are treated at home or secondary to much larger issues. The clinics of a large teaching hospital are definitely skewed toward the extreme and very weird end of the spectrum. Our equine clinicians give clinical students written exams as well but they are over path, medicine and surgery topics...things that will show up on boards since it's their job to prepare us for them. Unfortunately there is just too much information to learn in 4 short year. There's a saying that vet school is a mile wide and an inch deep and that has been extremely accurate in my experience so far.

    You do have to do externships in school and you can choose to do an internship/residency after graduation. Those are excellent ways to learn but you have to apply and be accepted to them or matched through the match system. For sure get as much experience as you can before school with solid veterinary contacts who will vouch for your experience and work ethic.



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by WorthTheWait95 View Post
    I'm sure there are farrier's listed somewhere for your state/area online. You can look them up and call. Better yet ask your equine vet for suggestions or a possible contact so you can start learning. If you don't have an equine vet you shadow now then that needs to be your first priority if you're aiming for vet school. Ask the owner's of the horses you ride who they use and see if they'd be willing to pass on their contact info. Start calling and see what happens.

    In clinicals you're at the mercy of what shows up in the clinic in terms of cases/issues you get to see. Rarely do we get anything related to hoof issues minus the occasional laminitis but even then most of those are treated at home or secondary to much larger issues. The clinics of a large teaching hospital are definitely skewed toward the extreme and very weird end of the spectrum. Our equine clinicians give clinical students written exams as well but they are over path, medicine and surgery topics...things that will show up on boards since it's their job to prepare us for them. Unfortunately there is just too much information to learn in 4 short year. There's a saying that vet school is a mile wide and an inch deep and that has been extremely accurate in my experience so far.

    You do have to do externships in school and you can choose to do an internship/residency after graduation. Those are excellent ways to learn but you have to apply and be accepted to them or matched through the match system. For sure get as much experience as you can before school with solid veterinary contacts who will vouch for your experience and work ethic.
    Our local farrier just overall is awful. The barn I ride at flies in a farrier from Florida every 7-8 weeks. He is only there for a day but when he is there I try to make it out to the barn, which is pretty far away from my school, to go see him. The problem is that since the barn is 30 minutes away and school takes up most of my time its hard to catch him. The vet that does the horses there is mostly a small animal vet. There just is not a lot around here. I can't drive far because usually I have 8am classes and scattered night classes. I have lots of small animal experience though so now I am just trying to learn the basics of horse care.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoveAllHorses View Post
    Our local farrier just overall is awful. The barn I ride at flies in a farrier from Florida every 7-8 weeks. He is only there for a day but when he is there I try to make it out to the barn, which is pretty far away from my school, to go see him. The problem is that since the barn is 30 minutes away and school takes up most of my time its hard to catch him. The vet that does the horses there is mostly a small animal vet. There just is not a lot around here. I can't drive far because usually I have 8am classes and scattered night classes. I have lots of small animal experience though so now I am just trying to learn the basics of horse care.
    Experience in any field is a good thing....many members of my class were accepted with a lot of hours in only one area. It is possible to become an equine vet without tons of equine experience but you're right in that you'll be at a disadvantage. Horse owner's are a unique breed for sure and they'll know if you're an inexperienced horse person. The good news is that no one knows anything when they graduate from vet school so the learning curve on the medicine side of the things will be super steep for everyone! You learn the majority of what you need to be a functional practitioner after you graduate by going out and doing it. School can only prepare us for so much!



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by WorthTheWait95 View Post
    Experience in any field is a good thing....many members of my class were accepted with a lot of hours in only one area. It is possible to become an equine vet without tons of equine experience but you're right in that you'll be at a disadvantage. Horse owner's are a unique breed for sure and they'll know if you're an inexperienced horse person. The good news is that no one knows anything when they graduate from vet school so the learning curve on the medicine side of the things will be super steep for everyone! You learn the majority of what you need to be a functional practitioner after you graduate by going out and doing it. School can only prepare us for so much!
    It seems scary getting out of vet school not knowing much. Hopefully I will get into some good experiences that will better prepare me for life as a vet!



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by WorthTheWait95 View Post
    Unfortunately you won't get much in vet school. We covered the equine hoof in a 20 minute anatomy lecture and again for about 15 minutes in histo.
    There are veterinary schools that offer much more education regarding hoofcare and podology. I have students spending as much time as a month on rotations with the farrier. Working with and observing problem cases, weekly podology rounds, and hands-on trimming of the teaching horses.


    To the original question, glue on horseshoes are good for a variety of problems, but there is no "best" in hoofcare. Many horses live in glue on shoes for years with increased comfort and better feet as a result. It is also important to remember that there are many different types of glue on shoes, all with different effects on the hoof.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by reillyshoe View Post
    There are veterinary schools that offer much more education regarding hoofcare and podology. I have students spending as much time as a month on rotations with the farrier. Working with and observing problem cases, weekly podology rounds, and hands-on trimming of the teaching horses.


    To the original question, glue on horseshoes are good for a variety of problems, but there is no "best" in hoofcare. Many horses live in glue on shoes for years with increased comfort and better feet as a result. It is also important to remember that there are many different types of glue on shoes, all with different effects on the hoof.
    That's fantastic! Which schools? I can only speak for my own experience at my school in addition to my friends at Texas, Oklahoma, Missouri, Ohio, Kansas and Colorado. CSU does have the EORC but according to my fourth year friend there it sounds like they get as little in the farrier department as we do. I'm in the process of booking some externships and I know some school's offer them for students at different vet schools...definitely the type of experience I'm looking for.
    Last edited by WorthTheWait95; May. 18, 2011 at 09:34 PM.



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