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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    SF Bay Area, California
    Posts
    4,272

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    Quote Originally Posted by alteritup View Post
    Big sigh of relief.

    Just heard back...Trainer and one of her assitants have time/room to rehab him, get him back in work, and find him a new human when the time comes. They'll do this in conjunction with his vet. He is to start u/s work next week and if no evidence of arthritis in June he can go back into full work. I feel like a huge weight has been lifted. I feel like I have a plan now.

    Thanks, CotHers! Ya'll really helped me sort this out.
    I can't imagine how difficult this must be for you. I hope this works out well for both of you!
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...SC/running.jpg



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
    Posts
    4,494

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    Quote Originally Posted by alteritup View Post
    Big sigh of relief.

    Just heard back...Trainer and one of her assitants have time/room to rehab him, get him back in work, and find him a new human when the time comes. They'll do this in conjunction with his vet. He is to start u/s work next week and if no evidence of arthritis in June he can go back into full work. I feel like a huge weight has been lifted. I feel like I have a plan now.

    Thanks, CotHers! Ya'll really helped me sort this out.
    Great news! I'm happy for you. Honestly, I know how hard it is to ask for help with a rehab horse. It's hard not to feel like you are failing if you don't want to hand walk your horse that is rearing and striking and trying to get away from you. But, really, I think this kind of rehab work is very hard on a person who owns just one horse and has a job outside the horse world. For people like us, it is very defeating when your only real horse interaction every day is to hand walk a maniac.

    For people who have horses as a job, that 15 minute (or half hour, or whatever) hand walk is just one small task in a whole slew of other horse related tasks they have to do in a day. It's not as personal for them, and I think you'll find that they can take it in stride and not make it as big of an event as you are (or I am) inclined to do as the owner. I bet after some time walking with (or being ridden by) your trainer, you might even feel comfortable enough that you don't mind taking over some of the rehab. You might just need a break, and your horse might just need some time working with someone who is not so personally invested in him.

    Or maybe not. Either way, you're being a very responsible horse owner.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec. 1, 2009
    Posts
    504

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    I have been in your shoes. Last year I was rehabbing my TB from a suspensory injury. I had surgery and a stem cell injection done on the injury and rehabbed him up until the point of trotting. The horse was a bucker, and one day during some trot work, he bucked me off. He still wasn't 100% sound, and at that point I had stopped trusting him (this was about 6 months into rehab). My original plan was to turn him out (he was still off in front whereas the injury had been behind, and we couldn't figure out what it was), and readress things in 6 months. Well, after 1 month I gave up and decided I just couldn't do it anymore. I posted some giveaway ads and got several responses. You wouldn't believe the number of people who were willing to take on a horse needing rehab. I gave full disclosure of his history and bucking. In the end I gave him away to someone who finished his rehab, and I think wanted to resell him. I know the "right" thing might be to finish his rehab, but you know, I just didn't want to spend that money. At some point you have to cut your losses.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2002
    Location
    where the grass is greener
    Posts
    706

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    It costs just as much each month to keep a nice horse you enjoy handling and riding as it does to keep something that stomps on you and tries to disfigure you each time you go near it.

    Don't think of it as giving up, it sounds like you've done everything right and this horse just does not fit into your program. He needs to go to someone who wants to work with him and you need some nice horse to give you back your confidence and enjoyment of the sport.
    You're entitled to your own opinion, not your own facts!



  5. #25
    alteritup Guest

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    [QUOTE=FineAlready;5609943] Honestly, I know how hard it is to ask for help with a rehab horse. It's hard not to feel like you are failing if you don't want to hand walk your horse that is rearing and striking and trying to get away from you. But, really, I think this kind of rehab work is very hard on a person who owns just one horse and has a job outside the horse world. For people like us, it is very defeating when your only real horse interaction every day is to hand walk a maniac.[QUOTE]

    This! You nailed it! This what was so hard for me to get past. I have a hard time asking for help in general, but for whatever reason asking for help while rehabbing was tough. I felt almost like I was dodging my horse owner responsbility or something. I'm so glad I sucked it up and just did it.

    I have decided to work with the trainer to rehab him, but I have also posted him. Should he find a great home right now while he's rehabbing that would be great. If no one is interested/not the right match he'll stay in rehab, and start training again when he's ready. I love this horse immensely, and the decision to find him a new human is weighing very heavily. (I keep thinking, "maybe it wasn't sooo bad...")

    Blah. Thanks guys for listening to me work through this.
    Last edited by alteritup; May. 17, 2011 at 02:06 PM. Reason: changed a verb to its proper tense



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2011
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    566

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    I had a similar situation (though my horse was not nearly as great as yours sounds ) After she had a flexor injury and we spent what felt like forever rehabbing, I just ran out of time and money. I loved her, but I just couldn't provide what she needed to have a proper rehad. Also realized she was just not going to be the show horse I really wanted, and when she was sound again we'd be even further from where I wanted. She went to a great home and I'm glad I made that decision.
    If the pony spits venom in your face or produces a loud roar, it is probably not a pony. Find another. -The Oatmeal



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