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  1. #41
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
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    5,552

    Default

    With any great good fortune, because we are all well informed and can take appropriate action, this should get shut down quite quickly.

    I'm in Utah. Apparently the State Vet will make an announcement on Wednesday. We are being very cautious right now, though we don't seem to have had any fatalities yet as far as I can acertain. My vet seems to be recommending a conservative approach until we know how things pan out, too.



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2004
    Location
    Back in the 'nati
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    3,141



  3. #43
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2008
    Posts
    6

    Default Wow not Rhino but Equine Herpesvirus

    Yesterday at the equine hospital in Weatherford, TX I was met in the parking lot. Horses were checked prior to unloading. Horses were not to be unloaded until the Vet came out and started the exam. The exam room was powerwashed after each exam was finished. The Tech was to ensure our horses were loaded directly after leaving the exam room.

    I have been in the horse world my entire life and am married to a Vet and have never seen this type of protocol followed before. The tight protocol was to ensure the disease does not spread. He said as of yesterday 8 horses have been put down because of the virus, and several horses have been sent to A&M as a precaution. Colorado State is not accepting new equine patients.

    Overreaction? I am glad I use a facility that takes this type of precaution. EHV1 is nasty, air born and no vaccine is available for this strain.



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2007
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    271

    Default

    http://www.equinechronicle.com/break...d-to-know.html

    This article states a farm in NJ had 6 horse contract EHV-1 in April before the Cutting horse event in Utah.

    While I'm not panicking, I'm certainly taking precaution and getting the word out. It is better to make sure horse people are aware and actively trying to prevent exposure than not.



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2008
    Posts
    532

    Default

    From Nebraska State Vet :

    http://blogs.equisearch.com/horsehea...pes-virus-ehv/

    Five farms quarantined.


    I think this is a great example why we do NOT need a horse identification system. Word travels very fast these days. People can be warned and then take proper precautions. No need to have the gov't do it for us.



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2003
    Location
    North Texas, US
    Posts
    2,114

    Default URGENT PLEASE READ: EHV1 OUTBREAK

    The thread about the rhino outbreak is incorrect and is actually a neurological type of EHV1!!

    From my trainer:
    Yesterday at the equine hospital in Weatherford, TX I was met in the parking lot. Horses were checked prior to unloading. Horses were not to be unloaded until the Vet came out and started the exam. The exam room was powerwashed after each exam was finished. The Tech was to ensure our horses were loaded directly after leaving the exam room.

    I have been in the horse world my entire life and am married to a Vet and have never seen this type of protocol followed before. The tight protocol was to ensure the disease does not spread. He said as of yesterday 8 horses have been put down because of the virus, and several horses have been sent to A&M as a precaution. Colorado State is not accepting new equine patients.

    Overreaction? I am glad I use a facility that takes this type of precaution. EHV1 is nasty, air born and no vaccine is available for this strain.



    *************

    Please, please be careful. This spreading very quickly and the reporting mechanisms are not up to date. We were supposed to have a clinic this weekend and we cancelled it this morning because a couple of horses have been to shows in the last week or so.

    Please feel free to cross post.
    www.debracysporthorses.com
    Home of Sea Accounts xx
    AHS/HV, ATA, GOV, RPSI, JC, AQHA, APHA, APtHA
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  7. #47
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2000
    Posts
    8,909

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    Here is the update from TEVA via my vet:

    An outbreak of Equine Herpes Myeloencephalopathy (EHM) (neurological form of EHV-1) has been traced to horses who attended the NCHA's Western National Championships in Odgen, Utah on April 30 - May 8, 2011. Affected horses have been publicly identified in California, Colorado, and Washington. The University of Washington has voluntarily closed their large animal clinic due to identification of a positive horse. Additional states have possible cases pending and/or are looking for animals that attended the event and returned home. Texas does not currently have any confirmed positives and the state veterinary office is working on identifying all the horses that attended the show in Utah and then traveled to the state. If your clients were at that event the possibility exists that they could have been exposed to this virus. Additionally horses returning from Utah were exposed to horses that subsequently traveled to the Breeders Invitational in Tulsa, Oklahoma and likely other weekend events. On May 14, 2011 in a precautionary move to ensure the health and safety of horses, the Breeder's Invitational Board of Directors cancelled the BI Aged Event and the NCHA cancelled the Mercuria World Series of Cutting event that had been scheduled to be conducted in from May 14-28.
    BACKGROUND on Equine Herpes Viruses - Five different herpes virus are commonly found in domestic horses. Equine Herpes Virus (EHV) infection is ubiquitous in the equine population and most horses are infected in the first few months of life. Following infection with an EHV, the virus is able to essentially hide from the immune system in the lymphoid or neurologic tissues; horses are then said to have a "latent infection." Once infected with EHV, horses are thought to be permanently infected. A latent viral infection can become reactivated via currently unknown mechanisms often during times of stress. Horses with re-activated latent infections are a source of infection for other horses. EHV-1 was one of the first equine herpes viruses to be described. EHV-1 is termed an "alpha herpes virus" that can cause severe pneumonia in newborn foals, mild respiratory disease in young horses and abortion in pregnant mares. The neurologic form of disease is a consequence of vasculitis and endothelial damage leading to thrombi formation, ischemia, interrupted function and neuronal death. Depending on what part of the neurologic system is affected (i.e., the spinal cord and brain) clinical signs will vary. The neurologic form of EHV-1 infection is generally referred to as Equine Herpes Myeoloencephalopathy (EHM) as both the brain and spinal cord can be involved. This form of herpes virus infection can cause clinical signs in any age, breed, or gender of horse. In many outbreaks (~80%) of the neurologic disease a specific mutatation of the DNA polymerase gene can be identified.


    TRANSMISSION: Horse to horse transmission of the herpes viruses is significant when horses are kept in close contact. Contaminated equipment (e.g., water buckets, water hose handles, cleaning and grooming equipment etc) can also be a source of infection and people can transmit the virus on their hands or clothes. An infected horse will excrete and aerosolize the virus in respiratory secretions. All horses with clinical signs are expected to be contagious, although horses not showing any clinical signs can shed EHV. Neurologic horses shed large quantities of EHV-1 and should be securely isolated. The virus is estimated to be viable for up to 7 days in the environment under normal circumstances but may remain viable for a maximum of one month under perfect experimental conditions. The virus is easily killed in the environment by most disinfectants.
    DIAGNOSIS: Once exposed and infected with EHV-1 the virus may be detected in blood and nasal swabs for 21 and 14 days respectively in laboratory settings. Virus shedding maybe more transient and difficult to detect in the latter stages of disease and in clinical outbreaks. Nasal shedding may be prolonged (21+ days) in cases infected with certain neuropathic strains of EHV-1. Horses can develop clinical signs as early as 1 day after exposure to the virus, although clinical signs can be delayed up to 10 days after exposure. Typically EHM develops 5 to 6 days after the primary infection. Infection usually develops following exposure to a horse shedding the virus but in a small percentage of cases, infection occurs by reactivation of latent virus. EHV-1 typically causes a biphasic fever peaking on day 1 or 2 and again on day 6 or 7. With respiratory infections there is often significant nasal and ocular discharge, but not a lot of coughing. There may be some persistent enlargement of submandibular lymph nodes. With the neurologic form there is typically minimal respiratory signs, with fever (rectal temperature greater than 102°F) being the only warning. Neurologic disease appears suddenly and is rapidly progressive reaching its peak intensity within 24 to 48 hours. In horses infected with the neurologic strain of EHV-1, clinical signs may include: nasal discharge, incoordination, hind end weakness, recumbency / paralysis, lethargy, urine dribbling, decreased tail tone, and/or head tilt. CSF collection from horses with EHM shows evidence of vasculopathy with a normal cell count, increased protein and xanthochromia.
    Horses that show a fever and any of these signs should be isolated and immediately. Diagnosis of EHM is based on clinical signs and isolation of the virus or detection of viral DNA by PCR. Samples should be collected from the nasal passages and whole blood and submitted for PCR to evaluate for shedding in the respiratory tract and viremia. Nasal swabs can be stored in red top tubes with a few drops of saline. Serum samples should also be collected in acute cases and stored for possible analysis in the future. PCR samples should be kept refrigerated prior to shipping. Swabs and blood tubes should be sent over night on ice packs. California Animal Health and Food Safety Lab, IDEXX, Texas Veterinary Diagnositic Lab, and the Kentucky Veterinary Diagnostic Lab all perform PCR for EHV-1. Only CAHFS and the Kentucky Diagnostic Lab differentiate neuropathic from non-neuropathic strains of EHV-1 Recent vaccination with a modified live or killed virus given intramuscularly will not interfere with PCR testing.


    PREVENTION: For all of the equine herpes viruses, vaccination is not fully protective. An effective immune response requires a local mucosal response, systemic antibody production, and a cell mediated immune response. No current vaccine achieves all of these measures. Current EHV vaccines may reduce the amount of the virus shed in secretions of the respiratory tract, but do not protect against the neurologic form. Unfortunately, boostering well vaccinated horses during an outbreak is not helpful. Vaccinations 14 days prior to exposure is not likely to be harmful, and may help limit the spread of the disease.


    BIOSECURITY: Horses with confirmed equine herpes myeoloencephalopathy should be isolated and the farm quarantined. Strict hygiene and biosecurity measures should be implemented because the virus can be aerosolized. A secondary containment should be setup for exposed horses to control the spread of the virus. Based on a analysis of a recent outbreak at Colorado State, the authors concluded: "horses with active nasal EHV-1 shedding should be isolated in an airspace that is separate from other horses by strictly enforced biosecurity and isolation procedures. Serial testing with PCR may be a useful adjunct to determine when the risk of transmission has been minimized." (J Vet Intern Med. 2010 Sep-Oct;24(5):1176-83)
    If it is necessary to admit a horse to a farm with ongoing cases, they should be current on EHV-1 vaccination and isolated away from the resident population. The neuropathic strain of EHV-1 can also cause abortion and location of pregnant mares should be considered during an outbreak.
    Veterinary care for suspect horses should be performed on the farm as much as possible to prevent spread of the disease. A detailed history should be provided on the movement of the patient, as well as, movement of other horses at the facility. Knowledge of the vaccination history (type and date) is also important. If a horse is showing any clinical signs or has a unexplained fever, do not move the horse prior to an examination or testing.

    TREATMENT: The prognosis after infection is dependent on the severity of the neurologic symptoms and the duration of recumbency. The disease spreads quickly and can have high morbidity and mortality. There is little scientific evidence to support specific therapies and treatment is mostly empirical. Most cases are treated symptomatically, although some practitioners have used antiviral therapy. Symptomatic therapy includes NSAIDs, DMSO, aspirin, L-lyseine, vitamin E and/or corticosteroids, along with nursing care. Neurologic or recumbent horses can be maintained in a sling for a short period of time in referral facilities or in custom setups on the farm. Acyclovir, Valcyclovir and Ganciclovir are drugs that have been studied in horses.
    Acyclovir is the least expensive, but the absorption is poor (<4%). The susceptibility of EHV-1 isolates varies with some susceptible at low concentrations and others requiring levels unachievable with oral dosing. Giving the drug intravenously should improve its effect, but the IV formulation is difficult to acquire. A suggested dose for Acyclovir is 20-30 mg/kg TID to QID orally. A suggested intravenous dose is 10 mg/kg TID given slowly (over 1 hour) to avoid neurologic side effects.(J Vet Intern Med. 2006 May-Jun;20(3):589-94)
    Valcyclovir and Ganciclovir are more effective drug but also more expensive. Based on work done at Oklahoma State Valcyclovir is recommended for prophylactic or early therapy. A loading dose of 27 mg/kg PO TID is given for 2 days, then 18 mg/kg PO BID for 7-14 days. If febrile they may need to be maintained on the higher dose. (J Vet Pharmacol Ther. 2008 Aug;31(4):312-20)
    Ganciclovir may be more effective later in the course of disease. A loading dose of 2.5 mg/kg IV TID is given the first day and then maintained on 2.5 mg/kg IV BID. If an antiviral agent is used it should be given early in the course of the disease, preferably before the onset of neurologic symptoms.
    PROGNOSIS: A recent outbreak in a stable in Findlay Ohio has been described. Of the 135 horses exposed, 117 (86%) had some clinical signs. Neurologic deficits were identified in 46 (39%) of the affected horses. 12 horses did not survive. The authors concluded being > 5 years of age, having had a rectal temperature of > 103.5 degrees F, and highest rectal temperature occurring on or after the 3rd day of the febrile period were the factors most predictive of the development of neurologic disease and death." (J Vet Intern Med. 2007 Jan-Feb;21(1):157-6) Horses that remain standing have a good prognosis for recovery and improvement is generally seen in a few days. However it may takes months to over a year before a horse is completely recovered and returned to its previous level of performance. Some horses may be left with permanent residual neurologic deficits.

    OTHER INFO
    AAEP press release 2006: http://www.aaep.org/pdfs/control_gui...es%20Virus.pdf
    USDA Resources
    http://www.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nahss/equine/ehv/
    UC DAVIS EHV-1 General Information
    http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/ceh/ehv1_general.cfm



  8. #48
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2000
    Location
    Where am I and what am I doing in this handbasket?
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    23,381

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bugsynskeeter View Post
    But I just don't remember it being such a big outburst of public panic.
    You have obviously blocked the memory of the WEF EHV-1 Panic from your memory. I think we had about 30 pages of outright hysteria going on back then.

    It is scary knowing horses have left a facility and could be infected and heading who knows where, but I think they hysteria generally outpaces the actual infection or mortality rate.
    Definition of "Horse": a 4 legged mammal looking for an inconvenient place and expensive way to die. Any day they choose not to execute the Master Plan is just more time to perfect it. Be Very Afraid.



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2007
    Location
    Heaven on Earth--Sonoma County, CA
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    1,471

    Default

    My vet, who is a person not prone to panic, hyperbole, or exaggeration, called me this morning at 7:45am to express his deep concern about this outbreak.

    When I asked him about a competition we were meant to attend over memorial day weekend, he expressed disbelief that it hadn't been canceled yet. Apparently several competitions/venues have shut their doors for now. He also has very different numbers for illness/mortality here locally than what is being reported.

    So now I just don't know what to do, guess I'll wait and see what happens. I've alerted my students, and we'll discuss as a barn what to do.

    Any other Norcalers have thoughts? I was going to go to a schooling show this weekend at a large facility as well, guessing maybe that is off?

    Hrm. I don't want to be running around with my arms over my head screaming, but I don't want to be dumb either.
    Phoenix Farm ~ Breeding-Training-Sales
    Eventing, Dressage, Young Horses
    www.phoenixsporthorses.com
    Check out my new blog: http://califcountrymom.blogspot.com



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Dec. 17, 2009
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    161

    Default Phoenix another NorCal person here

    I have my 6 year old gelding at a training barn near Penngrove, CA and I sent an email to the trainer yesterday about it. He assured me that they are talking with their vet at Pioneer and that they were not that concerned about it. They are western pleasure show folks who travel quite extensively throughout the state and beyond and are in the height of show season, so far they are not planning to cancel any events they've paid entries into unless the shows themself cancel. Rancho Murieta has voluntarily closed down until June 7th which I think is the right thing to do.

    My gelding is not being actively hauled and shown but I'm worried for him as he is in the same barn and has potential to be exposed. He is slated to come home to me mid-June but I'm not sure what to do at this point. I have a 21 year old fjord gelding here at home as well but he is not hauled anywhere.

    Who is your vet in Sonoma county?

    Here's some info from a vet who posts on the PleasureHorse forum.

    http://drtanis.com/2011/05/16/ehv-1-...now-right-now/



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2007
    Location
    zone 6
    Posts
    695

    Default

    I am supposed to go to a clinic with Greg Best in CO this weekend...the one today up in Ft. Collins at CSU was cancelled already (cuz CSU is shut down of course).

    I'm awaiting a decision from the facility I'm going to...but have already been advised by a horse vet friend near there to just stay home. Staying home and not spreading horses around is the best thing for it, no matter how panicky the situation is.



  12. #52
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2003
    Location
    North Texas, US
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    2,114

    Default

    I believe there are now confirmed cases in Texas.
    www.debracysporthorses.com
    Home of Sea Accounts xx
    AHS/HV, ATA, GOV, RPSI, JC, AQHA, APHA, APtHA
    "LIKE" www.facebook.com/SeaAccounts



  13. #53
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2004
    Location
    Sunny Sonoma, CA
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    Default

    In Sonoma Valley here. There are no local infections that I have heard of.

    My horse doesn't show, but others at my barn do and I would not mind at all if some of the upcoming shows were cancelled in the interest of safety.

    Scary stuff.
    Founding Member of "I Kept 'Off Topic Day!' Open"



  14. #54
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,592

    Default

    What part of the info is incorrect? I heard it was the neuro form from the very beginning. Truthfully if it hadn't been the neuro form most likely it wouldn't even have been news.



  15. #55
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2009
    Location
    Southern Colorado
    Posts
    292

    Default

    "The Colorado Department of Agriculture (CDA) issued a statement late on May 13 indicating two farms in Weld County, located in north central Colorado, were placed under quarantine. One horse that displayed severe clinical signs was confirmed as EHV-1 positive and was euthanized May 11, and another horse was quarantined after veterinarians diagnosed the animal as having of EHV-1. Both horses had recently returned from the Western National Championships before falling ill.":

    Too close for comfort.



  16. #56
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
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    Default

    The thread about the rhino outbreak is incorrect and is actually a neurological type of EHV1!!
    What is incorrect? "Rhino" is just an informal name for "EHV1".
    "Neural rhino" is the "neurological form of EHV1".
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  17. #57
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2005
    Location
    Central California Mountains
    Posts
    765

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    Just found this on the Equine Chronicle site:

    The information below was provided to us directly, by each state veterinarian’s office. Although there is considerable speculation about additional cases in some states, it does take time to confirm positive reports before anything can be announced in an official capacity. The following notices will only be updated as we continue to receive e-mails from state veterinarian offices.

    California- There are currently no positive test results for this virus in California.

    Colorado- Two confirmed cases of EHV-1 in two Colorado horses, that competed at the NCHA Western Nationals in Ogden, Utah. Further investigation is underway. Six additional horses exposed are showing clinical signs of EHV-1. Horses in four counties (Boulder, Larimer, Mesa and Weld) are under hold/quarantine orders and being investigated for disease.

    Colorado State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital is now restricting non-emergency equine and camelid patients as a precaution to prevent exposing the facility to EHV-1.

    Connecticut- No exposed or diseased horses have been traced to Connecticut at this time.

    Delaware- No horses from Delaware have been exposed at this time.

    Florida- No exposed or diseased horses have been traced to Florida at this time.

    Georgia- There are no known exposed or positive animals in Georgia.

    Idaho- In Idaho, two horses that were in attendance at the Ogden, Utah event have died. Five other horses are currently under veterinary care. Laboratory confirmation of EHV-1 is pending. At least 26 Idaho horses were entered in the event.

    Illinois- Illinois had two owners and two horses participate at the Utah event. One horse returned to Illinois on 5/8. It is under current observation and is clinically normal. The second horse is currently stabled out of state, is under current observation, and is clinically normal.

    Kentucky- Information/recommendations we are making available to the public can be found on our web page at www.kyagr.com/statevet/equine/index.htm. Kentucky has no horses reported to be exposed to the outbreak.

    Louisiana- Louisiana had one owner with three horses that attended the Western Nationals. All horses are isolated and under a veterinarian’s observation since Saturday, May 14. There are asymptomatic as of now.

    Maine- The state of Maine did not have any horses that attended the Utah event.

    Maryland- Maryland does not have any horses listed as having attended the Utah
    event. There are no EHV-1 investigations, links or events in Maryland at this time.

    Michigan- There are no known exposed horses in Michigan.

    Missouri- “Missouri only had one horse that attended the Utah event. It is now isolated and is being temped twice a day.”- Taylor Woods, Missouri State Veterinarian

    Montana- Sixteen horse owners and 30-35 horses from Montana attended the Utah event, but no cases of the disease have been reported in the state, per a Montana Dept. of Livestock press release.

    Nebraska- We have five owners and five horses involved. All quarantined as of 10:30 am CST today. No symptoms yet and temping twice a day. Two of them exhibited at a local cutting show in Kearney, Nebraska, four days after attending Utah event.

    Nevada- Thirteen horses attended the NCHA Western National Championship. Nevada has provided information to all owners that attended the Utah event and advised them to monitor horse temperatures and to practice quality bio-security measures. We have not detected the disease within our state, yet. No additional movement requirements have been established due to the current situation.

    New Jersey- A horse farm in Colts Neck, Monmouth County was quarantined after six horses contracted EHV-1 in early April, before the Utah event. The quarantined has since been lifted.

    New York- “At this time there are no known exposed horses in New York. We advise all animal owners to be extremely cautious when returning from fairs and other competitions. Returning livestock should always be isolated from the rest of the herd for three weeks whenever possible.”- David Smith- NYS Dept. of Agriculture and Markets

    North Carolina- No horses from North Carolina have been exposed at this time according to a call from COSDA this afternoon.

    North Dakota- North Dakota has two horses listed that attended the Utah event, but they are both under the same owner’s name. The owner has been contacted and we are in the process of establishing the location of the horses.

    Ohio- There are no known horses that were exposed in Ohio.

    Oklahoma- The Breeder’s Invitational, May 14-28 in Tulsa, OK has been cancelled, along with the NCHA event, the Mercuria/NCHA World Series of Cutting.

    Pennsylvania- Pennsylvania has no known horses exposed at this time.

    Rhode Island- There have been no reported exposed horses in Rhode Island at this time.

    South Carolina- There are no known exposed or positive horses in South Carolina.

    South Dakota- “Two owners and four horses that attended the event. No fevers or symptoms noted. Temped twice daily, under unofficial isolation and instruction to call if symptoms are noted”- Dustin Oedekoven, South Dakota State Veterinarian

    Texas- “Texas Animal Health Commission veterinarians attempted to contact all 27 horse owners over the weekend that we believe attended the Utah event. They were advised to isolate the potentially exposed horses if possible, and contact their vet or TAHC is they had any animals become clinically ill. So far we have found no horses with clinical signs and no confirmed cases in Texas. I believe there were only a couple that we have not been able to contact yet, so that is good news from Texas for now.”- Dee Ellis, Texas State Veterinarian

    The District of Columbia- The District of Columbia has no known exposed horses at this time.

    Utah- “Utah, at this time, has no confirmed cases, but we are following up on several suspect cases, (horses with clinical signs consistent with EHV-1 and who attended the event.) There have been no travel restrictions put in place as of date. There may be cancellations of equine events in the state. Horse owners should call the event organizers for the latest status of the event.”- Wyatt Frampton, Utah State Veterinarian

    -Last night, the Western Regional Zone 2 Show and Utah Paint Horse Club Paint-O-Rama, scheduled for May 26-31 in South Jordan has been cancelled.
    -The No Bling/All Novice Show at the Golden Spike Event Center in Ogden, Utah, May 14-15 has been cancelled.

    Virginia- There are no known exposed horses in Virginia.

    Washington State- Washington has 34 horses that were entered in the NCHA Western Nationals in Ogden Utah. One horse that attended tested positive by PCR nasal swab after a temperature rise. Two horses that attended are showing neurological signs and we are waiting the test results. WSDA is sending information to all owners that attended and advising stop movement and isolation.

    According to the Washington State University website: There are no horses exhibiting signs of EHV-1 at WSU, however they will not be admitting any new equine or camelid patients to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, except for critical emergencies, because a horse was admitted recently that has since been found positive for EHV-1.

    West Virginia- There are no known exposed horses in West Virginia.

    Wyoming- Wyoming has nine owners and an uncertain number of horses, (some were shown in Utah, some were on the show premises, but not shown.) All have been notified and are under an unofficial hold order. They are isolated away from other horses. One is a febrile, [has a fever], but asymptomatic horse.
    http://www.equinechronicle.com/breaking-news/latest-show-cancellations-and-individual-state-information-for-ehv-1-outbreak.html



  18. #58
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2005
    Location
    Central California Mountains
    Posts
    765

    Default

    Just found this on the Equine Chronicle site:

    The information below was provided to us directly, by each state veterinarian’s office. Although there is considerable speculation about additional cases in some states, it does take time to confirm positive reports before anything can be announced in an official capacity. The following notices will only be updated as we continue to receive e-mails from state veterinarian offices.

    California- There are currently no positive test results for this virus in California.

    Colorado- Two confirmed cases of EHV-1 in two Colorado horses, that competed at the NCHA Western Nationals in Ogden, Utah. Further investigation is underway. Six additional horses exposed are showing clinical signs of EHV-1. Horses in four counties (Boulder, Larimer, Mesa and Weld) are under hold/quarantine orders and being investigated for disease.

    Colorado State University’s Veterinary Teaching Hospital is now restricting non-emergency equine and camelid patients as a precaution to prevent exposing the facility to EHV-1.

    Connecticut- No exposed or diseased horses have been traced to Connecticut at this time.

    Delaware- No horses from Delaware have been exposed at this time.

    Florida- No exposed or diseased horses have been traced to Florida at this time.

    Georgia- There are no known exposed or positive animals in Georgia.

    Idaho- In Idaho, two horses that were in attendance at the Ogden, Utah event have died. Five other horses are currently under veterinary care. Laboratory confirmation of EHV-1 is pending. At least 26 Idaho horses were entered in the event.

    Illinois- Illinois had two owners and two horses participate at the Utah event. One horse returned to Illinois on 5/8. It is under current observation and is clinically normal. The second horse is currently stabled out of state, is under current observation, and is clinically normal.

    Kentucky- Information/recommendations we are making available to the public can be found on our web page at www.kyagr.com/statevet/equine/index.htm. Kentucky has no horses reported to be exposed to the outbreak.

    Louisiana- Louisiana had one owner with three horses that attended the Western Nationals. All horses are isolated and under a veterinarian’s observation since Saturday, May 14. There are asymptomatic as of now.

    Maine- The state of Maine did not have any horses that attended the Utah event.

    Maryland- Maryland does not have any horses listed as having attended the Utah event. There are no EHV-1 investigations, links or events in Maryland at this time.

    Michigan- There are no known exposed horses in Michigan.

    Missouri- “Missouri only had one horse that attended the Utah event. It is now isolated and is being temped twice a day.”- Taylor Woods, Missouri State Veterinarian

    Montana- Sixteen horse owners and 30-35 horses from Montana attended the Utah event, but no cases of the disease have been reported in the state, per a Montana Dept. of Livestock press release.

    Nebraska- We have five owners and five horses involved. All quarantined as of 10:30 am CST today. No symptoms yet and temping twice a day. Two of them exhibited at a local cutting show in Kearney, Nebraska, four days after attending Utah event.

    Nevada- Thirteen horses attended the NCHA Western National Championship. Nevada has provided information to all owners that attended the Utah event and advised them to monitor horse temperatures and to practice quality bio-security measures. We have not detected the disease within our state, yet. No additional movement requirements have been established due to the current situation.

    New Jersey- A horse farm in Colts Neck, Monmouth County was quarantined after six horses contracted EHV-1 in early April, before the Utah event. The quarantined has since been lifted.

    New York- “At this time there are no known exposed horses in New York. We advise all animal owners to be extremely cautious when returning from fairs and other competitions. Returning livestock should always be isolated from the rest of the herd for three weeks whenever possible.”- David Smith- NYS Dept. of Agriculture and Markets

    North Carolina- No horses from North Carolina have been exposed at this time according to a call from COSDA this afternoon.

    North Dakota- North Dakota has two horses listed that attended the Utah event, but they are both under the same owner’s name. The owner has been contacted and we are in the process of establishing the location of the horses.

    Ohio- There are no known horses that were exposed in Ohio.

    Oklahoma- The Breeder’s Invitational, May 14-28 in Tulsa, OK has been cancelled, along with the NCHA event, the Mercuria/NCHA World Series of Cutting.

    Pennsylvania- Pennsylvania has no known horses exposed at this time.

    Rhode Island- There have been no reported exposed horses in Rhode Island at this time.

    South Carolina- There are no known exposed or positive horses in South Carolina.

    South Dakota- “Two owners and four horses that attended the event. No fevers or symptoms noted. Temped twice daily, under unofficial isolation and instruction to call if symptoms are noted”- Dustin Oedekoven, South Dakota State Veterinarian

    Texas- “Texas Animal Health Commission veterinarians attempted to contact all 27 horse owners over the weekend that we believe attended the Utah event. They were advised to isolate the potentially exposed horses if possible, and contact their vet or TAHC is they had any animals become clinically ill. So far we have found no horses with clinical signs and no confirmed cases in Texas. I believe there were only a couple that we have not been able to contact yet, so that is good news from Texas for now.”- Dee Ellis, Texas State Veterinarian

    The District of Columbia- The District of Columbia has no known exposed horses at this time.

    Utah- “Utah, at this time, has no confirmed cases, but we are following up on several suspect cases, (horses with clinical signs consistent with EHV-1 and who attended the event.) There have been no travel restrictions put in place as of date. There may be cancellations of equine events in the state. Horse owners should call the event organizers for the latest status of the event.”- Wyatt Frampton, Utah State Veterinarian

    -Last night, the Western Regional Zone 2 Show and Utah Paint Horse Club Paint-O-Rama, scheduled for May 26-31 in South Jordan has been cancelled.
    -The No Bling/All Novice Show at the Golden Spike Event Center in Ogden, Utah, May 14-15 has been cancelled.

    Virginia- There are no known exposed horses in Virginia.

    Washington State- Washington has 34 horses that were entered in the NCHA Western Nationals in Ogden Utah. One horse that attended tested positive by PCR nasal swab after a temperature rise. Two horses that attended are showing neurological signs and we are waiting the test results. WSDA is sending information to all owners that attended and advising stop movement and isolation.

    According to the Washington State University website: There are no horses exhibiting signs of EHV-1 at WSU, however they will not be admitting any new equine or camelid patients to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, except for critical emergencies, because a horse was admitted recently that has since been found positive for EHV-1.

    West Virginia- There are no known exposed horses in West Virginia.

    Wyoming- Wyoming has nine owners and an uncertain number of horses, (some were shown in Utah, some were on the show premises, but not shown.) All have been notified and are under an unofficial hold order. They are isolated away from other horses. One is a febrile, [has a fever], but asymptomatic horse.
    http://www.equinechronicle.com/breaking-news/latest-show-cancellations-and-individual-state-information-for-ehv-1-outbreak.html



  19. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crooked Horse View Post
    In Sonoma Valley here. There are no local infections that I have heard of.
    Well unfortunately my horse is in Sonoma County and currently has a pretty severe upper respiratory infection. Everyone will have to excuse me if I go freak out.



  20. #60
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    As of late yesterday, there were 2 confirmed cases in Alberta. 3 cases in SE sask, and a case in BC as well. (can't find the exact number of cases in BC as of yet - just that there is at least 1.
    Quote Originally Posted by ExJumper View Post
    Sometimes I'm thrown off, sometimes I'm bucked off, sometimes I simply fall off, and sometimes I go down with the ship. All of these are valid ways to part company with your horse.



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