The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,249

    Default Car sick collie-X pup

    Anybody know how to help this dog out? He is seven months old and his owners would like to take him around in the car/truck, especially to their vacation home. Will he grow out of it? Maybe withold food for a few hours?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2001
    Location
    up the hill from the little river (that floods alarmingly often)
    Posts
    3,612

    Default

    He may grow out of it, especially as he gets more used to traveling. Our 45-pound lab mix has always dealt with car sickness. It got somewhat better as he got older (he's 4 now), but on longer trips (more than about an hour), he still gets carsick.

    Some things we tried that helped a little:
    -taking a 15-30 minute break halfway through longer trips
    -withholding food the morning of the trip
    -making sure the dog was in a place in the vehicle where he could see outside and move around freely

    I finally talked with our vet about it, and she gave us some Cerenia. It's not cheap (about $7/pill, and our 45-pound dog needs 2 per trip), but it seemed to work for us. We've only tried it twice, on 3.5-hour trips, but he didn't get sick.
    Full-time bargain hunter.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,960

    Default

    Tell then to work with their vet, that will give them something for the dog's nausea.
    Most dogs outgrow it, we had a few with that problem, but they got over it, although have heard of the rare dog that didn't.

    In our dog club circle, we did notice that some cars and more pickups tended to cause nausea more than others, station wagons seemed the worst, for some unknown reason.
    Tell them to try taking the dog in another vehicle, in the front seat, or front seat floor, in the back in a crate, etc.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2006
    Location
    in the garden
    Posts
    75

    Default

    We have battled this for almost 4yrs now with one of our GSD's. What works for us is exercising him 10 mins or so before a ride. We also withhold food until we get to our destination if we have to leave w/in 2 or 3 hrs of him being fed. We have a Chuckit and they LOVE chasing the ball so that gets excess energy out of him. Usually the places we go they play with other dogs and are worn out on the ride home so there are never any issues coming home.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2011
    Location
    the Armpit of the Nation
    Posts
    3,170

    Default

    As a general rule the more dogs travel in the car the more they become used to it. Is the pup usually only in the car for vet/groomer visits? I'd freak and/or puke too, if those were the only times I went in the car! How often does he go for a drive? Is there any fear/reluctance getting into car? How is dog's general car demeanor--nervous? Quiet but pukey?

    Let's start with getting into the car, because if Pup gets in calmly and willingly, future drives will be a breeze. Tell owners that if he's fearful approaching/entering car, to practice approach/entry ON LEAD w/GOOD treats (hotdogs, cheese, etc)....dont allow retreat(that's what the lead is for-no hauling pup to car, just short lead and food reward for progress), but dont drag either. Any step towards approach/entry gets food reward. REPEAT REPEAT REPEAT, IN AND OUT, in and out, until pup is happy-or at least resigned-work for clear progress each session, and do as many sessions/day as they can handle-at least 3/day.

    From there, short rides around the block (or farm), less than 5 min., w/destination being a rewarding walk, run, retreive session, etc., and then home. If they can find a park/field <5 min. from home, head there until it all goes well. Gradually increase time and distance---they can take the long way to the same reward spot.

    If Pup is agitated in car-pacing, barking-good obed. training will give owners more tools to help w/ control...2nd worse car behavior is a barking agitated dog-totally annoying and downright dangerous.

    Withholding food for a good 2 hrs. before a drive is good sense. Owner should plan on drives EVERY DAY ad nauseum (pun intended).

    I drive 20+ dogs/day, 5 days/wk, for the last 30 yrs. (nope, not all mine-clients)- ALL without exception learned to be great travelers. The pukers got better the more they went w/me.

    Best of luck!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    14,249

    Default

    That is encouraging. They tried some meds - he is a calm and low-key pup and does not seem afraid, anxious, etc. Small trips, being comfortable in the vehicle and he may come around. They would love to have a car companion eventually.
    Thanks.

    "All, without exception learned to be great travellers" is the best news!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2010
    Posts
    292

    Default

    Our dog used to love the car but in her senior years, she has started to get carsick sometimes. Creating a space that they feel secure can help- keep seats up instead of folding them down so they can lean on them, and if you have slippery seats, cover them with a blanket or one of those doggie seat covers (bonus.. easier to clean if pup gets sick) so they don't slide around or get stressed out. Depending on the length of the trip, keeping the windows down or cracked so your dog has some fresh air can be helpful. I don't feed right before a trip in the car but I make sure she has something (not a full meal) a while beforehand, since she seems to travel better after having a little snack as opposed to when her stomach is empty. Don't withhold water! Pup might outgrow it somewhat- maybe frequent, short trips to help him get used to it.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 4, 2010
    Location
    yonder a bit, GA
    Posts
    3,410

    Default

    I'm surprised no one's mentioned sea sickness meds. I've tried dramamine before on some fosters that get sick with mixed results, but enough positive ones that I'd still consider it.
    Recently I had to take a dog on a 4 hour trip. She drooled like a running faucet and puked twice. On the trip home, i asked my mom if she had any dramamine; she didn't. But she did have bonine, which is used for motion sickness too. ( She takes it with ginger before boating). Gave the bonine abt 45 mins before leaving, didn't feed the pup. She still drooled for the first part of it, but didn't vomit and stopped drooling after a short while. I have to take the same dog to visit my parents again in two weeks and will probably buy the bonine to see if it wasn't just a fluke.
    Definitely second the recommendation of desensitizing the dog to the car, too. I'll also be taking this dog on short errands between now and the trip, too.
    God luck! It seems not to be all that uncommon, especially in puppies.
    Last edited by bits619; May. 14, 2011 at 11:19 PM. Reason: spelling
    (A decidedly unhorsey) MrB knocks over a feed bucket at the tack shop and mutters, "Oh crap. I failed the stadium jumping phase."
    (he does listen!)



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    Packing my bags
    Posts
    31,950

    Default

    we had a Dal pup, stick her in the truck, 2 miles PUKE
    return trip, same thing....then we had to move, via truck


    vet gave us some tranquilizers (Ace I think) and we gave it to her for the first 2 days of the week long trip. (then we saved it for when we got to the motel...)

    She never barfed in the car again...
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2009
    Posts
    2,844

    Default

    No advice, just sympathy for owners and puppy. That can't be fun for anyone.
    Quote Originally Posted by pinecone View Post
    I can't decide if I should saddle up the drama llama, dust off the clue bat, or get out my soapbox.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 1, 2007
    Posts
    651

    Default

    Our puppy gets sick if the ride is over 20 minutes. Our solution was to put the crate in the backseat (I realize this isn't an option for everyone, but you mentioned a truck and many of them have decent sized backseats) and put him in it. He LOVES it. He just settles in with his bed, bones, and toys and will ride for hours with no fuss. He isn't a huge dog though and we are lucky his crate fits in the truck, lol. Just another thought if that option is open.

    Otherwise I've heard that both ginger and regular anti motion sickness medication works well.. I like the ginger idea but I'm a hippie anyway.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2004
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,704

    Default benadryl (diphenhydramine)

    Diphenhydramine (trade name Benadryl) worked great for my originally car sick dog, and even my normally not car sick dog on long rides. I think the dosing is 2-4 mg/kg every 8 hrs.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2008
    Location
    West Palm Beach, FL
    Posts
    1,376

    Default

    Bonine, Dramamine, and Benadryl are all OTC medications you can use for car sickness (ask your vet for doses on the dramamine/bonine... Benadryl/diphenhydramine is generally 1 mg per lb).

    Everyone has some really great suggestions too about acclimating animals to cars. I'll use some tips for my patients!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2005
    Location
    Va
    Posts
    3,586

    Default

    My last dog(aussie) had car sickness quite a few times when she was young. She also had a few episodes when she was older, but I think those pertained more to an upset stomach than actual car sickness as we had barely gotten the car a block down the street. My current dog(mini aussie) has so far only had one episode of car sickness (the day I brought her home).



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2009
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    420

    Default

    I've had Collies for about 10 years now, when my Sadie was a puppy and we were bringing her home I think she spent about 1/2 the ride throwing up a real interesting variety of dog food, grain, etc, (whatever she'd eaten that day from the farm we got her from!). Taking Collie pups down to the opthamologist, (in a large pet taxi in the back of a pickup truck) I generally would arrive with puppies drooling and with bits of puppy food thrown up in the carrier...poor little guys.
    Some have been better travellers than others, and even Sadie doesn't get carsick now (though she doesn't enjoy car rides), but the opthamologist (who sees the breed frequently) told me early on "I'd never want to be stuck on a boat with a Collie", lol, apparently they are notorious for having bad "sea-legs"
    The very existence of flamethrowers proves that sometime, somewhere, someone said to themselves, "You know, I want to set those people on fire, but I'm just not close enough to get the job done".



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2002
    Posts
    2,018

    Default

    Consider how and where you drive: fast-start, fast-stop, lots of city traffic? or smooth, slow acceleration, slow around corners, consistent speed, etc? try driving your car like you drive with your horse trailer and see if the problem improves.



Similar Threads

  1. Who shoots a collie?
    By LauraKY in forum The Menagerie
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: Oct. 17, 2012, 11:48 AM
  2. Why I own a border collie...
    By spinandslide in forum The Menagerie
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Mar. 7, 2012, 02:14 PM
  3. WWI fiction about a collie???
    By ThirdCharm in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Dec. 26, 2011, 06:51 AM
  4. New Barn Cat and New Collie
    By LauraKY in forum The Menagerie
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Jun. 21, 2011, 10:06 PM
  5. Sick sick sick! :( (Sinus? Flu? Plaugue?)
    By Threebars in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Mar. 20, 2011, 08:34 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness