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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
    Posts
    5,525

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    I know what you're going through! A couple of months ago I had a re-occurring eye problem with my grey mare and my vet kept *blowing me off (*my perception completely). In the end we LUCKED OUT and it wasn't as bad as I thought and the mare has (so far) not had a recurrence but I waited ten days for my vet to get out to see her last flare up. But he's such a super-nice guy I am still a wreck over what to do because he proved to me that he doesn't share the same sense of urgency as me. To me, eye's can't wait and he didn't seem to really care (see * above). I may go back to my old vet because he would never, ever have done that - I dropped him because he has horrible bed-side and he likes to nickel and dime. Then there's a new vet not far....oy. It's all so overwhelming.

    Anyway (back to you OP)......I can't say what is the best answer for you. I would appreciate the good relationship - but I hate that your vet didn't culture for strangles to begin with. D'oh.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2011
    Posts
    139

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    Being a busy solo vet is really no excuse for unprofessional behavior, and unprofessional includes blowing off a client whose horse could have a serious illness. My vet has one partner and they're very busy, but they always return calls, make appointments within a reasonable time frame for the nature of the call, call if they're going to be late, etc. It can be done. Customer relations is an important part of any business. This is a busy horse area with a lot of vets, so people have other options if they're not treated professionally.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2002
    Location
    where the grass is greener
    Posts
    706

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    Years ago I made an evening (8pm) call to my vet for a pretty colicky horse.

    His response, "What are you still doing at the barn at this time of night? Why aren't you at home being a wife?"

    In no uncertain terms, I asked him if he was going to come out or not?

    His second response, "If I come out, that f****n horse better be dying."

    My husband had to get between us when the vet did arrive!

    I found out later that vet was going thru a divorce, but I would never accept being treated like that by anyone. I immediately changed vets. Now, I always use a clinic with multiple vets as my horses never colic or need stitches during business hours!!

    I hope your filly recovers fully and that you find a vet clinic that takes your calls seriously in the future.
    You're entitled to your own opinion, not your own facts!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,422

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    Quote Originally Posted by baysngreys View Post
    Years ago I made an evening (8pm) call to my vet for a pretty colicky horse.

    His response, "What are you still doing at the barn at this time of night? Why aren't you at home being a wife?"

    In no uncertain terms, I asked him if he was going to come out or not?

    His second response, "If I come out, that f****n horse better be dying."
    S.S.S.
    After he saves the horse, of course.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2011
    Posts
    48

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    Quote Originally Posted by MunchkinsMom View Post
    I had a similar experience, my horse was colicking, called the vet, left the message with the service (it of course was after hours), and when he didn't call back in an hour, I started calling other vets in the area. I had no sooner hung up with one that said he would come out, when my regular vet finally called back. And he too went ballistic when I told him that Vet Y was coming out, and I told him in no uncertain terms that I did NOT appreciate being yelled at when I had a critically ill horse. He then apologized, and said he would be out, and I called Vet Y back and told him that I didn't need him. Vet Y was very professional and understanding.
    As an animal lover I cannot understand why a VET who wasnt responding to messages about Colic until an hour later would be upset that you called another vet. I would think he would appreciate another vet responding in his place. An hour is a long time to wait to hear from a vet when your horse is colicing. Its almost a sublte way of putting his personal gain above the animals well being. That is not who I would consider a quality vet based on the initial response of "how could you use another vet" Instead of " I'm glad you were able to get another vet in such an emergency, I was handling one also"
    This is just a general feeling, not necessarily towards the quote but people who go to vet school dont do it to be rich. They do it because they love animals.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    10,134

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    Quote Originally Posted by Beethoven View Post
    FYI: Untrue about bastard strangles and antibiotics.

    Here is one site talking about its myth, but just google it. That is just plain untrue.

    http://www.montanaequine.com/docs/pres_strep.pdf
    Not unture. Read "clinical findings" and "treatment" from Merek.
    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/in...word=strangles

    That strangles is a reportable disease in some states makes something no trainer wants coming out their barn. I have no skin in the OP horse or her trainers barn. Would some trainers try to treat suspect horses to heal them and to keep things quiet? Sure. Would other trainers treat a sickish horse because they are horseman and just trying to do the right thing? Sure. As someone else pointed out, having a clear understanding before you send your horse out is critical.

    We had two large barns in our area shut down two years ago due to strangles. One of my own colts contracted strangles at a trainers barn last year. Unfortunately, it turns out he wasn't one of the "good guys" and he tried to keep the problem under his own thumb. Strangles happens and it is not the end of the world but that doesn't mean we shouldn't be responsible about managing it.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    12,546

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    Quote Originally Posted by SLW View Post
    Not unture. Read "clinical findings" and "treatment" from Merek.
    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/in...word=strangles


    I don't see anything in the Merck Manual that supports the contention that antibiotic therapy predisposes towrad development of bastard strangles.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    10,134

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghazzu View Post
    I don't see anything in the Merck Manual that supports the contention that antibiotic therapy predisposes towrad development of bastard strangles.
    Merck: “bastard strangles” is characterized by abscessation in other lymph nodes of the body, particularly the lymph nodes in the abdomen and, less frequently, the thorax.

    The disadvantage of early antimicrobial treatment is failure to mount a protective immune response, rendering horses highly susceptible to infection after cessation of therapy.
    Last edited by SLW; May. 12, 2011 at 09:25 PM. Reason: add



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    12,546

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    Still doesn't say that.

    What it says is that giving antibiotics may shortcircuit the infection, but after stopping the drugs, the horse is still susceptible.

    It does not say that the horse is any more likely to develop bastard strangles than a horse which did not get antibiotics.

    IOW, if you have a horse in a barn with an outbreak, it's not worthwhile, because as soon as you stop the drugs, the horse will likely get the disease.



    I have, however, on a number of occsasions, administered antibiotics to a horse which was exposed had developed a fever but not progressed to abscessation, but had been removed from the source of infection, and shortcircuited the clinical disease very successfully.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2009
    Posts
    1,216

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    Yes, I had my filly vaccinated for everything, including strangles, before she left for the trainer's barn. She's still at the vet clinic after being flushed yesterday and today. Evidently, today's flush brough up more yellow pus than yesterday's flush. I'm glad that I took her to the clinic as it's clear to me that she definitely needed treatment and waiting wasn't going to improve her condition. I'm also wondering why my farm vet didn't culture her when she came home with a cough and nasal discharge that was't responding to the antibotics.

    I spent a good part of my day disinfecting her stall and my horse trailer. I'm not a happy camper with the trainer who had to know that a contagious disease was circulating in his barn,



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2009
    Posts
    1,216

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    So, the PCR test on my filly came back positive for strangles. I called my filly's trainer to inform know that my filly tested positive for strangles and that it was likely that other horses at his barn had been exposed, and his response was casual indifference! I realize strangles isn't life threatening, but this trainer typically has 300 horse in and out of his barn every year from all over the country.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    16,644

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prime Time Rider View Post
    So, the PCR test on my filly came back positive for strangles. I called my filly's trainer to inform know that my filly tested positive for strangles and that it was likely that other horses at his barn had been exposed, and his response was casual indifference! I realize strangles isn't life threatening, but this trainer typically has 300 horse in and out of his barn every year from all over the country.
    Wow. Too bad it's not a reportable disease.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2011
    Posts
    48

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    Ive heard strangles is like a child getting chicken pox, they only get it once then build antibodies?!It this true? I hope your horse heals quickly without any issues. I'm always anxious when my BO comes home with another rescue. I admire her efforts but it scares me all the highly contagious things horses pick up at auctions and from poor care.
    Anyone, What can boarders do to protect our horse in a barn that is a revolving door?



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2010
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    2,561

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    Quote Originally Posted by emcfarling1 View Post
    Ive heard strangles is like a child getting chicken pox, they only get it once then build antibodies?!It this true? I hope your horse heals quickly without any issues. I'm always anxious when my BO comes home with another rescue. I admire her efforts but it scares me all the highly contagious things horses pick up at auctions and from poor care.
    Anyone, What can boarders do to protect our horse in a barn that is a revolving door?


    Strangles is a yearly event around here..not sure if the wild herds act as a reservoir or what as I never had even seen a case until I moved here. My experience has been that youngsters at about the age of 1.5 to 2 seem to be the ones that get it here...and it has always been mild, always left untreated with antibiotics and always healed quickly. I have had several cases over the 11 years I've been in NV and seen cases at other properties. My horses live outdoors in herd settings so by the time one horse shows symptoms the herd has been exposed...have never had more thanone horse in a group get this. The vets I use (two within driving distance and I use both) have suggested that the vaccine is not that effective, that there is an immunity acquired by having had the infection but that no one seems to know how long that lasts (but that since the adult horses are not getting repeat cases it appears to be long lasting...don't know if lifetime long or just years long), and generally recommend not treating with antibiotics as they feel that it allows time for the bacteria to travel through the lymph system infecting other nodes rather than simply abscessing in the ones in the throat area.
    Colored Cowhorse Ranch
    www.coloredcowhorseranch.com
    Northern NV



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