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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2002
    Location
    Ontario Canada
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    2,195

    Default jump differences show ring to hunt field

    So I went on a hunt last week and am paying my membership dues tomorrow.

    I am totally hooked. Both myself and my horse loved it.

    The only issue I had was that his jump was so much more back cracking over the solid jumps that I found my show ring eq was not sufficient.

    I was told fox hunting requires a bit of a defensive seat, feet a bit more forward but I am having trouble when I practice this.

    Any hints? Jumping was my only issue as twice my foot felt like it was flying back behind me.

    Hunter pace tomorrow, so I need tips.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,821

    Default

    Your horse may settle his jumping once he gets over the excitement of it all and becomes accustomed to the look of solid fences. You are probably sending him nervous signals as well.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    Deep South
    Posts
    14,867

    Default

    Check out how eventers jump cross country.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SCUdp0SFZA
    ... _. ._ .._. .._



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2000
    Location
    Chantilly,va.
    Posts
    10,887

    Thumbs up a few tips

    forget 2 pointing into fences; open your leg and" sink in" before the fence" Does your horse normally jump"flat?

    You will sink into the saddle right behind the [pommel the last few strides before the fence; Practice this on the flat/ over poles until you can do it without changing your horses' stride
    breeder of Mercury!

    remember to enjoy the moment, and take a moment to enjoy and give God the glory for these wonderful horses in our lives.BECAUSE: LIFE is What Happens While Making Other Plans



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2002
    Location
    http://www.town-and-country.org/
    Posts
    3,000

    Default the saddle you use will make a big difference

    calf blocks are not uncommon to keep the pitching forward to a min.
    a one legged amputee in our hunt uses this.
    http://www.chaar.us/products/Prestig...ng-Saddle.html
    pricy but saves a lot of medical costs.

    Ive tried a few saddles I dont know how anyone could stay on.
    more hay, less grain



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2002
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    2,195

    Default

    He normally jumps pretty round hence I was trying to get out of his way on the hunt knowing it would be amplified.

    Slipped the reins and thought 2 point would keep me off his back, we stayed together, and I didn't catch him in the mouth but it sure did make me appreciate Richard Spooners balance.

    Okay so Dressage seat to the fence and if that doesn't work buy the saddle that can keep a one legged rider in the tack.
    Thanks!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2002
    Location
    Northern KY
    Posts
    4,480

    Default Don't think about EQ so much

    as think about R E L A X I N G.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2004
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,178

    Default

    Dressage upright into the fence, but get your lower leg a little in front of you and heel really well down. Think leg position for going down hill at gallop or a drop jump ALL THE TIME.

    If you have bad knees or ankles you will know all about it after a good run!

    I often end up hacking home with feet out of the stirrups to ease my knees.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 28, 2003
    Location
    Wildwood, MO USA
    Posts
    2,600

    Default Grab mane

    Grab mane and hang on. I agree he will probably settle down once he gets used to the fences and the excitement.
    -Painted Wings

    Set youself apart from the crowd, ride a paint horse, you're sure to be spotted



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2002
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    2,195

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 2ndyrgal View Post
    as think about R E L A X I N G.
    So more port before heading out and a hip flask. Gotcha!

    Seriously I will think mushy cereal approaching the fence and just slip the reins.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2002
    Location
    Ontario Canada
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by phoebetrainer View Post
    Dressage upright into the fence, but get your lower leg a little in front of you and heel really well down. Think leg position for going down hill at gallop or a drop jump ALL THE TIME.

    If you have bad knees or ankles you will know all about it after a good run!

    I often end up hacking home with feet out of the stirrups to ease my knees.
    Never done a drop fence... I can gallop down hill though so that mental image does help, thanks very much. Oh and I saw a few folks heading home without feet in stirrups so that explains that.

    thanks guys!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2002
    Location
    Ontario Canada
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    2,195

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Painted Wings View Post
    Grab mane and hang on. I agree he will probably settle down once he gets used to the fences and the excitement.
    ha ha so I was doing it right, I grabbed mane a few times. lol Fingers crossed he does settle by next season.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,821

    Default

    Another thing that can give you a boost of confidence (especially when hunting on formal days and the mane is braided), take an old stirrup leather and use it as a neck strap. Practice using it a couple of times and you'll find the spot on your horses neck where you need it and then it will give you a little something extra to reach for and to keep you from bumping your horse in the mouth. There's nothing like jumping a big coop and two strides later making a hard right or left. You don't want to have slipped your reins, as you don't have enough time to recover them and rebalance your horse for the turn.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,446

    Default

    Also known as, the "Jesus Strap."
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,549

    Default

    Yep, a neck strap is a nice way to really save your horse's mouth.

    I tend to grab some mane with one of my index fingers (before each fence), it gives me a bit to hold onto!

    Also, as an eventer, we have been taught to ride XC with your stirrups "home". That is, putting more of your foot through the stirrup. In the ring, I ride with my baby toe at the outside branch, "outside" I bring the stirrup further back, half on, half behind the ball of my foot.

    Practice really jamming your heel down at the girth, with your stirrups "home". It will help give you a secure leg in the case of trouble!

    And yes, no perching before the fence. Not a dressage seat, but eventers sit (while keeping a bit of forward angle with your upper body) 4-5 strides before the fence. Get your bottom in the saddle, legs tight at the girth, grab a little of that mane, and HOLD ON.

    Sitting before the fence will also help your horse wait for the base of the jump. Don't want crazy long spots over solid obstacles, and usually the other horses will provide plenty of motivation to gallop over the fence.

    Have fun!
    Last edited by Appsolute; Jun. 8, 2011 at 04:45 PM.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,549

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Equibrit View Post
    Check out how eventers jump cross country.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6SCUdp0SFZA
    Check out 3:15 - 3:25. Perfect example of sitting in the saddle before each fence.

    11:42 - 12:18 This is "riding in the back seat". Not pretty, but gets it done when you really need to ride agressively (and stay on!).



  17. #17
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2011
    Posts
    1,284

    Default

    Depending on the jump, riding to the deep spot is a must be able to do. You don't want to be taking flyer jumps over drop jumps. Piedmont's territory has some drops over stone walls that get worse the further out you land.

    The other thing is practicing unrelated distances. If you have coops set on opposites sides of the road, I can pretty much guarantee that they are not set on nice even strides. So if you depend on counting strides ,you better be able to count fractions. 1,2, 2.5, jump



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2002
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    2,195

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jawa View Post
    There's nothing like jumping a big coop and two strides later making a hard right or left. You don't want to have slipped your reins, as you don't have enough time to recover them and rebalance your horse for the turn.
    Was that my problem?? Yes, yes it was.

    After the hunt we were given permission to go larking. There was a series of 3 jumps one down a hill, a tree jump then I swear 2 strides later there was a drop directly to the left side of the landing.

    No way I could get my horse ready for it in time. So I missed it and had to double back... everyone was way ahead at this point and being my first drop fence we walked it, ... slowly.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2002
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    2,195

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Appsolute View Post
    Yep, a neck strap is a nice way to really save your horse's mouth.

    I tend to grab some mane with one of my index fingers (before each fence), it gives me a bit to hold onto!

    Also, as an eventer, we have been taught to ride XC with your stirrups "home". That is, putting more of your foot through the stirrup. In the ring, I ride with my baby toe at the outside branch, "outside" I bring the stirrup further back, half on, half behind the ball of my foot.

    Practice really jamming your heel down at the girth, with your stirrups "home". It will help give you a secure leg in the case of trouble!

    And yes, no perching before the fence. Not a dressage seat, but eventers sit (while keeping a bit of forward angle with your upper body) 4-5 strides before the fence. Get your bottom in the saddle, legs tight at the girth, grab a little of that mane, and HOLD ON.

    Sitting before the fence will also help your horse wait for the base of the jump. Don't want crazy long spots over solid obstacles, and usually the other horses will provide plenty of motivation to gallop over the fence.

    Have fun!

    Dang I have some learning and unlearning to do. Oh well time to practice before fall hunting begins.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2002
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    2,195

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FitToBeTied View Post
    ....Piedmont's territory has some drops over stone walls that get worse the further out you land.
    I know nothing so what does get worse the further out you go mean?

    Goona go ride in the back seat, with my foot home in the stirrup. You guys have great lingo. As for the kneck strap is this better than an Oh shit strap that clips to the Ds? I have one of those already.



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