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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2010
    Posts
    127

    Default Clover?

    I posted in Horse Care as well, but it also fits here. Is clover bad for your pastures? Does it compromise the other grasses? What are the negatives if there are any. Is the fact the horses love it enough of a positive?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2006
    Location
    SE Coastal NC
    Posts
    1,703

    Default

    No clover is a legume, which fixes nitrogen back into your soil. So clover actually helps to provide nutrients to the existing grass. It may spread over your pasture but it rarely overpowers the existing grass unless your horses are overgrazing the grass to the point that it's too weak to compete. No real downsides other than sometimes you'll find that the clover harbors the fungus that causes slobbers. Not harmful to the horse... just messy. However this fungus can also appear on weeds or other grasses in a field so it's possible to get slobbers when you don't even have clover present. Also, the clover increases the overall nutritional value of your pasture since it typically will be higher in protein than the grasses out there.
    "Farming looks mighty easy when your plow is a pencil, and you're a thousand miles from the corn field." --Dwight D Eisenhower

    Boston Terrier Rescue of NC - www.btrnc.org - Adopt for Life!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2010
    Location
    North AL
    Posts
    816

    Default

    I didn't know that about clover, I'm glad I read this post!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2011
    Location
    Coastal Marsh of Texas
    Posts
    1,086

    Default

    Isn't clover high in sugar too?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Beyond the pale.
    Posts
    2,957

    Default

    we usually take overgrowth of clover to be a sign of poor soil or overgrazing. Yes it does fix nitrogen, so it can survive in poor soils, but once established, it is hard to eradicate until the underlying soil condition is corrected. Also grass growing on the same patch will provide a greater amount of feed and better food for horses since horses don't usually need the protein and sugar content, but they do need the fiber found in long stemmed grasses.

    Get a soil sample analyzed and treat your pastures with required nutrients and the clover will be overgrown by the grasses that will then thrive.
    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 27, 2010
    Location
    SE VA
    Posts
    1,194

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SkipHiLad4me View Post
    No clover is a legume, which fixes nitrogen back into your soil. So clover actually helps to provide nutrients to the existing grass. It may spread over your pasture but it rarely overpowers the existing grass unless your horses are overgrazing the grass to the point that it's too weak to compete. No real downsides other than sometimes you'll find that the clover harbors the fungus that causes slobbers. Not harmful to the horse... just messy. However this fungus can also appear on weeds or other grasses in a field so it's possible to get slobbers when you don't even have clover present. Also, the clover increases the overall nutritional value of your pasture since it typically will be higher in protein than the grasses out there.
    This!!! I planted will ladino white clover with orchard and fescue and my horses love it and do not drool.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2010
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    244

    Default

    I no longer allow clover to be mixed in my pasture grass seed (usually it's added at a 5% rate). During drought, the longer root gives the clover a higher survival rate and it can take over the pasture. The white clover can be poisonous. Your attention is also drawn to this article: http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=16959



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2007
    Location
    Beyond the pale.
    Posts
    2,957

    Default

    so almost heaven., you work for "the Horse"magazine or something? can't read the articel unless you buy a subscription or something. Want to sum it up?
    "The Threat of Internet Ignorance: ... we are witnessing the rise of an age of equestrian disinformation, one where a trusting public can graze on nonsense packaged to look like fact."-LRG-AF



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 26, 2010
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    244

    Default

    The Horse is an outstanding magazine with excellent technical credentials. I do not work for them, I use them as a great resource.

    You do not have to buy anything to read the reference. You do have to sign up (all that's required is an e-mail address). If you choose not to join, that's your choice and your loss.



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