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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
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    Alberta
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    3,563

    Default How to get long distance inquiries taken seriously...

    I am looking for a horse. Something specific. I have emailed on two; both are quite far, so mostly I am asking for videos and a little specific info. Got one half hearted response, and nothing from person 2. Don't really want to call as it is easier and cheaper to email and then have the info/video links saved.

    The ads are new so doubt the horse(s) are sold.

    Is there something in how I word my inquiries that makes me sound like a tire kicking kid? How do I make sellers believe I am serious?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    Westchester County, NY
    Posts
    5,786

    Default

    No. Some horse people will only deal with phone calls. If you are interested, just do it. Some pros only like to deal with trainers, so having your trainer make the first call on your behalf might also get the job done.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 13, 2007
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    461

    Default

    Calling is best, but I also think it depends on the seller and how motivated they are. I am selling my mare and I live in CA. I had an inquiry from Florida about a month ago. She asked for little information and didn't even need to see undersaddle footage, but did ask for at liberty footage and some additional photos. Anyway, I sent what she asked for, we have never talked on the phone but I always responded to her emails. She is coming on Sunday to see my mare (I hope!), so you just never know.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2011
    Location
    Dutchess county, NY
    Posts
    905

    Default

    You are serious about looking at horsesfar away and shipping horses a long distance once purchased but you are worried about the price of a phone call? If I were the seller, that would not make sense.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2006
    Location
    Frederick, MD. Canada originally!
    Posts
    2,497

    Default

    As a seller I prefer emails, helps me weed out the unsuitables before wasting hours on the phone.
    If you're serious just state it in the email - I'm actively seeking a new horse, haven't been able to find anything close so I'm expanding my search, serious adult inquiry and include a number. That would be enough to make me believe distance wasn't going to be a problem.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 24, 2010
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    457

    Default

    I would rather correspond through email than over the phone myself, I am much more comfortable typing than I am talking on the phone to someone I don't know, so I don't think it is unreasonable to carry on a conversation online like that.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2007
    Location
    Landrum, SC
    Posts
    1,752

    Default

    Be specific about what you're looking for... include a solid description of your ability level and include info about your trainer (if applicable). Ask specific questions about the horse. Keep your emails short and to the point. And as Sabovee said, it doesn't hurt to SAY you're serious and not a tire-kicker!
    Athletic Horses. Educated Riders.
    www.Ride-With-Confidence.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2007
    Posts
    2,169

    Default

    Just get used to it. Last two high-dollar horses bought in the last few down-economy years, and you'd think it was pulling teeth to get sellers to respond to a legitimate inquiry.

    I don't care if it's by email, phone or federal courier. The second horse, I had my trainer do all the calling, and they blew HER off too.

    I still have no explanation, but my message to sellers would be, that I bought both my ($$$) horses from sellers who replied promptly to an interested buyer. Both were pros, but even some pros didn't reply to my trainer. Hope they sold their darlings.

    Yes, and now we'll hear from all the sellers about the wacky people they get inquiries from, but the bottom line is still that if you want to sell a horse, you do eventually have to reply to an interested buyer.
    Ring the bells that still can ring
    Forget your perfect offering
    There is a crack in everything
    That's how the light gets in.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Hang in there. It can happen with only email. Ive had people fly from AK FL KS CA WA IL and few in between all the way to OR to see my horses with only email communication. Yes they actually showed up. Yes some purchased.

    TONS of response on horses listed for sale email inquires from BC Canada to Quebec, down east coast to FL, mid US, south to CA. Or they see a youtube video hey is he for sale how much? Or hey do you have a horse like X for sale in X price range? The amount of people who have actually picked up the phone to call is slim. Not one of those call only people have come to see horses.

    I dont agree to keep it short. Tons of one liner emails that never hear from again. Tons of one liner emails that dont answer my questions yet still keep emailing one liners. Detailed descriptive specific ones are the ones that have shown up to see horses.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
    Posts
    3,563

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Melissa.Hare.Jones View Post
    Be specific about what you're looking for... include a solid description of your ability level and include info about your trainer (if applicable). Ask specific questions about the horse. Keep your emails short and to the point. And as Sabovee said, it doesn't hurt to SAY you're serious and not a tire-kicker!
    The reason I don't go into too much detail about ability and what I am looking for specifically is I don't want the seller to colour their response to fit my query. I don't want their responses to be an attempt to fit what I am looking for, i want their responses to fit what they are selling. Once I get some basic info/feel for the type of horse I do into more detail as warrented.

    I always include a phone number, and usually my barn name...all they would have to do is google either of those or my email and they would see I own a barn/train horses.

    With the one horse I didn't have much to ask other than if it is under saddle yet, and if so do they have a video. Their ad was very unclear as to its training other than that it was with a pro. 5 days later and no response? And this is a breeder who posted the ad the day I inquired. I see no point calling them as if the horse isn't even started, I am not interested.

    I realize it does sound silly to balk at a phone call but not at shipping, but email is free, there is no free alternative to shipping. I dislike spending money on things I shouldn't have to spend money on.

    I hate horse shopping.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 24, 2004
    Location
    Toronto,Ontario
    Posts
    403

    Default

    If there is a number- call instead of emailing.


    If long distance phone expense is the issue get a calling card.

    I have sold one or two long distances and emails can get frustrating- calling- although may be tire kicker- is less likely, more personal, and a bit more professional- you can get a feeling for age of interested party, tone of voice, etc.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2002
    Location
    Redlands, CA
    Posts
    7,773

    Default

    Anyone who balks at making a phone call should not be considering the purchase of a horse.

    I always consider a phone call to come from someone who is seriously looking.

    Email, not so much, maybe, maybe not.

    I always respond to both.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2009
    Posts
    573

    Default

    It's funny, I haven't bought or sold a horse in probably 10 years, but just recently did. Sold mine via internet ads. Got a million emails, some of them obviously from young girls, others from idiots. Doesn't matter, I answered them all. Got a few phone calls, responded to them all. If you sell for a living, you must get tired of it, but I waitress and I get tired of that too. Its your job. Respond to your potential buyers. If you aren't doing it for a living, you paid for your ad, why waste your time not responding? Even if the person isn't the buyer you want, a quick, polite response will send them elsewhere. Bought my next horse via internet ad. I was shocked at how few people responded to emails. If I was really interested and got no response, I left a phone message. If I left both a phone message and an email and got no response within a week, the horse was taken off my list. I ended up buying from out of state and the seller was wonderful. I am currently looking for my mom and its been a disaster. We have driven over 60 hours, looked at over 20 horses and vetted 1 who didn't pass. The amount of people who don't respond blow my mind. Then I see an add that says 'New Price' on a horse I've called or emailed about several times. OK, so its not sold, and apparently wont if you don't call the potential buyer back. The market is not good enough to ignore prospects.
    Do not toy with the dragon, for you are crunchy and good with ketchup!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2003
    Location
    NOVA
    Posts
    860

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MelantheLLC View Post
    I still have no explanation, but my message to sellers would be, that I bought both my ($$$) horses from sellers who replied promptly to an interested buyer. Both were pros, but even some pros didn't reply to my trainer. Hope they sold their darlings.
    In my experience, the more "serious" a buyer "claims" to be, the bigger the waste of time they are. Actions speak louder than words. If you are serious, then act serious - don't tell me how serious you are. Be specific in what you are looking for and what your price range is. Don't insist on photos/videos of every horse I might possibly have for sale. I am not Neiman-Marcus for you to shop during your lunch hour or a J Crew catalog to flip through when you're bored.

    All the high-dollar horses I have sold were through professionals who were very specific about what they were looking for and what they were willing to pay. Or they were visiting farms in my area on a buying trip and were referred to me at the last minute (in which case we jumped through major hoops to line horses up and ultimately close a sale).

    I had one woman who refused to drive across town (20 miles) to see a horse and demanded a video first. Ahhh, no - not worth the postage.

    And please read my email responses. If you ask the same question again after I answered it the first time, chances are that your subsequent emails will go unanswered.

    And don't remind me about the state of the market....
    Last edited by Bent Hickory; May. 5, 2011 at 06:24 PM.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 30, 2010
    Location
    Alberta
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    3,563

    Default

    I have concluded that if the seller is going to make me work to try to get information on their horse, then it likely isn't worth it. That seems have been the pattern in the past for me.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2005
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    554

    Default

    I always answer e-mails about my horses promptly. Oftentimes, I am in the barn and busy with the horses, so e-mail works better for me. I can answer on my own time schedule. It doesn't take long to send a quick reply to at least acknowledge that you received the inquiry. And yes, I do want to know something about the prospective buyer before I'm about to spend time answering a lot of questions.
    Martha Haley - NeverSayNever Farm
    2009 KWN-NA Breeder of the Year/Silver Level Breeder
    www.angelfire.com/ns2/our_horses/
    https://www.facebook.com/pages/Never...01844536521951



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 29, 2006
    Posts
    1,049

    Default

    UGH! I am on the other side of the story. I am trying to sell my horse and I got a long distance query about him. She was willing to ship him quite a distance but wanted ME to do pre purchase xrays to make HER feel comfortable about whether my horse was sound.

    My one caveat is this. If you are emailing through a site, make sure the seller actually got the email. I have my horse's ad on equine.com and I don't get an email that I have an email waiting there for me to read.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,120

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Oakstable View Post
    Anyone who balks at making a phone call should not be considering the purchase of a horse.
    That is an unwarranted assumption, on either side.
    1- By the time I get home from work, ride, feed and come into the house, it is usually 10 PM. Too late to call, or return a call to, a horseperson I don't already know is a night person. But a perfect time to send and respond to emails.

    2 - I have a completely unwarranted aversion (not as bad as a phobia, but it can lead to literally days of procrastination) to phoning people I don't already know. Not rational, I know, but it is there. Last time I got a phone inquiry, even with the best intentions, it took me 4 days to return the call. When I got voice mail, I basically said "send me an email".

    3 - The last time I bought a horse, the correspondence was almost entirely by email. There was one short phone call after I had already made the decision to buy (but before I had seen the horse in person- this was an about-to-be-weanling, not an adult horse).
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    836

    Default

    [QUOTE=chancellor2;5591499]UGH! I am on the other side of the story. I am trying to sell my horse and I got a long distance query about him. She was willing to ship him quite a distance but wanted ME to do pre purchase xrays to make HER feel comfortable about whether my horse was sound.
    [QUOTE]

    And you said? No I hope. I have friends who have done similar. Buyers flaked.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2011
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    836

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by chancellor2 View Post
    If you are emailing through a site, make sure the seller actually got the email. I have my horse's ad on equine.com and I don't get an email that I have an email waiting there for me to read.
    Yes! I had similar problem with email notifications from dreamhorse! We changed our server. Bunch of people email but never received because lost. Didnt sign into dreamhorse for a while and found 38 new emails.



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