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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
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    Default Anyone else go to the Linda Zang clinic?

    Yesterday my trainer and another student and I went to the Linda Zang clinic at Morven Park. Learned a lot, saw very cool horses riding the tests at various levels, and came away inspired to improve my position and ride better, even at my midget level of dressage.

    I couldn't get over how much detail in the horse's movement and the riders' positions she was able to assess and comment on so danged quickly. It made my brain hurt taking in about 1/4 of the information being conveyed. But I definitely learned a bunch.

    Any other CoTHers there?
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  2. #2
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    Aug. 8, 2004
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    Back in the 'nati
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    Didn't go to this one, but I have audited one of her clinics in the past and had the amazing opportunity to ride with her once. Riding in the clinic was incredible, but I swear I learned almost as much just by auditing! My trainer is having another (private) clinic with her this week, and I SO wish I could go!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 11, 2007
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    I was there. I loved listening to her mostly talk to all the judges who were there. She told them to judge to the training scale (not to the idea that every rider should have a 100,000 dollar warmblood from Germany). This was especially important in the lower levels. Saw horses who didn't have big flashy moves do their test well and receive high score. There's hope for us all!



  4. #4
    Lori B is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    Yes, I heard that too, and thought, "It would be great if judges did what she was telling them to do....."

    It was also interesting to me that she was saying that the penalty for various deficiencies should be different at different levels, i.e., it should hurt you less to have an imperfect halt at training level than at 2nd level.

    I hope to be venturing to a schooling dressage show in about 6 weeks, we'll see how it all goes. (Please don't tell my horse, she will find a way to mess with this plan!)
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  5. #5
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    Sep. 11, 2007
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    I confess. The black horse doing the 1st level 3 test is my boy and the rider is my daughter. I'm one proud mom! That was his best test ever! And with an O judge!



  6. #6
    Lori B is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
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    The shire / TB cross? He was so cute. He looks like he'd be fun to ride, but a little bouncy. I sure couldn't sit that trot. He had wonderful energy. (Edited to add Congrats for seizing such a scary but excellent opportunity, to have her ride there. It would have intimidated the heck out of me, but such a great chance to hear useful comments from an expert.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  7. #7
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    Sep. 11, 2007
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    The trick with his trot is making him carry himself. If his back is lifted it's not too bad. Good for the core. Believe me, if I can sit it anyone can. My daughter was totally cool with this whole thing. I, too, would have been a wreak.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 11, 2007
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    Andover, MA
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    I rode in a Linda Zang clinic a couple of years ago. It was very useful. My horse acted *horrid* and LZ coached me through it and was very positive about us as a team. Once the behavior issues were gone, we had an all-too-brief lesson from her.

    Have also audited her clinics several times and gotten a lot out of them.

    (Thread here if anyone's interested....)
    You have to have experiences to gain experience.

    Proudly owned by Mythic Feronia, 1998 Morgan mare; G-dspeed Trump & Minnie; welcome 2014 Morgan filly MtnTop FlyWithMeJosephine



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2003
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
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    Default

    She was leading a judges' clinic at Chatt Hills HT earlier this month. My trainer was a demo rider for the Advanced B test. The comments and precision of things she was able to pick up on were indeed amazing, and like Lori B, I loved how she explained that X movement should get X score because of X. She would be a little intimidating to ride for, I think!
    Jonah 4:4: And the Lord said, "Do you do well to be angry?"

    With every day that passes, college football season gets that much closer!



  10. #10
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    Jan. 21, 2003
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    Default

    It was also interesting to me that she was saying that the penalty for various deficiencies should be different at different levels, i.e., it should hurt you less to have an imperfect halt at training level than at 2nd level.
    I saw a piece of a video with Axel Steiner, also an 'O' judge doing a similar clinic. The horse was doing a 1st level test, if I remember correctly - or it could have been T3. He entered in trot at 'A', halted at 'X' and saluted. Steiner asked the audience to score the movement. They mostly have it a '4'. He went crazy! He said something to the effect of - The horse entered in a good working trot at 'A', he entered on the center line and stayed straight, he halted at 'X', the rider saluted, and then the horse move one . hind . foot, and you people gave it a '4'??? You're supposed to be scoring a 'movement' not just the halt. Didn't you see anything else the horse did? That little movement of the foot should not cost that horse so many points. At GP, or even PSG, I expect the horse to stand square and quite, but at Training or First level? I would not like to show before any of you.

    My impression of Linda was the same. She suggested to the L Graduates and judges there that they be more generous of most of the movements are good, and that if you continually score these lower level horses and riders with 3's and 4's - as some people wanted to do - that those riders would never come back.

    It shouldn't be about being overly generous and giving high scores that aren't deserved, but the scores - which should be scored to a standard - need to be scored at a standard appropriate to the level. She pointed out that each test at each level has the requirements for the test listed and that it is not fair to the horse or rider to hold them to a higher standard than the test.

    I thought it was a fabulous clinic and there was a lot of good, take-home info presented.
    Tranquility Farm - Proud breeder of Born in the USA Sport Horses, and Cob-sized Warmbloods
    Now apparently completely invisible!



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