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  1. #1
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    Default Dave Ramsey

    Anyone following his teachings? I just kinda started listening to him on the radio, and Im now addicted to paying off bills and saving. I truly think so many people nowadays have no idea how to handle money, and think living on credit is the American way. Listening to Dave on the radio, and visiting his website has given me an entirely new outlook, and I now see an end to my paying out every penny I made on bills and credit cards. Really gives one hope that there is a way out of this mess.

    He's not for everyone, but he's for me.

    And another thing. I think its a crying shame that schools dont have, as required curriculum, classes on how to handle money, on IRAs, and how to stay out of debt. Its doing a great disservice to the kids.



  2. #2
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    Default

    Agree that money management should be a required 'life skills' course. I have several friends who are well-educated and successful in their professional lives who have managed to make a total dog's breakfast out of their personal finances, to the point of declaring bankruptcy. Bankruptcy when you make $200,000+ per year (and have suffered no major injury or illness) just really annoys me .... that is pure stupidity and lack of personal control.

    *star*
    "Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit."
    - Desiderata, (c) Max Ehrman, 1926



  3. #3
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    Default

    I have several friends that have worked their way out of a lot of financial trouble by following his advice.

    I first heard him on the radio years before he ventured into TV. Too bad the politicians and government bureaucrats don't embrace to his philosophy. But then, it's not their money they're squandering!

    I wouldn't place too much faith in the government schools teaching fiscal responsibility. Most of the teachers I've known couldn't make a go of a lemonade stand in downtown Phoenix on an August afternoon.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  4. #4
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    Default

    I like his advise, very common sense and straight-forward. I even subscribed to his site and message boards for a while (for a monthly fee). However, in the end, I just could not get past the whole evangelical Christian thing. As a Northern-dwelling, childfree-by-choice, liberal, NON-christian, I finally just got so depressed feeling that my lifestyle, views and values were so in the minority in that community and actually completely frowned upon.

    I still like a lot of what he has to say about financial planning though and listening to his podcasts and reading his boards did change my attitude about money to a fair degree. I don't follow his advice strictly really, but I do keep a lot of the concepts in mind.
    -Debbie / NH

    My Blog: http://deborahsulli.blogspot.com/



  5. #5
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    Default

    Do you think it would help if we sent his book to all our elected representatives? Their answer to everything is to stick their heads in the sand and up the credit card limit.



  6. #6
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    Default

    You forgot their taking away our personal freedoms.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams



  7. #7
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    Default

    Some days, I find it absolutely hilarious that people pay him to tell them to spend less than they make.

    Other days, I find it frightening.
    *****
    You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.



  8. #8
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    Default

    Apparently, my husband and I are about to embark on following his system LOL! We aren't in a terrible amount of debt, but it's enough to make me uncomfortable. Right now, we're looking at ways to trim the proverbial fat, and while it's painful, I'm sure we'll be better for it in the end.

    Unlike some people, we do not make $200k a year and we HAVE had extensive medical bills - however, according to Mr. Ramsey, we aren't doing that bad. Of course, I think any debt is "bad" except a mortgage, but even that I hope to eventually pay off sooner than later!
    Horse sense is the thing a horse has which keeps it from betting on people.
    W. C. Fields



  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Midge View Post
    Some days, I find it absolutely hilarious that people pay him to tell them to spend less than they make.

    Other days, I find it frightening.
    We aren't paying him - just reading his books and following his advise - what are you referring to? Is there something inherently wrong with his advice to get out of debt?
    Horse sense is the thing a horse has which keeps it from betting on people.
    W. C. Fields



  10. #10
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    Dec. 1, 1999
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    Default paying Dave Ramsey

    Well, I think maybe Midge means if you are reading his book, you have probably bought the book. What gets me is that if he really wanted people to get out of debt, he wouldn't take credit cards! Most of his advice is very common sense like spend less than you make!! Shazzam! This culture makes it easy to understand why the gvmt keeps spending-Everyone likes the idea of spending cuts but don't touch MY deduction/benefit. We all need to spend less as we are trudging toward becoming the next Greece.
    And to [was it Eyeinthe sky?] don't let DR lay a guilt trip on you for being single and childless. I am single and childless by choice but I am a Christian. I think Dave is telling this because it has a fundamental bearing on how he changed his life, and he wants to share that with everyone. It isn't to make anyone uncomfortable, just sayin what worked for him.
    Another killer of threads



  11. #11
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    Jan. 23, 2000
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eye in the Sky View Post
    We aren't paying him - just reading his books and following his advise - what are you referring to? Is there something inherently wrong with his advice to get out of debt?
    Not at all. It's just that it's fairly basic advice, spend less than you make, pay down credit cards, etc.

    And another thing. I think its a crying shame that schools dont have, as required curriculum, classes on how to handle money, on IRAs, and how to stay out of debt. Its doing a great disservice to the kids.
    I'm inclined to agree with this, given the fact that I had to explain precisely how credit cards and interest rates work to an otherwise incredibly smart, incredibly well-educated 24 year old (she attended the same school as the president's children, FWIW). She had no idea she was PAYING to have debt. On the bright side, though, sometimes she did like to pay her credit cards down "for fun" so it wasn't as bad as it could have been...

    Other discussions with recent college-educated 20-somethings in my office have included "No, you really should not rent an apartment for $1700 a month. I don't care if it's 'what they cost' around here. It's still 3/4 of your income for the month and you can't pay that."

    It's amazing how stupid even smart people can be about money. But from what I can tell, the system isn't exactly teaching them about it.
    ---
    They're small hearts.



  12. #12
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eye in the Sky View Post
    We aren't paying him - just reading his books and following his advise - what are you referring to? Is there something inherently wrong with his advice to get out of debt?
    He sells his books and charges a fee for various subscriptions, all of which I think is fine. I think paying to be told things like, save first, don't borrow money to buy something that depreciates, spend less than you make, is all very simple logic. Wrapping it up with God just ups the oogie factor, for me.
    *****
    You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.



  13. #13
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by halo View Post
    And another thing. I think its a crying shame that schools dont have, as required curriculum, classes on how to handle money, on IRAs, and how to stay out of debt. Its doing a great disservice to the kids.
    Sadly, we are a TV culture that says 'stuff' = success.
    *****
    You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.



  14. #14
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trixie View Post
    Other discussions with recent college-educated 20-somethings in my office have included "No, you really should not rent an apartment for $1700 a month. I don't care if it's 'what they cost' around here. It's still 3/4 of your income for the month and you can't pay that."
    Explains a lot about how the mortgage crisis happened, too. I remember seeing a couple making 30k a year with a 300k mortgage, complaining about being railroaded by the mortgage broker. Hello??? Somewhere on the first page of the documents you signed was your monthly payment. When then that payment was as much as your monthly income, just what were you thinkng???
    *****
    You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.



  15. #15
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    Nov. 12, 2006
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    Default

    I really don't understand why people don't even entertain the concept of paying off their entire CC bills each and every month.

    I mean, "paying them down for fun?" (sorry to single your colleague out, Trixie). I thought you were supposed to pay them down. Every month. By the due date. Because, uh, you don't put stuff on CCs that you can't otherwise afford!

    I'm with Frank, though - teaching something as revolutionary as "credit cards aren't free cash" is not something I'd really entrust to the public school system.

    The only debt I have is a mortgage and Dave Ramsey has me seriously thinking about doing whatever I can to get rid of that as soon as humanly possible. I appreciate his insistence that mortgages are "bad" debt to be gotten rid of, period.

    I know there's the mortgage interest tax deduction but there is a serious movement afoot to repeal that, despite fierce opposition from various segments of the housing industry. It may not be around forever and I think it contributes to an artificial market, anyway.



  16. #16
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Midge View Post
    He sells his books and charges a fee for various subscriptions, all of which I think is fine. I think paying to be told things like, save first, don't borrow money to buy something that depreciates, spend less than you make, is all very simple logic. Wrapping it up with God just ups the oogie factor, for me.
    Ahh - we got the book from the library. Oddly enough, we still have those and they still have real books.

    I haven't read his stuff. My husband is reading it. I'm a Christian, so the fact he involves God doesn't bother me, but I suppose if I were not, maybe it would? Or maybe I would "take what I like and leave the rest" the way folks do at AA meetings.

    I suppose I come from a philosophy that all religions, races, cultures and creeds have something of value - if I toss out a good idea simply because it involves a religion I disagree with, I may be missing out on some excellent advice.
    Horse sense is the thing a horse has which keeps it from betting on people.
    W. C. Fields



  17. #17
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eye in the Sky View Post
    Ahh - we got the book from the library. Oddly enough, we still have those and they still have real books.
    I am sorry if you took what I said personally.
    *****
    You will not rise to the occasion, you will default to your level of training.



  18. #18
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    Default

    I mean, "paying them down for fun?" (sorry to single your colleague out, Trixie). I thought you were supposed to pay them down. Every month. By the due date. Because, uh, you don't put stuff on CCs that you can't otherwise afford!
    I singled her out. You are right, of course, but the truth is that nobody ever taught her how this worked. There is no reason that I, as her colleague, should be explaining a credit card to her.

    The mortgage mess is pretty frustrating to me as well, because speculation pushed housing prices in this area well past what I can pay. They've come down to an extent, but people here are still regularly paying more than they should be (1/3 their income/month) for an average house. If you read the paper in 2008, cashiers at the grocery store were complaining that they couldn't pay their $500K mortgage, but it was "just a townhouse."
    ---
    They're small hearts.



  19. #19
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    Default

    Trixie, I firmly believe that (in your market at least), renting is a fine and viable option - despite all the naysayers with the 1940's "Levittown/American Dream" attitude screeching about "throwing money away" and not taking advantage of the mortgage interest deduction.



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Midge View Post
    I am sorry if you took what I said personally.
    Nope, not personally. I thought it was funny, actually. It amuses me that saving money costs money in one way or another. I was both agreeing with you and musing that with the new technology we still actually have libraries - that part both excites and amuse me - I hope they do not ever take real books from me.

    My brand of humor doesn't come thru on these boards very well.
    Horse sense is the thing a horse has which keeps it from betting on people.
    W. C. Fields



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