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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2003
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    Massachusetts
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    5,785

    Default Does anyone ever rescue a horse they can afford?

    Seriously!! I'm starting to think I am an idiot.

    When I take a horse in, I pay the bills. Before I agree to take it I try and understand the potential issues and also understand that there may be expensive issues I do not know about. And, if it is more than I want to spend, then I DON'T TAKE IT IN!!!

    I think that for the most part, rescues should behave the same way - raise money through good business practice, not pulling on heartstrings, not posting pictures of the most severe cases, taking in high publicity cases and then asking for money after the fact. If the funds are not present for that particular horse, then do not agree to accept it. There are plenty who need to be saved, if there are no funds for the current one, there will be an equally sad case awaiting rescue when the funds are there.



  2. #2
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    Sep. 20, 2010
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    United States of Absurdistan
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    Default

    AMEN Sketcher!!

    LBR
    I reject your reality, and substitute my own- Adam Savage

    R.I.P Ron Smith, you'll be greatly missed



  3. #3
    alternative_view Guest

    Default

    Ditto.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2005
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    Out West
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    Default

    Me 3. Do we have a majority ? Gosh darn I'm sorry this mare has been dragged around the country but really how much charity is there left for all the other sad cases. This whole debacle has left me jaded about rescues in general.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2003
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    127

    Default

    Oh come on, non profits ask for donations all the time. It's how they fund their rescue. I work for a large not for profit humane society. We have donations coming in all the time. Do we still ask for donations? Yes. It's part of being a not for profit. If you do not like how an organization is doing business don't donate and if there is a thread about that org., don't read it. It's simple. But bottom line is rescues are always going to need to ask for donations. As a matter of fact it is part of their business plan. There is no doubt about the rescue in question. I hope all this doesn't lock that thread because I'm sure some people are concerned about the horse.



  6. #6
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    Jan. 14, 2003
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    Massachusetts
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by scierra View Post
    Oh come on, non profits ask for donations all the time. It's how they fund their rescue. I work for a large not for profit humane society. We have donations coming in all the time. Do we still ask for donations? Yes. It's part of being a not for profit. If you do not like how an organization is doing business don't donate and if there is a thread about that org., don't read it. It's simple. But bottom line is rescues are always going to need to ask for donations. As a matter of fact it is part of their business plan. There is no doubt about the rescue in question. I hope all this doesn't lock that thread because I'm sure some people are concerned about the horse.
    This is a separate thread and not talking about any specific rescue or individual and not meant to torpedo the other thread. But sorry, I'm allowed to express my opinion and chose not to do it on the thread in question so as not to derail that thread.

    But yes, of course non-profits need to ask for money. Duh.

    It's getting old though - there is definitely a 'rescue' industry - loaded with individuals or group who have learned that the best way to give the hard sell is to grab the public cases and then milk them. It seems these days that this is more often the case than not and that means that when a 'good' rescue takes one of these high profile cases and then immediately asks for donations as would be a normal course of business, they are at risk of being lumped in with the others. And these days the good seem to be outnumbered by the bad.

    I would think that in the current climate, the rescue might take the horse in and provide the necessary care and then use that horse in future fundraising efforts as an example of the good they have done and the types of expenses they can incur -rather than taking in the horse and then asking for the funds right up front before any expenses have been incurred -especially when you do not know what those extra expenses will be or if they will even have any extra expenses.

    Give me a break. Send me the mare. I won't ask anyone for money. I do not have an ideal set up here but am sure I could make it work somehow. Out of my own pocket, without asking for money for all the expenses I'm about to incur. I'm not wealthy but would figure it out. I need a blind preggo mare like I need a hole in the head but would seriously consider it just to prove a point.

    I just think it has become the norm to come to the internet immediately and start asking for money and that is not the best business decision in the long run. For a horse with interest, all that needs to be said is where the horse is and a little update on her, people that want to help will do so.

    .



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Lorena, Texas
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    4,114

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sketcher View Post
    It's getting old though - there is definitely a 'rescue' industry - loaded with individuals or group who have learned that the best way to give the hard sell is to grab the public cases and then milk them. It seems these days that this is more often the case than not and that means that when a 'good' rescue takes one of these high profile cases and then immediately asks for donations as would be a normal course of business, they are at risk of being lumped in with the others. And these days the good seem to be outnumbered by the bad.

    I'll tell you that it can be very frustrating to be a rescue who tries to operate this way. I will use current cases in appeals for money and have done so on this board. However, if I've taken in the horses then we have the space and money - donations made towards their care are asked for and appreciated and frees up other money for the next set of horses in need.

    However, I'm not good at the sob story/urgent GIVE RIGHT NOW appeals. And we often get overlooked in favor of the rescues who can turn any story into an immediate need.

    We (not me or BEHS specifically but rescues in general) are 'damned if we do, damned if we don't'.

    I do wish more organizations would look at becoming sustainable and looking beyond the next urgent appeal. We're working on that - working on developing a strategic plan (will be hiring someone who specializes in this to work with our BOD) and in developing a more sustainable fundraising plan.

    But I can admit (hopefully I won't get roasted alive for that) that it can be frustrating to put this kind of background and hard work into building a program slowly when I can watch others throw out sob stories and get steady streams of donations...
    Visit us at Bluebonnet Equine Humane Society - www.bluebonnetequine.org

    Want to get involved in rescue or start your own? Check out How to Start a Horse Rescue - www.howtostartarescue.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2008
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    Default

    Great post, Sketcher.
    "Aye God, Woodrow..."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2004
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    Ontario
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    Default

    You also have to advertise the sob stories. Look at the Red Cross. They ask for donations for Japan because of the tragedies there... or Haiti... sob stories there too. Don't tell me the Red Cross does not have reserves, etc. The need is greater with small rescues or non profit orgs. and I, for one, don't mind when they give an example of what they are doing when they are doing it.

    Animal focused non profit are really not the only ones using "sob stories". How about Care showing children who don't have shoes, live in huts, can't go to school??? Same thing...



  10. #10
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    Oct. 18, 2000
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cowgirljenn View Post
    But I can admit (hopefully I won't get roasted alive for that) that it can be frustrating to put this kind of background and hard work into building a program slowly when I can watch others throw out sob stories and get steady streams of donations...
    The difference is - your nonprofit will continue to grow and become a financially stable nonprofit that can be a real force in your community.

    The others won't. They'll just forever teeter on the brink of insolvency, and eventually shut down.

    The "sob" stories are there to highlight the importance of the work; and in cases like big seizures or tragedies, to encourage people to dig a little deeper because of a real emergency.

    But if a rescue is using that model as their only source of revenue/method of fundraising..... it's a rescue that is likely to fail or at least remain ineffective. Even the most steadfast donor eventually grows weary.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FalseImpression View Post
    You also have to advertise the sob stories. Look at the Red Cross. They ask for donations for Japan because of the tragedies there... or Haiti... sob stories there too. Don't tell me the Red Cross does not have reserves, etc. The need is greater with small rescues or non profit orgs. and I, for one, don't mind when they give an example of what they are doing when they are doing it.

    Animal focused non profit are really not the only ones using "sob stories". How about Care showing children who don't have shoes, live in huts, can't go to school??? Same thing...
    Don't forget the HSUS.
    I have yet to get one of their mailings that doesn't has a pitiful cat or dog in a crate when they ask for money and we know how many of those they really help.

    I do object to individuals "rescuing" or "saving" and asking for money.
    At least a rescue organization is supposedly set with checks and balances to where the donations go.
    Individuals can use the money as they wish, some are scammers that see an easy way to supplement their income and for others to pay for their "rescuing".
    I always wonder where such horses will end up, if that rescuer doesn't has enough to start with, how will it maintain the horse down the weeks and months and years of ownership?
    You can only ask for donations for your rescued animal for so long, before someone catches on.

    As someone in the horse business all my life, it is standard to get horses out of bad situations when you find some and you can.
    You do it using your own resources, don't expect others to pay for the animals under your care.

    Many rescues today are a way for some to play horse trader, buying and selling, or hoard and have someone else pay for it.

    We used to consider a true rescue those that are helping animal control and sheriff departments in truly neglect cases where the horses need care to get back on their feet and/or find a new home.

    Those that buy and sell from traders, those that use their rescue's name and resources for personal political purposes, those that warehouse horses, that should honestly be called retirement farms, not rescues, those just are not really rescuers but in the most stretched way you can use that word.

    There have been studies about people coming to internet forums and speaking of some need and getting tremendous amounts of donations from well meaning posters.
    It makes those participating in forums feel good, be part of the group, do their little bit to help.
    The trouble, we are talking at times a rather large amount of money being sent and not always to someone that is on the level about their need.

    The rules here for not asking unless someone is a certified organization help some, but too many just still get around that.
    I think that, on the internet especially, it is donor beware.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2009
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
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    Default

    Yup, I have Two Can Sam the mini donkey here. I had zero interest in getting a pasture puff, but when I saw him with his overgrown hooves and swollen knees, I took him home. I really didn't want him, but he grew on me and I love the little bugger now.

    I have nothing but deep respect for the true rescue groups, it's a tough, expensive emotionally draining, mostly thankless job. Then if they become the "Unflavour of the week" on the internet, they just get hammered.

    I appreciate it when a faux rescue is outed, even better if they actually get prosecuted, but really let's cut the real hard-working rescues some slack already....
    Last edited by deckchick; Apr. 5, 2011 at 01:35 AM. Reason: d'uh! Me bad speller



  13. #13
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    Nov. 7, 2008
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    Pittsburgh, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by JSwan View Post
    The difference is - your nonprofit will continue to grow and become a financially stable nonprofit that can be a real force in your community.

    The others won't. They'll just forever teeter on the brink of insolvency, and eventually shut down.
    Agreed.

    (And, on a personal note, yup, I did consider the financial situation with regards to a rescue. Which is why the OTTB colt from a bit back is with another COTHer and not me - bad time to make that kind of financial commitment, didn't want to take him and end up having to sell him or give him away without adding to his value[1] with gelding and training, so no horse for me.) (Even though I have a huge crush on the goober.)

    [1]- This is a personal rule I made for myself, because I really have a huge soft spot for OTTBs and their standardbred cousins (OSTB? OTSB?) but I recognize that most situations they're coming out of, there's a high risk that the horse and I are going to end up being not a good match, either skill-wise or personality-wise. So my goal is to not take one on long term unless I'm sure I can afford to provide enough care and training that I'll be moving it UP the horse-ownership ladder if it has to move on from me.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
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    26

    Default

    There's a difference with an individual "rescuing" a horse rather than a charitable established "Rescue Organization" taking in a horse.

    I'd like to think that both would ensure they had funds to meet the needs of all horses and operating costs.

    I'd expect the former to be doing it as a personal philanthropic contribution. That means they've taken it upon themselves to decide to own the horse and to take responsibility for it.

    I'd expect the Rescue Organization to also ensure they're able to manage (and pay) for the horse while it's there. I'd also expect them to perhaps use the story of the horse to stimulate new income. However I wouldn't expect them to be living hand to mouth and dependent totally on sob stories.

    In the case of the blind pregnant mare, Helen, it seems there's too much moving her about and touting for funds and not enough getting the horse effectively re-homed and settled.

    That's just wrong!
    Last edited by bailey's dream; Apr. 6, 2011 at 04:52 AM.
    non mordent manus vos pascit



  15. #15
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    Beware of "rescues" who use donations for person expenses and human housing and human food. A person whose only job is soliciting funds is someone who is going to use donations for his/her own expenses.

    Beware of "rescues' who say that "they" are the only good people in the area and that everyone else is 'bad."

    Beware of "rescues" who have large numbers of horses who died within a short period of time at their rescues, and who told everyone about the deaths, but who never produced evidence as to how and why the horses died.

    I have rescued horses and sent them to live with individuals. I paid for their feed and vet bills. But I had to move one since the new home was not a good one. The horses I rescued were sound and thus could be ridden when rehomed.

    Some rescues start with good intentions. But often once the money starts coming in, the person in charge decides that he/she is entitled to use the money donated in any way he/she wants to. I don't like to pay for vacation trips or family trips for people who thinkk they are entitled to spend donated money that way.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    15,298

    Default

    Yes, there is now a "rescue industry" in a way there was not when I was a kid.

    That is for better and for worse.

    I stay out of it because I think I'm prone to "compassion fatigue." For me that has two sources:

    1) I know I can't afford to breed willy nilly with the expectation that "someone will buy what I produce." So I'm not psyched for any "industry" that helps mop up after those who do breed horses this way. I'm jealous! I want no accountability, too.

    2) The fact that if my horse needed something big like colic surgery, the clinic would say "Show me the money." If I didn't have it, I'd have to euthanize him. No one but me would care. So sometimes its hard for me to support people what to do the "starfish" thing for one horse when so many more could be helped with the same money.

    Again, it's jealousy about accountability. I don't mind accountability per se, and I'm glad I have the brass set of cajones that says "I'll put him down before I let him suffer." I'd just like that to be more laudable than it is. The "OMG save this one at any cost" makes people like me look like we have stopped short of doing what's morally right. Among horsemen, I don't think my hard-a$$ view is a problem. But try having this conversation with anyone else. Watch the eyes get big and then narrow into unfriendly, judgmental slits.

    Otherwise I'm really glad that some people do do the rescue job. It's hard and (usually) a labor of love, not money, for these folks. If they get a lot of satisfaction out of making their full time job to rescue horses, that's fine by me. Rescues exist precisely because too few people inconvenience themselves enough for their animals.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2006
    Posts
    312

    Default

    Great post!!!!!!! I totally agree.

    If you personally want to rescue a horse, that is awesome but I agree with the OP, pay the bills yourself.

    I am sick of getting bombarded by people who all of a sudden decide they want to become "recuers". My FB page is flooded with donation requests.

    Seriously if you want to help, donate your time, money and efforts to an already established reputable group.
    I don't always feel up to arguing with your ignorance



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    To answer the OP's question, yes but you never hear about them
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  19. #19
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    Jan. 31, 2003
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    I think people do it all the time, you just dont know it.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  20. #20
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    Nov. 15, 2005
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    NY
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    I would like to add, 'do they ever rescue with the forethought that what they want the horse to be may not be possible, and the ability to deal with the horse regardless of whatever 'baggage' it comes with [be it lack of training, lack of soundness, or what have you]?'

    I am tired of people 'rescueing' horses from dealers then flipping them at a sale or on Craigslist or Facebook, because the horse is not something they can/want/afford to handle. If you [a private individual] choose to buy a horse of unknown history from X sale, and it turns out to need training by a professional... guess what? That should be your bill, not the communities. *headdesk*



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