The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
    Location
    Joliette, QC, Canada
    Posts
    4,286

    Default Adaptation to shoes

    I have a friend who bought a young horse who was barefoot all his life, very good feet.
    She decide to put shoes and from that moment, the young horse has started to pull on the reins, even acting naughty. In canter he jumps around and seem he wants to take those shoes away.

    Is this normal adaptation ? I have never heard of such a problem.

    Maybe there is horse that does not want shoes ? Does not need them at all.

    In this case, she decide to shoe because there is quite a bit of rocks in her aera.
    Élène

    Fighting ovarian cancer ! 2013 huge turnaround as I am winning the battle !..
    http://esergerie.wordpress.com



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,498

    Default

    No, that is not normal.

    Did he NEED the shoes? Rocks are not an automatic need, but they could be for this horse, so just asking.

    It's much more likely there are issues with how he was trimmed and/or how the shoes were put on.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2007
    Location
    Comanche, TX
    Posts
    1,242

    Default

    Leena in gray

    I have a friend who bought a young horse who was barefoot all his life, very good feet.
    She decide to put shoes and from that moment, the young horse has started to pull on the reins, even acting naughty. In canter he jumps around and seem he wants to take those shoes away.


    Since you've made no mention of pathology, might one assume the horse will grade a "0" on the AAEP scale after being shod? If so, when a horse manifests a radical change in behavior after being shod, it's most often because the shoes have palliated the symptoms of some form of chronic, low-grade, pathology.

    Is this normal adaptation ? I have never heard of such a problem.

    Behavioral changes after the application of shoes are most often mitigated by wet saddle pads, not by pulling the shoes.

    Maybe there is horse that does not want shoes ?

    Anthropomorphic twaddle.

    Does not need them at all.

    In this case, she decide to shoe because there is quite a bit of rocks in her aera
    .

    In this case, assuming no changes in environment or use, shoes or barefoot probably depends on the integrity of the owner.
    Tom Stovall, CJF
    No me preguntes cualquier preguntas, yo te diré no mentiras.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
    Location
    Joliette, QC, Canada
    Posts
    4,286

    Default

    Thanks.

    This young horse was absolutely quiet and easy way before; I went to try the horse for her, just an handsome one. We know the breeder for long time, we know the trainer, owner knows this horse from a year before, has seen him grow..

    I told her something was wrong with the shoes since 2 days after being shoes it started to get wrong with behavior. Really wrong.

    Well here it was very icy about 2-3 weeks ago and owner wants to do trails, did not want to have her new horse slidding which I understand.
    Already told her to check with her farrier.
    Élène

    Fighting ovarian cancer ! 2013 huge turnaround as I am winning the battle !..
    http://esergerie.wordpress.com



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
    Location
    Joliette, QC, Canada
    Posts
    4,286

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stovall View Post
    Leena in gray

    I have a friend who bought a young horse who was barefoot all his life, very good feet.
    She decide to put shoes and from that moment, the young horse has started to pull on the reins, even acting naughty. In canter he jumps around and seem he wants to take those shoes away.


    Since you've made no mention of pathology, might one assume the horse will grade a "0" on the AAEP scale after being shod? If so, when a horse manifests a radical change in behavior after being shod, it's most often because the shoes have palliated the symptoms of some form of chronic, low-grade, pathology.

    Is this normal adaptation ? I have never heard of such a problem.

    Behavioral changes after the application of shoes are most often mitigated by wet saddle pads, not by pulling the shoes.

    Maybe there is horse that does not want shoes ?

    Anthropomorphic twaddle.

    Does not need them at all.

    In this case, she decide to shoe because there is quite a bit of rocks in her aera
    .

    In this case, assuming no changes in environment or use, shoes or barefoot probably depends on the integrity of the owner.
    Tom,

    That horse is totally clean, she has x-rays, vet check fine. No pathology.

    I don't think owner is an unware one..She is a good friend of mine and I know she does everything for her horse health care.

    Her farrier told her it might take up to a month for the horse to adapt.

    The horse is young, so was barefoot for that matter, now I don't want to get into any polemics..I was so suprised by the change of behavior. I am just asking.
    Élène

    Fighting ovarian cancer ! 2013 huge turnaround as I am winning the battle !..
    http://esergerie.wordpress.com



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 14, 2009
    Posts
    618

    Default

    I read it completely the opposite.
    He feels so much better now[comfortable], he is currently acting normal.
    There is nothing calmer than a horse to sore to move.

    What does he do on his own time=pasture/turnout/in stall.

    Her farrier told her it might take up to a month for the horse to adapt.
    Not true-I'd look for another Farrier.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,498

    Default

    So the horse has been quiet due to being sore his whole life?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2003
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    3,503

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    So the horse has been quiet due to being sore his whole life?
    I would totally ditto this comment/question!
    --Gwen <><
    "Treat others as you want to be treated and be the change you want to see in the world."
    http://www.thepenzancehorse.com



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2007
    Location
    Comanche, TX
    Posts
    1,242

    Default

    JB in gray

    So the horse has been quiet due to being sore his whole life?

    Sub-clinical lameness can be impossible to detect and an individual's way of going considered "normal" by the horse's connections. No disrespect intended toward anybody involved with this thread, but this happens fairly often around vet clinics: "Well trained" horse goes slightly off, owner/trainer hauls to clinic, vet recommends mechanical treatment, clinic farrier follows prescription - and the horse's behavior changes immediately for the worse as described by the OP. (This is especially common with tiny-footed QHs after a farrier nails on bar shoes to palliate palmar hoof pain.)

    The standard joke among farriers with much veterinary custom is getting fired for making a horse sound enough to come unspooled without hurting - it's happened to all of us.

    On a personal note, I was once threatened with a lawsuit because I'd nailed bar shoes on a WP horse diagnosed with PHP. After the symptoms were palliated, the horse felt a helluva lot better (2 to 0) because he bucked a kid off and broke her arm.
    Last edited by Tom Stovall; Apr. 5, 2011 at 01:00 PM. Reason: Added something
    Tom Stovall, CJF
    No me preguntes cualquier preguntas, yo te diré no mentiras.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
    Location
    Joliette, QC, Canada
    Posts
    4,286

    Default

    Well, thanks for comments !

    Back from the barn and the young chick is fine, normal behaviour, happy. Maybe it was the total thing, as new barn, new owner, new indoor plus shoes, in fact winter one.
    Élène

    Fighting ovarian cancer ! 2013 huge turnaround as I am winning the battle !..
    http://esergerie.wordpress.com



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2006
    Location
    Albany NY
    Posts
    5,490

    Default

    That was my thought. The horse finally feels good enough to act up. Acting up is normal and I would question why a young horse was quiet.

    If it were my horse, I would assume that the horse had been sore prior to the shoes. Acting up is a response to training, not to wearing shoes, so if he didn't before and does now, he must feel he is able to now where as he wasn't going to storm around on his feet before.

    There's no reason to think a horse shouldn't feel better walking on rocks with shoes than without them. What would be the harm in keeping your horse's feet protected?

    Good luck. I hope the OP doesn't put her horse back on bare feet. He clearly is enjoying himself with shoes.
    Airborne? Oh. Yes, he can take a joke. Once. After that, the joke's on you.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,498

    Default

    Not all young horses are fruitbats My now-13yo WB was a really quiet youngster. Sure, he had some moments, but overall, slow and whoa where his favorite things.

    Many horses do absolutely act up in response to physical discomfort. It's not merely a training issue.

    If you read the last response by the OP, apparently the horse is back to her normal, presumably quiet natured behavior.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,909

    Default

    If they're feeling better from shoes, they get a heck of a lot more active and silly. Mine certainly did. He went from just hanging out to a horse who really needs a job to get out that excess energy! Now we're hoping his issues are resolved and he can have one



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Tom-the ole a Lame Horse is a Tame Horse issue?




  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2003
    Location
    Joliette, QC, Canada
    Posts
    4,286

    Default

    Interesting that some of the posters brought up some potential injury..Because the young horse was shoed with winter shoes, so with spikes and that day he injured himself in the turn out, probably he was not aware of the spikes..Not a big injury, but certainly he was not aware of the spikes.

    I really think now he got upset with this discovery and this is why he just act not normal.

    Today he was as happy as a normal horse is, full of good energy and ready to work.
    Thanks very much for the discussion !
    Élène

    Fighting ovarian cancer ! 2013 huge turnaround as I am winning the battle !..
    http://esergerie.wordpress.com



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2004
    Posts
    681

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ltc4h View Post
    He feels so much better now[comfortable], he is currently acting normal.
    There is nothing calmer than a horse to sore to move.


    Not true-I'd look for another Farrier.
    Yes! Fire the Farrier of the sound horse!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2007
    Location
    Comanche, TX
    Posts
    1,242

    Default

    LMH in gray

    Tom-the ole a Lame Horse is a Tame Horse issue?

    Yes'm,

    Counselor, it happens fairly often because some folks couldn't recognize a lame horse if it bit 'em on the butt and talked in Swahili, but such is life.
    Tom Stovall, CJF
    No me preguntes cualquier preguntas, yo te diré no mentiras.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    6,200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stovall View Post
    Counselor, it happens fairly often because some folks couldn't recognize a lame horse if it bit 'em on the butt and talked in Swahili, but such is life.
    Oh so THAT's what they sound like!




  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
    Posts
    3,394

    Default

    Biting on the but and talking Swahili, are listed under Clinical Lameness Symptoms in chapter 37 of "Stovall's Lameness in Horses, 7th Edition."



Similar Threads

  1. Need adaptation ideas...
    By Jay-N-Jete' in forum Equestrians with Disabilities
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Mar. 8, 2010, 04:53 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •