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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2002
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    705

    Default Sooo, I went to look at a horse yesterday...What the heck is this????

    I drove out yesterday to look at a 4 year old WB/TB gelding by a deceased Trakehner stallion that I always loved. The horse is super cheap, but unstarted, thought he might might a nice prospect to get going under saddle. Soooo, the farm is very old and rundown, and when she pulled him out of a pit of a mud sucking pasture, I noticed that he walked funny behind. On the concrete floor of the barn, and outside on the driveway, he was picking up both hind feet high, and then placing them down, rather than bringing them through and under. First couple of strides thought it might just be the differences from being in deep mud to walking on dry, flat ground, but it continued, although it seemed to get a little better. No place to really evaluate the horse, wouldn't trot in hand, didn't know how. All I can say is he was kind of hiking his hind legs up higher than normal, then placing them down. Didn't look exactly like stringhalt, as he wasn't snapping them up and awkwardly throwing them down, and it was both hind legs. I'm thinking it was his stifles?? Maybe he's strained them from running around in deep mud 24/7, or could it be OCD or WHAT? I've bred and owned a lot of horses, and boarded scores more, never saw exactly this kind of motion. I wonder if getting him out of the deep mud for a while and letting him rest, and putting him on good nutrition would work? It did seem to get better as he walked more on the dry ground.

    I will say that I feel so sad for this horse, he is absolutely gorgeous, put together VERY VERY nicely, sweet, kind, and would clean up to be a high dollar horse. He is living on yucky round bales, tail is in a total dreadlock, looks like a wooly yak, and he just deserves so much better. The good samaritan side of me wants to go get him, she'll let me try him and bring him back if he isn't right, the older, more practical side of me says not to borrow trouble, and just let him where he is. I don't need problems, but still....Has anyone had experience with such movement in a large, young warmblood? just need some input so I can walk away or is he worth the gas money to try him out for a week...Thx



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Posts
    808

    Default

    I had seen similar sounding movement in two horses. Both had it since young age. Both were fixed with a couple of chiro/body work sessions and corrective physical rehab work. One needed periodic adjustments, the other seemed fine after the initial treatment protocol.

    If you care to pm me more details and video clip I may be able to give you a better estimate? Wish I was closer, I really have a soft spot for younger horses that need a good start to life.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

    Default

    Sounds like stringhalt.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    Northeast PA
    Posts
    1,517

    Default

    Yep, sounds like stringhalt to me.

    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/in...m/bc/90777.htm



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Location
    Silvana, WA
    Posts
    1,185

    Default

    I wouldn't be so quick to assume stringhalt. The gelding I acquired last fall walked that way when he first came in to my trainers barn to get cleaned up. Turned out he had contracted heels, thrush and no muscle tone due to bad nutrition.

    After farrier cleaned up his feet and we killed the thrish it was 75% better. By the second shoeing it was gone. It might be worth giving him a chance if you like him otherwise. I'm certainly glad that I gave Digger one.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Lucama, NC
    Posts
    5,868

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by UrbanHennery View Post
    I wouldn't be so quick to assume stringhalt. The gelding I acquired last fall walked that way when he first came in to my trainers barn to get cleaned up. Turned out he had contracted heels, thrush and no muscle tone due to bad nutrition.

    After farrier cleaned up his feet and we killed the thrish it was 75% better. By the second shoeing it was gone. It might be worth giving him a chance if you like him otherwise. I'm certainly glad that I gave Digger one.
    First noone said it WAS sptringhalt, but that these are stringhalt like symptoms. Second, read the posted article, it states that some conditions the the foot and pastern can cause stringhalt like symptoms. If I were considering the horse I maybe would take it to a better environment for a couple of weeks and see if any imporvement, along with having a vet check the horse thoroughly. I had a horse with stringhalt and we successfully did the surgery mentioned in the article and I showed him for several years.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2010
    Posts
    439

    Default

    Screams stringhalt, but im sure being stuck out in the mud, and not being in any work could attribute to weak stifles, bad feet and sore hocks. I would be very cautious with this one.
    Don't squat with yer spurs on

    "The world is best viewed through the ears of a horse."



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2009
    Posts
    1,359

    Default

    He just sounds overall sore, unhappy. Deep mud, doing nothing, not eating right etc. all contributors. If it was me, and since the owner said you can bring home and bring back if needed, I would bring him to your place to get a good evaluation of him. He could be a diamond in the ruff that is ... just ruff! Just don't fall in love with him while he is on visitation.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 23, 2001
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,963

    Default

    Rescue him, please



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
    Location
    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
    Posts
    9,149

    Default

    We had a horse with weird stringhalt, and he got really really weird if he had an abcess or something bothering his footsies. It did NOT look like stringhalt I'd ever seen, but the vet said it was a fairly typical "style". I guess I've just not seen enough examples.

    So, my point is, he could have some serious mud induced hoof issues compounding the problem.
    People are crazy and times are strange.
    I used to care but, things have changed.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2006
    Location
    WNY
    Posts
    5,864

    Default

    N, you're going to cave and give the poor horse a home. Why delay? Hook up your trailer and go.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    10,938

    Default

    Honestly, it could be any number of things. You'd need to get him to a better environment before you could evaluate them.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2009
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    944

    Default

    I had an old land lord that kept his race horses in MUD paddocks all winter or when they were not on the track. Damn near every one when finally pulled of the mud pits walked like you describe. The horses were SORE all over and often had absesses and often thrush. Once they got to the trainer and were cleaned up, HOSED off, ROACHED and put into proper stalls they took about a month to really get better, but they almost always did. With a horse like you are describing if he really is CHEAP I would snatch him up, take him home, give him some bute, give him an extreme make over and then just let him be about two months or so. He's probably extremely sore, his feet probably hurt and he needs a good home. Could be a real diamond in the rough.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 20, 2006
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    Pa-eternally laboring in the infinite creative and sustentative work of the universe
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    1,193

    Default

    Im sure with some good stabling, good care he will come around nicely. A thorough vetting will show you what you are exactly dealing with, -- although it sounds like stringhalt, it might only be some loose stifles that a bit of walking and hill work will resolve.

    Ive seen many horses come from those conditions that you'd never recognize a month later
    IN GOD WE TRUST
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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2002
    Location
    West Coast of Michigan
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    36,321

    Default

    Cat's ear or false dandelion in the pasture (wrong time of year, though) or the hay can cause a type of stringhalt.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catsear
    Click here before you buy.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2002
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    705

    Default

    Thanks, everyone. My good sense tells me to just walk away, he's not my problem and I'd be better off not getting into it. His feet need trimmed badly, hard to tell exactly what they are like, and he hasn't been wormed since fall - could be more problems...My gut is telling me he's sore and weak, his muscling isn't what it should be, how could it be from just eating yucky round bales? I would hate to bring him here and end up with a huge problem, plus he's never been broke, has been handled, and trailered once to be gelded. Soooo, he's never been off the farm, 4 year old, 16.1-16.2H, unbroke, could be a handful. However, he's got sweet kind baby eyes, the prettiest face, great conformation, and I can picture him all fattened up, cleaned up, and he would be incredibly stunning...

    She says she'll take him to auction if he doesn't sell...It all comes down to do I want to go get him, feed him for a couple of weeks, and assess, then take him back if it isn't good? I know I should run...run...run....

    Why do I even go look?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
    Posts
    10,938

    Default

    What are you going to lose if you bring him home? What price range is she asking for?

    I'd get him, put him on some decent hay and a dry field and give him some time. Unbroke at his age doesn't bother me one bit.
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    389

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by artisticgold View Post
    Thanks, everyone. My good sense tells me to just walk away, he's not my problem and I'd be better off not getting into it. His feet need trimmed badly, hard to tell exactly what they are like, and he hasn't been wormed since fall - could be more problems...My gut is telling me he's sore and weak, his muscling isn't what it should be, how could it be from just eating yucky round bales? I would hate to bring him here and end up with a huge problem, plus he's never been broke, has been handled, and trailered once to be gelded. Soooo, he's never been off the farm, 4 year old, 16.1-16.2H, unbroke, could be a handful. However, he's got sweet kind baby eyes, the prettiest face, great conformation, and I can picture him all fattened up, cleaned up, and he would be incredibly stunning...

    She says she'll take him to auction if he doesn't sell...It all comes down to do I want to go get him, feed him for a couple of weeks, and assess, then take him back if it isn't good? I know I should run...run...run....

    Why do I even go look?

    But with all that said, is something still screaming at you? If so, and you can afford it, pick him up.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2009
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    944

    Default

    Honestly I'd rather have UNHANDLED four that hasn't been f-ed up by an over bearing training or a total novice or kool-aid drinker than one that has. In my book unhandled is actually a good thing, it means I can start the horse right from day one and not spend all my time undoing someone elses crap training.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    12,229

    Wink

    Post pictures of him after you get his feet done, of course he'll need to cleaned up first.

    Make sure you get a written agreement from the owner before brining him home.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



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