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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default Hip Replacement

    Hi there, I will be getting a hip replacement and was wondering if anyone who has had one, knows what type of device they had implanted and if they have had any issues with dislocation. I have seen 4 different docs and 2 recommended using a larger metal head, two said no. Any comments would so be appreciated! Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2001
    Location
    Cullowhere?, NC
    Posts
    8,583

    Default

    Can't comment on what's in my hip; there are so many possibilities. I do know mine is the permeable kind that the bone grows into, but that's the shaft that goes down into the femur. Don't know how the size of the head compares. But my surgeon did say that riding is one of the activities that is favorable (after suitable recovery and healing, of course) in the sense that it is minimally weight-bearing, and the angle of the hip is such that the risk of dislocation is minimized. This does assume, of course, that you do everything you can to minimize the risk of falling off. If anything happens to the bone around the shaft, you're toast.

    I believe the head of mine is metal (I want to say titanium), but the socket is lined with a material similar to what tupperware is made of. Don't know anything about the relative size, tho; sorry. I have had no problems with dislocation.

    Good luck; you'll be glad you had it done, and there are several of us on here who have been there with positive results!
    "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

    Spay and neuter. Please.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 7, 2001
    Location
    va
    Posts
    1,000

    Default

    I hope you have found an orthopod that does the replacement using the anterior approach. Right hip was done the old way (going in from the back with big muscles being cut thus having to heal), and left hip was done with the incision from the front (no big muscles being cut but instead just moved over). The difference in post-op pain and healing time is DRAMATIC-----more than night and day, like being on a different planet!!!!!!! The first time, I was in the hospital for 3 days, couldn't drive for 6 weeks, and was on serious pain meds that only sort of worked for several weeks. The second time, I was home the next day and off pain meds in 2 days.

    I can't recall which device was used either time, but I do remember the first doc changed plans during the surgery based on my age and activity level and went with the stronger choice.

    I'm not saying that the first doc wasn't good. He came very well recommended. I was going back to him again, but then I heard about the other guy. I can't say enough good things about Dr. Anthony Carter at Hampton Roads Orthopedic and Sports Medicine in Newport News, VA. He is one of the pioneers with this newer technique, and he goes all over the country teaching other docs how to due the surgery this way. He literally has folks coming here from all over the country and from other countries to have him do their replacements.

    You must do the PT for a few weeks after your surgery, or you won't get the most benefit. Either way the surgery is done, you should not have big problems riding post-op. Of course the stronger you are before it's done, the easier time you'll have going back to your previous activities.

    For the second hip, I put the surgery off WAY longer than I should have because of the previous recovery experience. When I found out how much easier the newer way is, I really kicked myself for having kept myself in so much pain for so long with such a loss of the activities that make life functional and enjoyable.

    Good luck whichever way you decide to go!!

    PS If you still have an older, lower toilet, do yourself a huge favor and get a newer model that is taller. Not having as far to go before you're actually sitting down is lovely.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2009
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by monstrpony View Post
    Can't comment on what's in my hip; there are so many possibilities. I do know mine is the permeable kind that the bone grows into, but that's the shaft that goes down into the femur. Don't know how the size of the head compares. But my surgeon did say that riding is one of the activities that is favorable (after suitable recovery and healing, of course) in the sense that it is minimally weight-bearing, and the angle of the hip is such that the risk of dislocation is minimized. This does assume, of course, that you do everything you can to minimize the risk of falling off. If anything happens to the bone around the shaft, you're toast.

    I believe the head of mine is metal (I want to say titanium), but the socket is lined with a material similar to what tupperware is made of. Don't know anything about the relative size, tho; sorry. I have had no problems with dislocation.

    Good luck; you'll be glad you had it done, and there are several of us on here who have been there with positive results!
    Same here, it's been six months and I'm back to normal.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2009
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by incentive View Post
    I hope you have found an orthopod that does the replacement using the anterior approach. Right hip was done the old way (going in from the back with big muscles being cut thus having to heal), and left hip was done with the incision from the front (no big muscles being cut but instead just moved over). The difference in post-op pain and healing time is DRAMATIC-----more than night and day, like being on a different planet!!!!!!! The first time, I was in the hospital for 3 days, couldn't drive for 6 weeks, and was on serious pain meds that only sort of worked for several weeks. The second time, I was home the next day and off pain meds in 2 days.



    I'm not saying that the first doc wasn't good. He came very well recommended. I was going back to him again, but then I heard about the other guy. I can't say enough good things about Dr. Anthony Carter at Hampton Roads Orthopedic and Sports Medicine in Newport News, VA. He is one of the pioneers with this newer technique, and he goes all over the country teaching other docs how to due the surgery this way. He literally has folks coming here from all over the country and from other countries to have him do their replacements.

    You must do the PT for a few weeks after your surgery, or you won't get the most benefit. Either way the surgery is done, you should not have big problems riding post-op. Of course the stronger you are before it's done, the easier time you'll have going back to your previous activities.

    For the second hip, I put the surgery off WAY longer than I should have because of the previous recovery experience. When I found out how much easier the newer way is, I really kicked myself for having kept myself in so much pain for so long with such a loss of the activities that make life functional and enjoyable.

    Good luck whichever way you decide to go!!

    PS If you still have an older, lower toilet, do yourself a huge favor and get a newer model that is taller. Not having as far to go before you're actually sitting down is lovely.
    I'm sure the anterior approach is better, but finding a surgeon can be difficult.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2009
    Posts
    5,360

    Default

    The implants that last the longest are the biological ones. They're porous and allow the bone to grow into the implant itself. Not everyone is a candidate, though - the other option is the cemented kind.

    Right now a lot of research seems to favor the all-metal ball & socket types, as they last longer. There's some disagreement, mainly about what sort of long-term effects might result from the release of metal ions within the body.

    I've had mine 10 years - got it when I was 32 as a result of a fracture/avascular necrosis. Just a month ago I had to get a new socket liner, and there's a great chance the hip may last me the rest of my life - the newer plastics are SO much better than they used to be. And I am REALLY hard on mine - very active.

    A larger head ball=more stability. I also got one of these along with my new acetabular liner.

    I strongly urge anyone facing hip replacement to investigate having it done under an epidural as opposed to getting totally knocked out with a general. I asked for one with my replacement, and wow, it made a huge difference in the recovery time and pain management. Having an epidural does not mean you'll be awake - they do sedate you and you will probably have no idea what's going on. This last time I had one, again by request. I was somewhat alert for most of the 2-hour procedure, but I'd asked the anesthesiologist to sedate me as lightly as he was comfortable doing. It was great - none of the post-op grogginess and nausea and misery. Plus they will allow you to eat and drink normally if you've had an epidural!

    There's also a newer "keyhole" approach with a very minimal incision.

    Definitely get the raised toilet seat! It makes life much easier, though my dogs were annoyed because the higher seat meant they could no longer reach the bowl for a drink!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2005
    Posts
    1,635

    Default

    I had the anterior minimally invasive approach 14 months ago.

    Depuy "Corail" stem component, uncemented, size 8

    Depuy "Pinnacle" socket, with metal cup, and polyetheline liner

    Biolock ceramic 32mm metal femoral head ball

    I was riding within 4 months. I believe the 32mm ball was the larger size and they reccommended because of riding.
    ********
    There is no snooze button on a cat that wants breakfast.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2003
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    1,561

    Default

    I had hip resurfacing not total replacement 5 years ago. Side incision. No rod down my femur!--conserved bone in case that is ever needed later. I was part of the trial so doc was conservative and I rode 4 months after with no issues or pain. Could have sooner. Highly recommend it. C+ parts. Best joint in my body now. (Not the recalled one.) Size of ball should be right for you, not big v. small.
    http://www.surfacehippy.info/wrightcplus.php
    http://TouchstoneAcres.com
    Touchstone Acres Lipizzans, Standing N. Samira VI (Gray), N. XXIX-18(Black), more in 2014



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2011
    Posts
    139

    Default

    I had a partial hip replacement 3+ years ago when I got thrown at a horse show and the head of the femur snapped. I had emergency surgery at a strange hospital, but lucked out with a surgeon who did everything right. I too had a side incision, very minimal pain, riding again in 3 months, back to normal in 6. Good luck with yours!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default Hip Replacement

    Thanks to all for your comments, I have scheduled surgery for June 28th! Found a doc who is well versed in the anterior approach and I requested a spinal block with mild anesthesia. He will be implanting a ceramic ball on a highly crosslinked polyethylene liner. He hasnt done a THR for an equestrian, but I explained to him that range of motion laterally as well as front to back (posting) is most important. I think he gets it... Mara, thanks for your comment regarding toilets, I have arranged for a "high throne" seat! How is everyone doing with their riding? Any issues?



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,380

    Default RIDING WILL BE FUN AGAIN = NO PAIN !!!

    GOOD LUCK DON'T RUSH YOUR RECOVERY ~

    RIDING WILL BE FUN AGAIN = NO PAIN !

    THR LEFT SIDE 1-17-05
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2005
    Posts
    1,635

    Default

    You'll be fine. Riding is great with no pain. My only issue is in my head, I have stopped riding greenies and arabs, I don't want to get thrown again.
    ********
    There is no snooze button on a cat that wants breakfast.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,380

    Default I've Even Been "dumped" and my hip was ok ! YIKES !

    I've even been "dumped" again and my THR was fine !

    My rotator cuff was not so good after my flying dismount but ~~~
    fixed now and
    LIFE GOES ON AND I CONTINUE TO RIDE `
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Thanks you guys! I asked my doc what would be his biggest worry, worst case scenario. He said a kick or fall where I landed on a branch or an edge of something extremely hard. He also said I couldnt dislocate it while mounting or something like that. It would have to be a hard hit. Anyway! So glad to hear your comments. I am soooo looking forward to getting this done. (and losing a few pounds Ive put on by being sedentary.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2005
    Posts
    1,635

    Default

    I could feed and carry water buckets 6 weeks out.
    ********
    There is no snooze button on a cat that wants breakfast.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default burning pain after thp

    hi all, surgery was a success! I am walking with a walker and scheduled for my first therapy next week. Has anyone experienced sharp stabbing and burning pain over the thigh area? That is more painful than the joint area. Any suggestions on how to eleviate it?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
    Location
    Spotsylvania, VA
    Posts
    12,770

    Default

    Call your surgeon and ask but I would ice the thigh
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2001
    Location
    Cullowhere?, NC
    Posts
    8,583

    Default

    Yes, do check with your surgeon on the burning pain, want to make sure it isn't infection or something like that. Glad the surgery is behind you! Things well start to get better fast now, tho you will hit some plateaux in the process.
    "One person's cowboy is another person's blooming idiot" -- katarine

    Spay and neuter. Please.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2005
    Posts
    1,635

    Default

    http://bonesmart.org/public_forum/hi...-area-f30.html


    This site I posted is a wonderful resource, but check with your doctor to be sure there is no infection. I never had pain like that.
    ********
    There is no snooze button on a cat that wants breakfast.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2011
    Posts
    10

    Default

    it wasnt infection. i knew that, it was and still slightly is, the nerves regenerating. very wierd. my PT is going well! I am on the leg press and stairmaster equivalents. walking much better but still with a walker. i can move my leg in all directions except up when laying on my back.



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