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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    149

    Default Advice/Questions about leasing

    Hi there! I need some advice about leasing out my horse. I've asked on here before, but it was a bit of a different situation back then. He is a 7yo Morgan gelding, currently boarded at a local eventing stable. I'm a military wife, and my first PCS move is coming up soon. Unfortunately we probably won't be at our first station for long enough for it to be worth bringing my horse (it's just for DH's training). I've decided to offer him for a free lease. I only want my horse to either be kept where I board him now or where he used to be boarded. Ideally I would prefer where he is now, so that he doesn't have to move and can remain in training with the trainer there. I would allow showing/competition on him (he is just about ready to start o/f, but is coming along very nicely on the flat, has been getting training about 2x a week and I will continue this up until I move). Is it unreasonable to stipulate where he be kept and who trains him? Can I stipulate that the lessee MUST take lessons with my trainer? Also, who would pay for his insurance and microchipping, which I plan to get before I move? I'm planning to put an ad in the Equiery, but where are some other places to put ads, if my trainer doesn't have any clients who are interested? TIA everyone!
    ~*~
    Sarah



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2004
    Location
    Catonsville, MD
    Posts
    6,882

    Default

    It is completely reasonable to stipulate where he is kept and that the lessee take 1 lesson a week w/ your trainer. This is not uncommon. If you are someplace here in MD w/ reasonable riding facilities, it's frankly a convenience to the lessee for the horse to be all settled where you are going to keep him before the lessee starts riding him.

    I would find a good sample lease contract (they exist on this BB, just search), and I would modify to cover everything you want it to. You can specify how often he is jumped, and that it should only be w/ trainer. You can specify his vet and farrier.

    I would require the lessee to insure him and make you the beneficiary for the mortality insurance and they can be the beneficiary for medical costs (I think this can be done). If you can put him on a health plan, where shots and worming are on a pre-determined schedule, that's a good way to reduce complexity too.

    Make sure you specify which of you pays for injury care, and under what circumstances the lease can be terminated. Good luck, it can work out well for all if you are thorough and find a good lessee.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09




  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    149

    Default

    Thanks for the tips!


    "I would require the lessee to insure him and make you the beneficiary for the mortality insurance and they can be the beneficiary for medical costs (I think this can be done). If you can put him on a health plan, where shots and worming are on a pre-determined schedule, that's a good way to reduce complexity too. "

    Is it better to do this, or to purchase the policy and then have the lessee pay me for it? Last time I spoke briefly with my BO about leasing, he said that they do not get involved in the arrangement and would prefer the lessee pay me and then I pay them (a bit of a pain, but I understand it), so I could feasibly add the monthly insurance payment into what they pay me... I think.
    ~*~
    Sarah



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    149

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmine View Post
    Are you working with a trainer now? You might be best off if your trainer has a student who'd like to lease him. That way the lessons stipulation has your horse working with a trainer you trust, and won't be a big deal for the person leasing him. Otherwise, maybe talk to a few trainers you trust and see if they have a horseless student who would work.
    I am working with a trainer now, but I don't believe she has many students who don't own horses. She DOES have one student who has been riding my horse in lessons 1x a week, so I'm hoping maybe the girl would like to lease maybe for the summer. At least then I could have some time to find a more "permanent" lease. But, the last time we talked about her (the student) my trainer said she has some other sports obligations and may be quitting lessons entirely I definitely plan to ask her though and see if she knows of anyone else.
    ~*~
    Sarah



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,436

    Default

    You can ask for anything you want in your lease - it's your horse, after all! And most people will tell you, the more you cover in the lease, the better it is for everyone involved. That is the best way you can ensure that there are no surprises in the event something unforeseen happens (so you should cover things like, where the horse can be kept, what sort of work the horse can do, whether you will allow showing and if so, who pays for what, etc.) It is not unusual to require a horse to be kept in a certain trainer's care or to require a minimum number of lessons - but be aware that with every rule or requirement you add, you may make the horse less attractive to potential lessees. That is why your trainer is the best source of potential lessees if you want to keep the horse in your current barn, especially if the horse is not an experienced animal with a long show record to offer. In my area, a horse that is just being started over fences and must be kept in training would probably not generate a ton of interest from potential lessees who want a show horse, but your area might be different.

    I personally would always want to make sure the horse is insured - and outline who is responsible for paying what in the event the horse is injured - including any deductibles that may apply.

    Many, many leases require insurance to be paid for by the person leasing the horse, but also allow that person to terminate the lease for any reason on thirty days' notice - so in the event that the horse is seriously injured, you might have coverage for the vet bills, but have no one around to do stuff like hand walk, change dressings or wraps, etc if your lessee elects to exercise their right to walk away a month later. Just something to think about.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  6. #6
    BucketBoss Guest

    Default

    I don't have much by way of advice, but I did spend a good deal of time a few years ago looking for a lease situation (I found one but its not very traditional haha)

    Anyway, when I was looking for a lease, I was looking for one where the horse was to be kept where it was because I thought it would be more convenient to go somewhere where the horse was settled and the people around knew the horse. It just seemed easier to me for everything to be already organized, set up and comfortable. It might not be everyone's opinion, but I definitely think there are some people who don't mind you wanting your horse to stay put.

    I wouldn't have minded taking lessons with the horse's trainer at all in the beginning, but I don't know, personally, that I would want agree to a lease if a stipulation was that I had to continuously take lessons with said person without knowing that person and their teaching style.


    Either way, as someone looking for a lease, I think it all sounds pretty reasonable. I agree with what was said above, the more details you put into the lease agreement, the better!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
    Location
    Rixeyville, VA
    Posts
    6,456

    Default

    Microchipping would be the owner's expenses and outside the lease agreement. That is a "permanent' ID that the owner wants, not that the lessee wants. I don't know Morgans and perhaps microchipping is required for Morgan shows, but most likely the lessee will want to do low level open schooling shows that don't require confirmed horse identification to show.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    149

    Default

    Microchipping would be the owner's expenses and outside the lease agreement. That is a "permanent' ID that the owner wants, not that the lessee wants. I don't know Morgans and perhaps microchipping is required for Morgan shows, but most likely the lessee will want to do low level open schooling shows that don't require confirmed horse identification to show.
    The microchipping would definitely just be for me. So I would pay for it. Not sure why I asked about it.... lol. While I don't plan on moving him now, someday he will be part of our mobile military family, so I'd like the microchip for piece of mind. As far as I know they aren't required at Morgan shows.

    One more question: Is it a good idea to have my potential lessee have a riding evaluation by my trainer? I am going to require at least monthly lessons with her (per her advice). I can tell if someone is a green-as-grass rider, but beyond that I'm not to sure. Someone probably could look really good for a half hour or so while my rather untrained eye watches them. If so, who pays for that (I would not ask my trainer to do it for free) - me or them?
    ~*~
    Sarah



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