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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,208

    Default dealing with having to lease :*(

    i lost my income back in november, very unexpectedly. luckily i was entitled to severance, though i am STILL fighting with unemployment over what should be very straightforward.

    long story short, we can't pay our bills for much longer, so we have to move in with family in another state that doesn't have land. we have 3 horses. i can't afford to board 3. the youngster can stay here until our farmette sells, for next to nothing, and being cared for by the friends leasing our house. i can take one with me, but that leaves one that really doesn't need to sit in a field for an undetermined amount of time. the only solution is to lease him out.

    i think i've found an ideal fit for him, friend of a friend. they are trying him tomorrow. he will be insured, contract, checked on, etc. but the thought still makes me want to cry. i wouldn't be less upset about leasing the other, and she would be much harder to find someone for.

    how do you handle handing over the reins of a horse you adore, when there really is no other option?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Posts
    3,427

    Default

    No advice. Just hugs.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2005
    Location
    Australasia
    Posts
    1,134

    Default

    No advice from me either. More hugs.

    On the up side, it is a lease and you're not having to sell the horse you adore. Hugs again.
    where am I, what day is it, am I still having a good time?



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2002
    Location
    Dungeon of the Ivory Tower
    Posts
    20,394

    Default

    I am so sorry. Hopefully this will be a very workable solution for all.
    www.specialhorses.org
    a 501(c)3 organization helping 501(c)3 equine rescues




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2001
    Location
    nj
    Posts
    8,792

    Default (((hugs)))

    sorry you're going through this. hopefully it'll turn out to be a very temporary situation. maybe the new location will provide some great job opportunity and you can end the lease.

    for what it's worth, while i totally understand your concerns, i leased my mare before i bought her and i treated her no different than i would my own horse. she got the best of everything. so just because someone is only a lessee doesn't necessarily mean that they won't love and care for your horse. try to keep that in mind.
    http://www.eponashoe.com/
    TQ(Trail Queen) \"Learn How to Ride or Move Over!!\" Clique



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,208

    Default

    thanks for the hugs. I've known this was coming for a while, but it's just really starting to hit me.

    Quote Originally Posted by marta View Post
    for what it's worth, while i totally understand your concerns, i leased my mare before i bought her and i treated her no different than i would my own horse. she got the best of everything. so just because someone is only a lessee doesn't necessarily mean that they won't love and care for your horse. try to keep that in mind.
    from what the woman has said, this sounds like that kind of situation. he would be mostly for a young teen who is supposedly a very good rider, and he would be at the woman's house. from the sounds of it, they will baby him.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2008
    Location
    now in KCMO, and plan to stay there
    Posts
    3,040

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Horse with No Name View Post
    No advice from me either. More hugs.

    On the up side, it is a lease and you're not having to sell the horse you adore. Hugs again.
    Ditto this. Just in case it would help you find a way not to have to move (I have no idea what your career field is, but cannot hurt to look...), go to www.usajobs.com and look at jobs available in the federal government. Good luck and keep us posted! (more hugs)
    Jeanie
    RIP Sasha, best dog ever, pictured shortly before she died, Death either by euthanasia or natural causes is only the end of the animal inhabiting its body; I believe the spirit lives on.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,268

    Default

    Oh man, I feel you.

    Here's what you do:

    1. You realize that your horse has his own little guardian angel helping you and him out. The guardian angel got you to take care of him and brought you a lesee. Have faith that this horse's good juju will continue!

    2. Treat your lessee well and stay in touch. Let him/her know how much you care about this horse and them. People like to do the right thing and help people and horses out. Be someone they like to have as part of a team that does a very nice job for this horse.

    3. Take a minute to see the things you are doing right-- keeping afloat and making sure your animals are ok.

    4. As others have said, think of this as temporary. You are doing the right thing, and maintaining a relationship with the lessee during this one chapter of your horse's life. There's another one after this!
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2010
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    1,523

    Default

    I've never been a lessor, but I have been a leasee. I have several horses, but this one had some good training on him, and I took him as a learning opportunity. I ended up in love. His owner decided to let me keep the old ding dong, and we couldn't be happier. During the lease period, I never denied that horse anything. I've been very careful with him because of his age. I just want you know that there are a lot of us out there who are very grateful for the chance to lease a nice horse, and we're willing to do whatever it takes to insure the critter's wellbeing. I hope things work out well and soon for you.
    "Rock n' roll's not through, yeah, I'm sewing wings on this thing." --Destroyer
    http://dressagescriblog.wordpress.com/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2010
    Location
    United States of Absurdistan
    Posts
    1,736

    Default

    Hugs. And jingles that. You find a job soon

    LBR
    I reject your reality, and substitute my own- Adam Savage

    R.I.P Ron Smith, you'll be greatly missed



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2000
    Location
    Full time in Delhi, NY!
    Posts
    6,397

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hampton Bay View Post
    from what the woman has said, this sounds like that kind of situation. he would be mostly for a young teen who is supposedly a very good rider, and he would be at the woman's house. from the sounds of it, they will baby him.
    Why supposedly? You need to KNOW that this kid can ride your horse. If you did not *need* to lease this horse, if you just wanted to, wouldn't that be the FIRST thing you'd find out? Not just whether they can afford the board, or pay the vet. You don't want the horse ruined while you're out of state. As recent threads here have proved, you can never have too many conversations with the lessees during the course of the lease. Also I would suggest asking them to send photos monthly so you can see for yourself that what your being told is the truth. I learned this the hard way.

    Now as to how do you deal with this, you stand up and realize that as much as you love them, horses are a luxury that you can't afford at this time. Your husband and family are top of the list. You move on because you must. You will never forget the heartache, and down the road, the memory of this may help you make decisions down the road. The state of the economy is forcing a LOT of people to get used to states of living (sometimes just survival) they never dreamed of. I hope your circumstances improve quickly.
    ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
    Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

    "Life is merrier with a terrier!"



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,208

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kryswyn View Post
    Why supposedly? You need to KNOW that this kid can ride your horse.
    Well, as I said in my first post, they had not yet tried the horse. I just got back from them trying him out. I knew of the trainer through some mutual horsey contacts, but had not seen the kid ride. So the "supposedly" is because while I had heard good things about her, I still hadn't met her!

    She did very well on him, but he turned up a hair back sore. He's been sitting in a field for a month, so no idea where that came from, and he seemed fine last night when I rode him. He's not lame persay, but a bit uneven behind. So we shall see. Trainer's trainer think's it's nothing that some strengthening over the topline won't help.

    I can't help but want them to pass just because I don't WaNT to lease him, but we can't get into a situation where they have to go NOW.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2003
    Location
    St Aug, Fla
    Posts
    3,812

    Default

    Oh no! Im so sorry Emily! That stinks but I agree that a good lease situation is better than having to sell. Is it Mir you are having to lease out? No advice just lots of hugs!!!
    ~~~~~~~~~

    Member of the ILMD[FN]HP Clique, The Florida Clique, OMGiH I loff my mares, and the Bareback Riders clique!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2004
    Location
    Southeast
    Posts
    1,504

    Default

    Sorry to hear about your change in life, I've walked in your shoes. Like you, I went through a period where money was short and leased out one of my horses. Watched the gal ride the horse twice, had a contract, horse was boarded at the same barn as my other horse, and watched her ride at least once a month. For the most part it was a good situation. After almost two years of leasing, she went on to buy her own horse and to another barn. The BO and a few other boarders came up to me after she left and told me she asked too much from my horse and they were afraid to tell me because they knew I needed the money. I started riding him again after the lease and noticed the horse was spooky, which was not normal. After he dumped me, which was out of the blue, decided to have the vet out. He was diagnosed with ulcers, we treated, pulled his shoes and gave him the winter off. Who knows if the leaser's riding style was the cause, but he was not a spooky horse before the lease. My point is, I should have been more aware of what was going on, but my tight checkbook let me look at things in a different way. You mentioned you're moving to another state, go visit and keep in touch. Good luck and I hope you bounce back quickly and everyone is together again.
    "You gave your life to become the person you are right now. Was it worth it?" Richard Bach



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
    Posts
    5,208

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KrazyTBMare View Post
    Oh no! Im so sorry Emily! That stinks but I agree that a good lease situation is better than having to sell. Is it Mir you are having to lease out? No advice just lots of hugs!!!
    Yep, it's Mir. He's a fabulous little horse, and the girl rode him very nicely. She was a very soft rider. Luckily I know several people who know this woman, and my horsey friend lives 10 minutes away. Plus since we have family here, we will be back to visit. I could just toss him in a pasture until my farm sells, but I don't want him to just sit. He needs to be ridden. He really enjoys working. So if the lease ends up not working out after a bit, he will have somewhere to go. Even if the farm sells quickly, I do have several friends who could take him in until I could pick him back up. Of course, leasing him also means I can't just change my mind and take him out from under this little girl, whose last horse died, until the term of the lease is over (unless they aren't doing right by him, of course). With my baby horse who will stay here, I could always just come get her whenever I felt like it.

    I'm just going to miss his kisses and his intoxicating horsey breath



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2004
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    4,058

    Default

    so sorry

    I leased out my mare for 2yrs to a fellow COTHer. It was a very good idea and I don't regret it at all.

    I had to sell her after my lease because I lost my job and unemployment didn't pay me enought to support her and the family Now 3 months later I have my job back and all is well

    I guess I will just look into buying a foal (WB Pinto, Pali or buck) on the ground or in utero
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"



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