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  1. #1
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    Default Need help deciphering judge's comments!

    What does "Or" stand for? One comment said "could be straighter and Or" and another said "needs Or over the topline". Thanks!



  2. #2

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    Rounder, probably?
    The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
    Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.



  3. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hntrjmprpro45 View Post
    What does "Or" stand for? One comment said "could be straighter and Or" and another said "needs Or over the topline". Thanks!
    If I had to guess, I'd say it's not an O but a circle (any dot in the middle?) and is supposed to be "round"-er. It took me a couple of tries to come up with that.

    As an aside, I always encourage people worried about getting behind in scribing to just drop all the vowels when they get rushed. While not perfect, at least you have a limited number of options to try to figure it out, unlike symbols:
    cld b strghtr & rndr would be a little more decipherable.



  4. #4
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    Default

    It should mean "Circle right" according to accepted abbreviations used by scribes.


    http://www.dressage.net.au/scribingsymbols.pdf
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Applecore View Post
    If I had to guess, I'd say it's not an O but a circle (any dot in the middle?) and is supposed to be "round"-er. It took me a couple of tries to come up with that.

    As an aside, I always encourage people worried about getting behind in scribing to just drop all the vowels when they get rushed. While not perfect, at least you have a limited number of options to try to figure it out, unlike symbols:
    cld b strghtr & rndr would be a little more decipherable.
    There was no dot in the middle of the circle but I do think your meaning is what they meant. I was riding a greenie and there were a few times when he would stiffen up in his back (mainly when gawking at the judge's table). Thanks!



  6. #6
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    It should mean "Circle right" according to accepted abbreviations used by scribes.

    http://www.dressage.net.au/scribingsymbols.pdf
    Great resource! Tho been scribing for quite a long time, I would have never guessed "rounder"!

    As I understand scribing, our job is to convey the judge's impressions accurately and I put a lot of effort into documenting judges' wording.

    As Applecore suggests, I tend to drop unimportant vowels rather than use symbols, not only because they seem easier to decipher, but because it's easier for me to stay with "words"
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  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AllWeatherGal View Post
    Great resource! Tho been scribing for quite a long time, I would have never guessed "rounder"!
    Here are links to the official scribing abbreviations accepted in the USA and Canada.

    http://torontocadora.com/images/pdf/...ibingGuide.pdf[

    http://www.usdf.org/docs/ShowFlash/w...forScribes.pdf

    There is no "OR." Would be "circle right."
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  8. #8
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    Default

    At least you didn't get the comment that Bill Woods talks about in Dressage Unscrambled -- "Nice round bears."
    The aids are the legs, the hands, the weight of the rider, the whip, the caress, the voice and the use of extraneous circumstances. ~ General Decarpentry
    www.reflectionsonriding.com



  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    Might be whats official but it's not what makes sense in the context of what the OP posted.

    I mean..."needs circle right over the top line?" or "needs rounder over the topline" ?
    The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
    Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.



  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eclectic Horseman View Post
    Here are links to the official scribing abbreviations accepted in the USA and Canada.

    There is no "OR." Would be "circle right."
    Goodness, I feel like I'm being irascible today ... but the "official" abbreviation makes absolutely no sense in the context of the OP's test comments:

    "could be straighter and Or" and another said "needs Or over the topline".

    As a scribe, my job's to help riders understand what the judge said about a score. This thread supports my belief that symbols often get in the way of understanding rather than promoting it.
    Last edited by AllWeatherGal; Mar. 25, 2011 at 12:37 PM. Reason: yeah ... exactly what analise said!
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  11. #11
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    Default

    The "could be straighter and Or" was as I entered down the centerline, so it's definitely not circle right (although the abbreviation itself makes sense).



  12. #12
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hntrjmprpro45 View Post
    The "could be straighter and Or" was as I entered down the centerline, so it's definitely not circle right (although the abbreviation itself makes sense).

    Sounds like the scribe could not keep up. Judge may have said "could be straighter and/or..." and the scribe didn't get the last bit. I doubt that it was an abbreviation.

    Or the scribe couldn't understand what the judge was saying. If the "or" was really "more" then it starts to make more sense.
    "Against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain" ~Friedrich Schiller



  13. #13
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    Default

    Ive seen this abbreviation before and to me, it meant 'rounder'. It took me a while to figure it out.



  14. #14
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    Default

    My vote is for the Or meaning "rounder". Sometimes the only way to figure comments out are through the context. I've had scribes (and judges) that write out the words but it's so scribbled that you're pretty much just guessing.
    I always read my tests while still at the show and sometimes have to ask other people for help deciphering!
    Hoppe, Hoppe, Reiter...
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  15. #15
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    Default

    I wish it was accepted to use a laptop or something to type for scribing, instead of writing by hand. Then I'd be able to scribe (I can't due to being able to write for a limited period of time due to arthritis) and there'd be less confusion abut handwriting.

    (Though that assumes people who can type as fast or faster than they can write - I am a very quick typist, so it wouldn't be a big problem for me.)



  16. #16
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    Wink

    I suspect rounder, which would make sense in both contexts. Not all scribes, it would appear, know there is a rule book for scribes.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  17. #17
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    Default

    Oh for Pete's sake- sometimes you have to grab ANYONE to scribe for a time in a ring= they may never have seen the official abbreviations, they may do just what the judge tells them to= or they may be soooooooo clueless they drive the judge nutzzzzz trying to keep them on line and on task.

    Be grateful you had a judge with a reasonable scribe, ask questions whenever you don't understand. Thank the nameless scribe who sits in the hot/cold/uncomfortable box/car/truck/tent/etc to memoralize your ride.



  18. #18
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    Aug. 17, 2002
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    Question

    Most judges have told me to write everything out and then often get mad when I ask for repetition when they go too fast and/or mumble half.
    Type it?? WOW!!! couldn't do that.
    I try to not use abrev. on training through first level if the rider is obviously a newbee and do consonental abrev. or use the hand book shorthand.
    Or ??duh????



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