The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 88
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2005
    Posts
    476

    Default Anyone ever owned a Zebra?

    What did you do with it? Ever trained to ride? Did you horses care?

    Thanks!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2009
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, CND
    Posts
    2,191

    Default

    Very few zebras have been trained to be ridden, they are not like horses and naturally quite skittish (like an Arabian on drugs skittish...).

    Are you talking full-sized or mini?
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2003
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    644

    Default

    They come in mini-size?! I did not need to know that.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2009
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, CND
    Posts
    2,191

    Default

    Now that I'm actually looking for information about that, I'm thinking the "miniature zebras" you see at country fairs may be babies or mini zorses not true zebras :S.

    Oops...
    "For some people it's not enough to just be a horse's bum, you have to be sea biscuit's bum" -anon.
    Nes' Farm Blog ~ DesigNes.ca
    Need You Now Equine



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2006
    Location
    Southeast Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,671

    Default

    I believe there was a thread about Zebra's a while ago. Complete with photos of them being ridden and driven. Interesting stuff.

    MINI Zebras????



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    7,380

    Default

    First you need to remember they are WILD ANIMALS, not actually domesticated, though they may be handled. You have to get into a totally different mindset with zebras, they are NOT and NEVER will think like a horse when they react to things. And while they kick, usually they first bite. Like an alligator, with huge mouth and terrible force. Very FAST reactions to everything, because slow Zebras die in the wild.

    The Zebra crosses seem to come and go, in populartity. I have seen horse/pony crosses, and donkey crosses with Zebras. The resulting animals are often sort of striped, partly striped on joints, spine area, faded stripes on bodies. They may or may not be easier to handle than the straight Zebras.

    You may have local regulations about keeping wildlife to meet, Zebras are in that catagory. This could include special vaccination programs, with Rabies high on the list. Can you find a Vet to aid you with keeping it healthy? I don't think many Farriers will want to work on it, so Vet with tranquilizers or stocks may be needed for hoof care. When they fight, they are awful!! Few people have harsh enough ground surfaces for it to be self-trimming.

    There are old-time photos of Zebras doing things, often Circus related. What you don't see is how MANY hours of training, methods applied to gain success, to make the photo possible. Can't think it was easy or quick, always painless to handler OR Zebras.

    Horses are pretty exciting, so Zebras would be over the limit in "fun" to me! Don't get hurt if you go that route.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,532

    Default

    Remember there are also different species and some are...more intense than others. At our zoo the Grevy's Zebra was considered a mandatory code one (dangerous animal escape) meaning any time they were out of a controlled situation we were supposed to initiate the dangerous-animal recovery protocol including moving visitors to secure areas and mobilizing the response team. The common zebras were considered code twos--could be considered serious or not depending on the situation. The vets also had special holding stalls for working on all the zebras, with chest-high barriers (like up to the vet's neck, practically) for doing any blood draws or vax as they kick and kick HARD. Tranquilizing was either done in the holding stall or via blow dart.

    They CAN be kept, but they can also be really nasty and very dangerous when they decide they don't feel like cooperating. I'm not sure it's something I consider worth the hassle unless I was running a wildlife park.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2009
    Location
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Posts
    1,002

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dispatcher View Post
    I believe there was a thread about Zebra's a while ago. Complete with photos of them being ridden and driven. Interesting stuff.
    Also complete with the expected assertions that zebras are difficult to train, unrideable, always vicious, etc. However, I agree they are more challenging than horses and not domesticable. My only contact with a zebra was with a plains zebra stallion and he was friendly enough to engage in some good-natured mutual grooming. Interestingly, he smelled like a donkey not a horse.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,532

    Default

    To me, when I've been close to the zoo zebras, they also have that...donkey/mule smell, if that makes any sense. And their hide LOOKS like a mule's, too. I didn't touch because 1. I like having all my fingers and 2. I have no desire to get zapped by an electric fence. That's another thing, I'd want really good fencing for them!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2006
    Location
    Dallas, NC
    Posts
    2,313

    Default

    Down the road from me someone has two zebras in a 6 foot high cyclone fence. Hell it might even be 4 ft high! I will have to check. But I think it's only 6 foot.

    Pretty weird riding down and road and "Oh look! Zebras!"
    I want a signature but I have nothing original to say except: "STHU and RIDE!!!

    Wonderful COTHER's I've met: belleellis, stefffic, snkstacres and janedoe726.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2001
    Location
    Los Angeles, California
    Posts
    3,448

    Default

    I seem to remember that after x generations (3? 4?) in captivity most animals can be domesticated.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2009
    Location
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Posts
    1,002

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 5 View Post
    I seem to remember that after x generations (3? 4?) in captivity most animals can be domesticated.
    That would imply a change in genetic makeup over those generations, and for that to occur the breeder would have to select for amenable temperament and against nasty. I guess it's just about possible over that number of generations - Belyaev succeeded with silver foxes over 10 or so.

    ETA: Just found this interesting snippet about the foxes...

    http://sahelhound.com/2008/12/31/bel...ng-experiment/



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2006
    Posts
    1,362

    Default

    My two cents:

    There is a difference between domestication vs. being able to be kept alive in captivity.

    Selective breeding to get tamer animals can also result in physical changes -- the best example is Russian fox farmers who wanted a tamer fox. The got it, but the tame foxes had more dog-like qualities and behavior, and lost their distinctive color (which is why they were bred for fur in the first place). Picture here, they look like pomeranians with foxy tails http://www.scientificamerican.com/bl...-ru-2010-09-02

    I think that zebras can (clearly) be kept and bred in captivity, and trained to a certain degree. But domesticated like a horse or donkey? Not without a long term breeding program and who knows , you might just end up with dun-colored ponies. Again, my 2 cents.

    Edited to add: fburton beat me to it!
    ...somewhere between the talent and the potato....



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2006
    Location
    Southeast Pennsylvania
    Posts
    2,671

    Default

    coincidentally, I was in the dentist's office the other day reading the National Geographic article about the Russain fox farmers. They DO look different than wild foxes.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2009
    Location
    Glasgow, Scotland
    Posts
    1,002

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dispatcher View Post
    coincidentally, I was in the dentist's office the other day reading the National Geographic article about the Russain fox farmers. They DO look different than wild foxes.
    Given what happened to the foxes as a result of selective breeding, maybe zebras would lose their stripes and end up looking like mules (and not just smelling like 'em)!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2010
    Location
    All 'round Canadia
    Posts
    5,435

    Default

    OMG, I want one of those doggy foxes*!


    * ok not really as I don't want any kind of house pet right now, but they're so cute



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,099

    Default

    There are zebra websites where you can buy them. And zorses. I think they are great looking.

    My vet has one. When i bought Cloudy 10 yrs ago, I met my vet. Vet said too bad CLoudy was no longer stallion, as he'd like to breed his mare to him. Thinking the vet had some wonderful tb or wb mare, I said oh what do you have? And he said "zebra" Ok so much for my then dapple grey and white WB. There would have been a pin striped foal.
    Supposedly the zebra mare is mean. I've never seen her, just pix in my vet's office.
    Funny thing was my vet did not know what type of zebra he had when I told him there are 4 or 5 kinds. (I remembered that from reading my father's national geographic mags when I was a kid.)

    As for foxes, when I lived in ST Louis, Missouri has lots of wild animal farms, a pet shop downtown had 2 cute baby foxes in a cage for sale. Too cute. Sadly today I saw an ad in the feed s tore for a hunt at a fox pen here. Guys catch foxes in traps and put them in pens, and then turn dogs on them to hunt and kill them. Foxes are canids and related to dogs. Hunters here are not very sporting.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,339

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 5 View Post
    I seem to remember that after x generations (3? 4?) in captivity most animals can be domesticated.
    Not so. We have only managed to domesticate about 11 of the large mammal species of the world. Zebras have never been domesticated, despite multiple attempts. There are some studies which suggest there is a certain gene or set of genes that must be present for true domestication to be possible.

    Remember that tame does not equal domesticated.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 1999
    Location
    Cypress, near Houston, Texas
    Posts
    8,501

    Default

    As a lawyer, I have come to learn just how dangerous Zebras can be after being consulted on a couple of matters.

    One guy was just filling big water trough in the zebra's paddock. Had the hose hanging over the fence with his hands just over the fence as well.

    The zebra grabbed him and dragged him into the paddock and tried to kill him. It tore his arm OFF. The guy escaped with his life by managing to roll under the fence.

    And this was supposedly a "pet" zebra!
    Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2000
    Location
    Alvin, TX
    Posts
    1,050

    Default

    I read a very long article once by someone who had trained zebras for the circus. It is not an undertaking to be taken lightly, keeping zebras. The author stressed over and over again that it takes constant diligence and working EVERY SINGLE DAY to even keep the zebras 'manageable.' He said one day without handling them - and would take him days or weeks to regain lost ground. Plus the fact that their reactions are many times faster than a horse's and they kick/bite and ask questions later. And that even after generations of breeding, and being kept in captivity, those instincts stay pretty much intact.

    I'll admire them from afar, thankyouverymuch.



Similar Threads

  1. A man goes into a bar with a Zebra and a Parrot...
    By RougeEmpire in forum Off Course
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: May. 23, 2012, 08:37 PM
  2. Zebra jumping....
    By OTTB FTW in forum Eventing
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Jun. 17, 2011, 09:16 AM
  3. Zack the Zebra...
    By wcporter in forum Off Course
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Jun. 6, 2011, 12:08 PM
  4. zebra gets some ass....
    By Thomas_1 in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: Aug. 1, 2010, 07:22 PM
  5. Zebra anyone???
    By DiscoMom in forum Off Course
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: Oct. 29, 2008, 10:44 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •