The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 39
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    2,045

    Default Mounting without a mounting block

    Setting: older rider with winter weight gain and green horse go on a short trail ride.

    Yep, I'm not young anymore, have gained weight and did not exercise this winter so I know right off the bat I have set myself up in the wrong way. But I've been riding my greenie a couple of times a week and yesterday went for a short ride with a friend. There were several gates to open and we shared the task. At one gate there wasn't a "natural" source of mounting block (like a dip in the trail or a tree stump) so after closing the gate I attempted to mount like I had when young and agile. It so didn't work.

    What or how do you get back into the saddle?
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 5, 2009
    Location
    In a barn
    Posts
    966

    Default

    I don't/I can't. I would have refused to take my turn 'getting off to open gates' and that's how I would've handled that.

    You made me laugh though - thanks



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 12, 2006
    Posts
    2,045

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TBMaggie View Post
    I don't/I can't. I would have refused to take my turn 'getting off to open gates' and that's how I would've handled that.

    You made me laugh though - thanks
    You are making me laugh so next time I'll tell my trail partner she gets to open all the gates in the big field. Isn't she the lucky one?
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2001
    Location
    NW Washington
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    After I lost weight, that's what happened to me. Once I had the ability to get on and off from the ground I got to be the designated open the gates, pick up fallen stuff, etc etc person. LOL



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2009
    Location
    Boerne, Texas
    Posts
    463

    Default

    I definitely can never be the designated gate opener/retriever of dropped items. I am 4'11" and my horses are all 16.3h+. Getting back on without a mounting block is simply NOT going to happen. Maybe I should try to train my horses to kneel down like a camel or an elephant...
    Tricia Veley-First Flight Farm
    Boerne, Texas
    830-537-4150 phone/830-537-4154 fax
    www.firstflightfarm.com
    FFF Page on Facebook: Become a fan!
    FFF Channel on YouTube: See videos



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,058

    Default

    Well, with my horse...I can't. I can't get my left foot high enough and still get any bounce off the right (because I'm standing on my tiptoes on that foot to reach!) And I cannot jump high enough without the stirrup to scramble on. So...someone else would be getting up and down, or I'd need to borrow a shorter horse! (Like the GV---I can get on HIM, he's just wide, not tall!)



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    38,477

    Default

    Well, that is part and parcel of getting old for some of us.
    A few years ago, I had a very tall horse, I am very short, the horse was having a silly moment after we went thru a gate and was shying from something badly.
    I tried to get on anyway and pulled the whole head of the hip off the socket, that luckily went back in on it's own.
    Doctor said I was getting old and that some years after menopause, for some, tendons and ligaments are not what they used to be, so quit straining like that.

    I started using a mounting block and two years ago, this time the horse tried to walk off away from the mounting block before I was on, I strained and tore the rotary cuff, that will be surgically repaired in a few weeks.

    Moral of my story, be careful, because sometimes, by no fault of your own, your body won't work right and pulling yourself up on a horse when it takes much straining is one of those times.

    I used to vault, but that also necessitates a young, limber body, that won't break when strained.
    You have to learn your limits, or you pay for it.

    All that not even thinking on the strain on the horse's body from someone ungainly scrambling up it's side.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,058

    Default

    It's not even getting old--I was thirteen or fourteen when I racked up my left knee (using a mounting block) when the horse stepped off and I swung around. (Then a year later I wiped out the OTHER knee dancing. Whoohoo.)

    I am all in favor of mounting blocks. Tall ones.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    Boston MA
    Posts
    642

    Default

    5'3" rider and 16.2 horse. I just don't mount from the ground...I find a rock or a log or something to equalize the height disparity between us. My horse is not super tolerant either-he prefers to be mounted quickly and quietly, no scrambling and trying to climb up on him-he will just leave



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    8,909

    Default

    Each day I miss the good old days when i could leap bareback onto my 16 hand horse and not touch his rump and not break one of my long fingernails.

    Now I've progressed from a 2 step mounting block to a 3 step and am thinking about those hoists that the knights of the round table used.

    Fortunately, my 16.2 horse will crowd a gate and allow me to open it while sitting in the saddle. And we have a deal when trail riding: He does not make me have an unplanned dismount.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2011
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Get a shorter horse? LOL! All I can think of is practicing at home, and making sure you do it right so you don't pull too much on your horse's back. Unforunately I seem to always to be gate opener/closer as my horse is 14.2 hh (I am 5'4") LOL



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2009
    Posts
    1,881

    Default

    At home I have an actual step ladder that I use to mount. If I have to get off on the trail I have to go through all the hassle of either, lowering the stirrup or finding a hollow to put the horse in or something to stand on. So, needless to say, I only dismount off property when all else fails.

    One of the first things I teach my horses is to "park out" or stand for mounting at the block (ladder) because not only am I old, I'm short too. Besides mounting with a step or block, they say is easier on tack and horse. I try to mount from the right (for my leathers' sake) also. Talk about awkward!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2002
    Location
    north carolina
    Posts
    277

    Smile

    Ok tell me why you can't open and close gates from horseback. I used to ride trail in Colorado and horses were trained to stand still,back and side pass, do whatever was necessary to open and close gates, all kinds of gates . A good horse would help with her head.
    I hear that you're riding big horses but I've opened 16 foot gates slowly backing and turns on the forehand. so what's up. Also on the equestrian with disabilities forum there was a thread on mounting problems. Decided we needed to teach our horses to bow!
    My horse better open and close the gates because I cannot mount without a block, a tree , a ditch.
    ??



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    38,477

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by walkers View Post
    Ok tell me why you can't open and close gates from horseback. I used to ride trail in Colorado and horses were trained to stand still,back and side pass, do whatever was necessary to open and close gates, all kinds of gates . A good horse would help with her head.
    I hear that you're riding big horses but I've opened 16 foot gates slowly backing and turns on the forehand. so what's up. Also on the equestrian with disabilities forum there was a thread on mounting problems. Decided we needed to teach our horses to bow!
    My horse better open and close the gates because I cannot mount without a block, a tree , a ditch.
    ??
    Here, we have wire gates and they are not safe to open from a horse, if you even could do that.
    I do threaten to leave a bucket by each gate, so I can get back on.

    Stretching a horse out, lowering the stirrup, all that helps when you still can somewhat get on.
    There is a time that you can't get even with a stretched horse, or can't get all the way up from a stirrup let down, as your leg then doesn't reach over the saddle.

    I guess we could have the horse lay down, then raise with us aboard.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,058

    Default

    Well, at my barn, I can't reach the gate chains while mounted. They're locked with chains and padlocks and unless I were hanging from a trick saddle I wouldn't be able to get at them. If they're unlocked, I can open them mounted, but if they're not I need a key and to be on the ground.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    7,881

    Default

    I've got one of these:

    http://www.amazon.com/Easy-Mount-Hor.../dp/B0012DQEP4

    Fine device.

    G.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2011
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Here, we have wire gates and they are not safe to open from a horse, if you even could do that.
    I do threaten to leave a bucket by each gate, so I can get back on.

    Stretching a horse out, lowering the stirrup, all that helps when you still can somewhat get on.
    There is a time that you can't get even with a stretched horse, or can't get all the way up from a stirrup let down, as your leg then doesn't reach over the saddle.

    I guess we could have the horse lay down, then raise with us aboard.
    Ditto this, that is how our gates are, wire. Impossible to open/close from horseback. We do lots of riding in cattle pastures and many of the gates are also cattle guards with a wire gate beside it that we have to go through.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    38,477

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guilherme View Post
    I've got one of these:

    http://www.amazon.com/Easy-Mount-Hor.../dp/B0012DQEP4

    Fine device.

    G.


    I have one of those, but have to weld a 10" extension for it to work for me, it is way too short.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    38,477

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hoofbeats02 View Post
    Ditto this, that is how our gates are, wire. Impossible to open/close from horseback. We do lots of riding in cattle pastures and many of the gates are also cattle guards with a wire gate beside it that we have to go through.
    Here, we tease that you can tell how old the ranch owner is by the cattleguards, so he can drive around without needing to get in and out to open gates and with metal gates by each cattleguard, so when horseback it doesn't has to dismount to open gates.

    Cowboy law is that, riding up to a gate, the youngest one not a kid gets the honor to get off and open the gate.
    Kids feel very adult when they finally get to be gate openers.
    Adults feel old when they don't ever have to open gates any more.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Location
    Orlean, Va
    Posts
    2,043

    Smile Teach your horse to help you

    You can teach your horse to help you with the gate. Works as long as the gate is on working hinges and vaguely balanced. You may need to offer to put the latch up to an easier height.

    I can't get on and off without a tall mounting block or similar in height object. (Back injury)
    I used clicker training, (positive re-enforcement) to shape the behavior I wanted the horse to do. I started by standing on the ground next to an easy,convenient gate. Every time the horse made the begining of the move toward the gate, she got a click and then a small favorite treat. By having her target my hand for the treat, I could move my hand to the gate and have her touch the gate with her nose. Every time that there was a big correct move, she got a "jackpot" of lots of treats, fed one at a time, and tons of praise. This process takes time, especially at first when the whole concept of rewarding thinking is new. Once the horse has the concept and understands the click is a cue of doing the right thing, the following things you want to teach get much, much easier.You have a 2 way communication system, so there fewer random, confusing, frustrating attempts. The horse will try harder and shut down less often.

    There is quite a bit on the net about clicker training.The version I use is the one that marine animal and zoo keepers use.

    P.m. me if you want to discuss it further.



Similar Threads

  1. The Mounting Block Can be A Great Horse Toy
    By Mike Matson in forum Off Course
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: Aug. 19, 2012, 01:22 AM
  2. Mounting from a mounting block
    By anexalter in forum Off Course
    Replies: 39
    Last Post: Oct. 15, 2010, 09:15 AM
  3. cheap mounting block?
    By 17hTBmare in forum Off Course
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: Sep. 21, 2010, 05:35 PM
  4. What kind of mounting block do you use?
    By dacasodivine in forum Off Course
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: Nov. 21, 2009, 09:05 AM
  5. Building Plans For A Mounting Block
    By IrishDeclan in forum Off Course
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: Feb. 19, 2009, 10:50 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness