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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2005
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    Southeast, VA
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    448

    Default Farm/ Family Dog

    We think we are ready to get another dog. This dog is mainly a dog to grow up with the kids (you know how alot of us had the special friend?) play and be active. That being said I don't want a dog to push the kids down as they are still small (age 4, 2 and a newborn). Our FIL's collie is a very sweet dog BUT he pushes the kids down.

    My DH wants a Lab, but I'm not so sure about them. They aren't very 'pretty' dogs and I'm used to having a pretty looking dog (like yorkie's or something cute). I kinda like corgies or aussie's.
    Which do you think is the best small farm (2.5acres)family dog for kids?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 28, 2003
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    4,260

    Default

    IF they haven't decided to keep him check out this dog from another post. I'm not a dog person at all and I'm tempted

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=293189



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2007
    Location
    PA
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    Default

    Standard Poodle. No question. They are loyal, protective of children, great at groundhog control, smart as a whip and easy dogs to have around.

    Have had them for years. Got my last one when my children were 3 and 1. Had a baby the next summer. She calls the poodle her "Irish Twin" This dog has never knocked a child down, was always very careful of a baby lying on a playmat on the floor. Truly she adjusted her interaction to the age and capability of the child. Played rough with the girls as they got older and asked her to but was gentle as can be with a baby.

    She's 12 now and still likes to peek in baby carriages - I think she misses having them small too.

    Just wait - the other poodle people will be chiming in momentarily.



  4. #4
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    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
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    16,668

    Default

    When you say the collie "pushes them down" what do you mean? We had a rough coat collie (Lassie type, not a border collie) and she was the best farm/kid dog ever. Horses loved her, cats loved her, she was my Dr. Doolittle.

    She did play tag with the kids when they wanted to...absolutely hysterical, and herded them together if they strayed too far. Not a mean bone in her body. But, she would protect her family no matter what.

    We have a lab, my brother's always had labs, and I've found them a bit too "energetic" for small children.

    My neighbors have aussies and we've had problems with them chasing the horses...might be a training issue (not my problem). Electric solved that problem.

    Corgis are sweet, but I'd take a rough or smooth coat collie any day over any other dog. Just make sure you do your research, they do come with some medical problems if you're not careful.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2007
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    PA
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    Default

    Laura, does your collie stay clean at the barn? When I was a teen there was a gorgeous collie at the barn. All the other dogs would come home looking a mess from playing in the water jump and hunting all over but that collie looked like she never even stepped in a puddle. She was such a lady and always immaculate. Don't know how she did it!



  6. #6
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    Aug. 5, 2005
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    Southeast, VA
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    Default

    When I mean he pushes them down I mean he leans on them with all his weight and it knocks them down. He stayed with us for a couple of weeks and I would have to put him up whent he kids were out playing because he would just lean on them causing my daughter to fall down on the drive way hitting her head. There was another time when he followed me to the barn and my almost 4yr old was walking in front of him. He just pushed him down to walk past him.

    He's actually used to be my dog several years (he's now 9yrs)ago but he would slap our yorkie (she was just dignosed with a liver disease)and so we had to find a new home for him. I had bought him to show (he's a smooth collie) but it turned out he was to high engery for a beginner. So that went out the door when I found out it was about $600 to have someone show him for me.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
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    18,472

    Default

    Dogs have to be trained to not push people, some breeds may be more inclined to do so but its not really a breed thing.

    I have raised many dogs with my kids who are now 7 and 11... The key, IMO, in avoiding dangerous physical incidences is in teaching the dog, from day one, that in order to get ANY KIND OF ATTENTION BE IT FOOD, CUDDLES, TALKING TO... Anything at all... He must sit and stay seated. So easy to teach, saves you from endless problems. You can also have the kids make the dogs do it which goes a long way to establish with the dog who is who in the pack/family. I am no Dog Whisperer but i know this one trick works
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2010
    Location
    Arlington, VA
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    257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by morgansnmind View Post
    We think we are ready to get another dog. This dog is mainly a dog to grow up with the kids (you know how alot of us had the special friend?) play and be active. That being said I don't want a dog to push the kids down as they are still small (age 4, 2 and a newborn). Our FIL's collie is a very sweet dog BUT he pushes the kids down.

    My DH wants a Lab, but I'm not so sure about them. They aren't very 'pretty' dogs and I'm used to having a pretty looking dog (like yorkie's or something cute). I kinda like corgies or aussie's.
    Which do you think is the best small farm (2.5acres)family dog for kids?
    Wow, we have very different ideas of "pretty." Speaking as a former child with high-energy large dogs in my household . . . getting knocked down was part of the fun! Let the man get a Lab!



  9. #9
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    Aug. 5, 2005
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    Southeast, VA
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    Default

    I don't think getting pushed down on a cement driveway, in our cinderblock barn, or on the brick pourch is alot of fun. It just made the kids scared of the dog.

    There is a dog posted on craigslist that we are going to take a look at ..I'm still really unsure about a lab but DH wants to go look. A 2yr old black lab that is going to the pound if they can't find her a home (first home was broken up, second home was only temp. but the prev. owners ditched her and never got her).



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 16, 2005
    Location
    ON, Canada
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    400

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lcw579 View Post
    Standard Poodle. No question. They are loyal, protective of children, great at groundhog control, smart as a whip and easy dogs to have around.

    Have had them for years. Got my last one when my children were 3 and 1. Had a baby the next summer. She calls the poodle her "Irish Twin" This dog has never knocked a child down, was always very careful of a baby lying on a playmat on the floor. Truly she adjusted her interaction to the age and capability of the child. Played rough with the girls as they got older and asked her to but was gentle as can be with a baby.

    She's 12 now and still likes to peek in baby carriages - I think she misses having them small too.

    Just wait - the other poodle people will be chiming in momentarily.
    This.

    My kids were 2,5 and 8 when we got our poodle.

    I adore my standard poodle. I've even put an order in for another.



  11. #11
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    Mar. 19, 2006
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    201

    Default

    My opinion may not be popular, but I think you should wait until the kids are a little older. Labs are puppies until at least 2 years old, and need a lot of exercise. It sounds like perhaps you are a small dog person anyway.



  12. #12
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    Aug. 10, 2010
    Location
    NC/SC
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    FWIW, I have a 4 y/o Lab mix (she was a rescue, think she is probably 99% lab or possibly mix w/ Golden) and she is WONDERFUL with children. We do not have kids, but we have a 18month old nephew and good friends who have 8 and 10 year old boys and a 10y/o daughter who is special needs. Our dog is GREAT with all the kids, she will roughhouse with the boys and she will be very ginger and careful with the baby and special needs child. She even lets our nephew pull on her ears, pull himself up on her (grabbing chunks of fur), and curl up with her on her bed! She is also great around the horses. We adopted her when she was around a year old and she was even great with our friend's toddler girls then. In general, Labs are extremely high energy and I wouldn't recommend starting out with a puppy with young kids, but with an older dog you have a better idea of their personality and we really lucked out with our dog.

    So I guess I am advocating not so much for a Lab as a breed, but for a young adult dog that is more settled and predictable in its personality than a puppy. Good luck and have fun picking out your new family member!



  13. #13
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    Dec. 6, 2000
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    SE Mass
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    Default

    I have two Standard Poodles. See them in my profile pic. Love them. But I agree, you need to train them to behave well with kids, though it is very easy. Admittedly, our rescue (the apricot in the pic) came to us because he was a bit out of control in a family with kids, but that family was a single mom, and they got him on an impulse from a pet store. He is learning manners. My white Spoo spent a week-end with my niece and nephew (5 and 8), and by the end of the week-end, he was kid proof, and the 5 year old wanted a big white poodle.

    We clip them naked so that they are easy to care for and stay clean.



  14. #14
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    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lcw579 View Post
    Laura, does your collie stay clean at the barn? When I was a teen there was a gorgeous collie at the barn. All the other dogs would come home looking a mess from playing in the water jump and hunting all over but that collie looked like she never even stepped in a puddle. She was such a lady and always immaculate. Don't know how she did it!
    She did. I did spray her with Show Sheen after a bath and grooming...helped repel the dirt. But she could lie in a dirt pile and come out fairly clean.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  15. #15
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    Feb. 17, 2010
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    Purcellville, VA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    Dogs have to be trained to not push people, some breeds may be more inclined to do so but its not really a breed thing.

    I have raised many dogs with my kids who are now 7 and 11... The key, IMO, in avoiding dangerous physical incidences is in teaching the dog, from day one, that in order to get ANY KIND OF ATTENTION BE IT FOOD, CUDDLES, TALKING TO... Anything at all... He must sit and stay seated. So easy to teach, saves you from endless problems. You can also have the kids make the dogs do it which goes a long way to establish with the dog who is who in the pack/family. I am no Dog Whisperer but i know this one trick works
    Totally agree with EqT. Training has a big thing do do with being a good farm/family dog or not.

    My BO now at the place I rent has two labs and they are the most unruly beasts ever. They have scratched the $h!t out of my car from jumping all over it when my dog was in there, they constantly run away and chase the horses and knock the little 2yo down all the time.

    My parents have a poodle that bites the kids for no reason and also a chorkie that jumps on my little ones and growls all the time at them as well.

    Personally, I love my JRT. He was a bit hesitant of the kiddies when they first arrived, but now they can tug on him-pull ears-steal food-take treats out of his mouth....and he could care less. He's great on the farm, no jumping, never runs away and is the best farm dog ever. He's a better mouser than any of our cats and he's trained that OUT means out of the fence line where ever we are.

    He's a bit attached to me (super crazy anxiety, since he always goes everywhere with me) but other than that he's just perfect.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2008
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    Longing to be where I once was.....
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    2,188

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    I would suggest a Golden Retriever. We had one who grew up with our 3 kids and around our horses and other livestock. She protected the kids from other dogs, people and once a sick raccoon. She followed them where ever they went and was a great dog. Yes they can get burrs, but she stayed clean enough and was beautiful. We have a Aussie/Border Collie x who can be a bit quirky around our now teenage kids. Ours is a " one person dog" ( me) and small kids might worry me. But, I don't know if they can all be like that.



  17. #17
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    FYI, a lot of breeders and rescues won't sell/adopt to people with children under five. A child's face is just about the height of a dog's face, which can be very intimidating to a dog.

    If you've already had trouble successfully training a collie (IMO one of the easiest dogs to train), you should probably either not buy a dog until your children or older or look for an older dog trained with children. It sounds like you have your hands full with small children anyway...a new dog at this time might not be the best addition to your home.

    My 2 1/2 year old lab is still a puppy and certainly not child proofed. My collie was child friendly from the day I brought her home.

    We have two rescues, both dumped at our farm at 6 months. They were more difficult to train than a puppy. A puppy has a socialization learning window at 8 to 15? weeks. During that time, you want to expose them to as many people and experiences without frightening them as possible. This is also the time to instill good manners.

    Depending on the breed, there is another window later, about 5 months or so. Personally, I wouldn't take a 2 year old from a family threatening to take him to the shelter if I had small children. What's going to happen to him if he doesn't work out?
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2007
    Location
    TN
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    Really you just need a dog of ANY breed with the right personality. My sister's doberman was a heck of a lot better with kids than some golden retrievers I know. I'd say look for a smart, friendly, but calm dog. Anything too boisterous or stupid is just going to run around bouncing off of small children. Look for the one that's standing there wagging it's tail, not the one that's climbing it's cage door to see you. When you go to meet a dog, see if it can handle a little roughness. Your kids won't know the right way to interact with a dog, so give it some harder pats, tug (gently!) on ears, play with it's feet, gently push on them to see if they'll move away. A good dog for kids will either not react or simply remove themselves.

    And for training, make your rules crystal clear and rock solid. No jumping, pushing, pawing for treats, crazed running inside. Ever. Not even when he's been good lately.
    "Things turn out best for the people who make the best of the way things turn out." ~John Wooden

    Phoenix Animal Rescue



  19. #19
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    Aug. 12, 2010
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    Westford, Massachusetts
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    Do you still consider yourself not ready for a high energy dog? If so, I would not consider an Aussie. Cattle Dog/Aussie/Border Collie...they are the poster children for high energy! AND, they are very smart and need a firm leader or they will be the boss. They need lots of regular exercise that provides an intellectual challenge for them or they will get into trouble. I don't know Corgis well, but I'd guess they are similar...herding breeds are high energy and they are thinkers. Awesome dogs, but I don't think I'd ever recommend most herders for beginners or people less than confident with dogs.



  20. #20
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    Jan. 17, 2008
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    Dutchess County, New York
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    Definitely don't get a working or herding breed with your hands full with small children, and 2.5 acres. The dog won't have a job, or enough of your time/attention.

    I disagree that your kids are too young; my dogs came first, and my three sons were born after, so I've always had newborns and babies, and toddlers etc and dogs. I think it is valuable for the kids to grow up with dogs.

    I would not get a dog so small that it could be hurt by the kids; I would not get a dog that is prone to knock kids down (the one lab we lived near relentlessly knocked down my then 4 year old), I would get and easygoing, gentle dog.

    I vote for not a puppy, but I don't really like puppies anyway. They are a TON of work, and you don't always know what you are going to end up with.

    I am sure you will be able to find the right dog for you with some research and searching.



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