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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2010
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    Default Snapping up too soon

    So the other critique thread has me thinking. I feel like I snap up too soon. Like I don't let my horse complete his jump and then I sit up with my upper body but then never sit totally straight up.

    Here's a video.... Neither of us were taking this too serious since the jumps were so low. I'd come out of the corners and then start thinking about lunch. My horse was obviously thinking the same....

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieOLdjDWSQQ

    Exercises, ideas, thoughts on how to fix this? I feel like it looks "jerky" and have been working on it.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
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    down the road from bar.ka
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    Default

    Not that bad.

    I think you are getting yourself into trouble trying to do too much over such a little fence on a very quiet and capable horse-it really does not need much release.

    Maybe more work in the half seat-between full seat and two point-with your fanny in the saddle but hip angle closed. Think you are trying to go from full seat to two point here and it's not needed, you could stay in half seat with just a short crest release and this would smooth right out for you. Maybe trying to throw your shouleder a little too, to make up from no thrust from the jump.

    That half seat work sucks, it's hard, least it was for me. Try staying in it on an extended canter over low jumps or crossrails...or even ground poles. Set them as singles on the long side along the quarter line and just stay in half seat and go around and around. I lasted half a lap when I started this.

    Anyway, that should help you tone down your upper body a little.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2010
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    Default

    Thanks F8.

    This saddle was a HUGE pIA for us. It didn't really fit Chance or me very well and I didn't have my Amerigo at the time so to keep off his back, I'd try to sort of "perch" to free him up. For whatever reason I feel sit down to jump out.

    I'll try that. It sounds like a good plan. I do tend to lean from my shoulder and ride over my hand, so we work on that BUNCH. Clearly wasn't thinking of it here. To cure that I've been working on trotting poles and fences with one hand behind my back. I like to lean to the right a bunch too.



  4. #4
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    Jun. 17, 2001
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    down the road from bar.ka
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    Default

    Mind over matter...once you know you are doing something and can feel yourself doing it? You can fix it with some focus on that problem.

    You'll get there. Nice horse BTW, good partnership-he doesn't need much so you can concentrate on you.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Zone 6
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    Default

    I developed this habit after riding a horse that would let out a huge buck after oxers.

    To cure it (on a different horse) I would sometimes force myself to stay in two point two full strides after every jump. Or place a pole after the jump and make yourself stay up out of the tack until you cross that pole.



  6. #6
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    Mar. 26, 2010
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by findeight View Post
    Mind over matter...once you know you are doing something and can feel yourself doing it? You can fix it with some focus on that problem.

    You'll get there. Nice horse BTW, good partnership-he doesn't need much so you can concentrate on you.
    Thanks F8. He's the total apple of my eye. I got him for a song because the girl who owned him was moving out of state. She knew we were a match when after I rode him I was helping her with other horses and he SCREAMED and ran the fence line until I paid attention to him again. He's very much "you're my mommy" type of guy. I think he's the best horse on earth, but then again I think everyone should feel that way about their horse.

    Sparkle Boy, oddly enough he does like to buck after big efforts sometimes. Mostly just playful "look at how cool I am" stuff. But he will let me know when he's tired of me riding like a petrified freak.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    Woodland, Ca
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    Default

    I haven't looked at the video because I have dial up. But generally if you are opening too soon it is because your base of support isn't there. Most often the rider is pinching with their knee, loose in the lower leg and pushing the leg forward in the air instead of keeping it on the horse. Sometimes they also jump ahead of the horse.



  8. #8
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    Mar. 26, 2010
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fourmares View Post
    I haven't looked at the video because I have dial up. But generally if you are opening too soon it is because your base of support isn't there. Most often the rider is pinching with their knee, loose in the lower leg and pushing the leg forward in the air instead of keeping it on the horse. Sometimes they also jump ahead of the horse.
    Oh yes, the very first fence I jumped ahead, pulled on the reins and he chipped in.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2006
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    Virginia
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    Default

    My first thought when watching your video is that I'd venture your core muscles are weak. You don't just come up early, you hollow out. Lots of core work, pilates especially should help the strength there. Also, like someone else said, work on holding your half seat right through to a stride or two after a fence. Gymnastics are great for this too, just come into the gymnastic into your half seat and hold it throughout, you'll feel how the horse actually helps you close and open your hip angle when you are just flowing with him.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mayaty02 View Post
    My first thought when watching your video is that I'd venture your core muscles are weak. You don't just come up early, you hollow out. Lots of core work, pilates especially should help the strength there. Also, like someone else said, work on holding your half seat right through to a stride or two after a fence. Gymnastics are great for this too, just come into the gymnastic into your half seat and hold it throughout, you'll feel how the horse actually helps you close and open your hip angle when you are just flowing with him.
    This^^^
    Weak core (abs/lower and upper back/chest) was the first thing that came to mind for me. Pilates/weights will help immensely, and if you do them religiously a few times a week, you'll notice a big difference in about 3 weeks.

    On the horse, transitions while staying in two point. Jumping small series of bounces with no hands, staying in 2 point trotting in and trying to keep your body still and letting horse jump up to you.



  11. #11
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    Mar. 26, 2010
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    Default

    You know, I really think it's my back that's the culprit. I'm a part-time professional belly dancer so that area is nice and strong but I do notice bad back soreness when I'm REALLY focusing on holding my shoulder away from my hand and holding myself up. I've got some lower back issues as well so that makes sense.

    Since I rode in the dark last night I tried lots of the holding in 2 point and trying transitions. The good part about Chance is he's up for anything so me doing transitions with no hands in 2 point is a dream come true for him!



  12. #12
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    Sep. 12, 2006
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    Virginia
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    Default

    yeah if you're a belly dancer, probably your core is ok but your back is weak, which is odd because your core muscles support your low back...you're definitely doing something wonky there in the low back though.



  13. #13
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    Mar. 26, 2010
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    Default

    I actually have chronic lower back pain from a back block for an operation that went bad and a hip higher than the other. I guess I didn't realize how badly it could affect my riding. Back to the chiropractor too I guess!



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