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  1. #1
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    Default Spinoff- what should an OTTB be capable of?

    Just wondering- will be interested to hear the responses.



  2. #2
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    Feb. 4, 2004
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    I have always heard people say prelim is attainable for any sound OTTB.

    IME that is probably true physically (I've never owned one that lacked scope for that) but I think mentally there is greater variety. I've owned several that just weren't into jumping or x-c enough to go that far, despite having the ability.



  3. #3
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    Oct. 16, 2000
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    Are you asking about what their potential should be?? Or what should they be doing when getting them from the track?

    Seb
    \"The Truth is contagious, and I haven't washed my hands in days...!\"-- Stephen Colbert
    www.janearmour.com



  4. #4
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    Aug. 28, 2007
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    Default

    well, if you ask me, they do everything better than a warmblood with more brains, more precision, and the artistic drive to be awesome .
    Eventing was popularized "back in the day" using thoroughbreds...Paul Belasik has trained 3 thoroughbreds to haute ecole and airs above the ground. There really is no limit
    My OTTB blows me away every time I ride him.... but we've had 11 years to work on it together.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beam Me Up View Post
    I have always heard people say prelim is attainable for any sound OTTB.

    IME that is probably true physically (I've never owned one that lacked scope for that) but I think mentally there is greater variety. I've owned several that just weren't into jumping or x-c enough to go that far, despite having the ability.
    I'm going to answer assuming the question refers to *sound* OTTBs. Obviously injuries will affect things!


    I would expect most to be able to go prelim or higher physically, too. They are bred to be supreme athletes, so even if sprinters who are a little downhill they probably can physically. Mentally, I think training is a limit for many (or lower) but would guess the mental average is between training and prelim. However, if all OTTBs were purchased by those who love and appreciate them, rather than those looking for an inexpensive horse who don't know what they're getting themselves into, I think it would tip toward prelim+ more heavily.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  6. #6
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    Default

    Thanks for the replies so far. I'm talking a sound OTTB with appropriate training.



  7. #7
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    Courageous Comet made it to the Olympics......
    "My doctrine is this, that if we see cruelty or wrong that we have the power to stop, and do nothing, we make ourselves sharers in the guilt.”
    ― Anna Sewell



  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by up-at-5 View Post
    Courageous Comet made it to the Olympics......
    So did Nirvana, and no doubt many others that don't come to my mind this early in the day!

    My answer might be a little different from others. I'm talking about a sound OTTB whose brain can be reached (once in a while I've come across one that was just soooo scrambled it was a life's work to get them to trust you).

    Once this horse trusts you, it will try it's heart out for you, whatever you ask. It may become frazzled because it doesn't understand the question, and it may anticipate and get excited, but I've never had one shut down on me. Every one of my OTTBs has been like the kid who wants to do so well in school that they may over try. But that's OK with me: I can control how much I ask and how I ask it. And I always try to find a way for them to succeed, even if I have to change the question.

    So, what can they achieve? Limited only by the rider and the skill of the trainer, Prelim easily, probably higher. Might not score the best in dressage, but as I said, will always try for you.
    They don't call me frugal for nothing.
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.



  9. #9
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    Default

    A couple of yeears ago, Phyllis Dawson gave a talk about buying horses off the track.

    I may have the numbers wrong, but this is the gist of it.

    Over several years, she bought 200 horses off teh trak, all sound a nd ones that she thought, from what she saw, had the potential to be serious eventers.

    About helf of them ended up in non-competition homes.

    About a quarter ended up in disciplines other than Eventing (dressage, hunters, jumpers, etc.).

    About a quarter ended up in Eventing homes. Of those, most of them ended up in Novice-Training careers. About a dozen ended up doing Prelim, and "count them on the fingers of one hand" went above Prelim.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  10. #10
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    Aug. 20, 2006
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    Pa-eternally laboring in the infinite creative and sustentative work of the universe
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    These were the top Olympic eventing horses of 2008
    http://www.theequinest.com/olympic-e...-horse-breeds/

    and these were the US Olympic Team horses of 2008
    http://www.theequinest.com/eventing-...2008-olympics/
    >Courageous Comet is here (3tbs out of 4)
    IN GOD WE TRUST
    OTTB's ready to show/event/jumpers. Track ponies for perfect trail partners.
    http://www.horseville.com/php/search...=1&ssid=057680



  11. #11
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    Jan. 12, 2011
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    1. horse has to be sound and have no conformation issues that are serious (like we have a pole legged giant who makes for a nice teenager BN horse but that is it for him).

    2. As Wofford said -HEART - XC is a big deal for courage. When I was at my last rec event, I saw some horses stopping at BN and N stadium jumps and I was thinking - why bother with a horse like that? That would totally end my love for the sport- being on a dishonest horse. But what makes a horse dishonest - well obviously bad training and bad riding.. poor conditioning.... But also, some horses just dont like it so much. And when going over a XC jump - you dont want a horse that is looking for a way out. You want the horse to make up for anything you screw up! LOL And a good TB will do that!

    3. I personally like a TB who can mentally focus so I do look for a horse that can pay attention. That can be trained, conditioned and sometimes - I have known 4-5-6 year old TBs people considered 'stupid' who were completely different horses when they turned 9-10. But if I am shopping for a good prospect - I look for a horse that has some sense.

    1. soundness
    2. HEART
    3. mental focus

    ABILITY wise - I think unless there is a conformational issue - most can go to prelim if they have the above 3 things.



  12. #12
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    Oct. 9, 2009
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    marshall VA
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    I'm a little tired of the treatment of the OTTB as though it were some specific breed. I've had many horses off the track and they were all as different as chalk from cheese in every aspect- temperament, physical talent and previous training. Some were quiet as dogs, some hot; some genial klutzes, some ferraris; some well broke at the farm, some who had obviously never actually done any what you might call steering. I find it usually pays to look at the individual horse and not rely on breed generalities.



  13. #13
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    Jul. 14, 2010
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    North AL
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lesbrill54 View Post
    I'm a little tired of the treatment of the OTTB as though it were some specific breed. I've had many horses off the track and they were all as different as chalk from cheese in every aspect- temperament, physical talent and previous training. Some were quiet as dogs, some hot; some genial klutzes, some ferraris; some well broke at the farm, some who had obviously never actually done any what you might call steering. I find it usually pays to look at the individual horse and not rely on breed generalities.
    Agree, and would like to add that you would have to take into account the rider/trainer as well. I'm sure you have all had those experiences where a different rider had a different/better relationship with a horse and was able to do more with it. I've even seen a less experienced rider go further than an advanced rider with an OTTB, just because they had a different connection. So it really depends on SO many factors.



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