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  1. #1
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    Default plaits for jumper?

    My mare's mane is very ugly and difficult to deal with. It's thin, but I've yet to figure out how to pull/trim it so that it doesn't look even worse than it did to start with. I've even tried the teasing/razor blade trick that always worked on horses with difficult manes before (but makes them a nightmare to braid ) Basically, she's not clinic or A-show ring presentable without plaits. I used to braid hunter manes all the time for A-circuit shows when I was a groom/working student, but I've never plaited a mane before. I googled it and the few websites with pictures I've found are not extremely helpful, so I was wondering if anyone has any links that might help me learn what to do different when plaiting vs. braiding for the hunter ring?



  2. #2
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  3. #3
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    Jun. 4, 2007
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    Default

    Thanks Touchstone! I asked this same question a few months back ... the video you posted is super helpful!



  4. #4
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    Default

    Really good videos! And I have checked the tail one too! Thanks for posting!



  5. #5
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    Jul. 1, 2005
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    Default

    OKay, that video makes it seem soooo simple! i will be trying this soon to see if i can manage to do it on my own! thanks for the video link!
    "If you are nervous you arent focused-if you are focused, there is no room for nerves!"




  6. #6
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    Jul. 19, 2007
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    Michigan
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    Default

    "You will need plaiting bands the same color as the mane...."

    Uh, that's a funny horse that needs the bands in the upper left on that video shot (the pink and purple ones!)



  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bhrunner06 View Post
    OKay, that video makes it seem soooo simple! i will be trying this soon to see if i can manage to do it on my own! thanks for the video link!
    It is pretty easy. I was able to teach myself from the video. The hardest thing is retraining yourself to make bigger braids.



  8. #8
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    Jun. 20, 2000
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    Is there a fine point of difference between plaiting and braiding that I'm not aware of? I've always thought of them as interchangeable, albeit the Brits always refer to putting a mane up as plaiting, and never put in enough braids (or 'plaits') to make the horse's neck look better IMO. They've always plaited to get the mane out of the way, and their method of tying up the braid results in knobs which do not improve the look of the horse's topline.

    I think the horse in the video looks only marginally better braided, and if it was the same horse at the start of the video, the long mane was originally on the off side. In America, hunters are always braided on the off side, and only jumpers who are only rarely braided don't bother to retrain the mane to the offside.

    OP if you used to braid AA hunters, you can certainly regain your skills to make your mare's mane presentable, without resorting to making popcorn balls on your mare's neck. Instead of using a razor and teasing, try a GOOD pair of thinning shears purchased from a dog catalog (don't pay less than $30). If her mane is just uneven, use the thinning shears at the bottom of the mane. If it is too thick, use the thinning shears on the underside of the mane, on the off side of the crest, so that when you pull the section across the crest the braid it covers the area you've thinned.

    Good luck!
    ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
    Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kryswyn View Post
    Is there a fine point of difference between plaiting and braiding that I'm not aware of? I've always thought of them as interchangeable, albeit the Brits always refer to putting a mane up as plaiting, and never put in enough braids (or 'plaits') to make the horse's neck look better IMO. They've always plaited to get the mane out of the way, and their method of tying up the braid results in knobs which do not improve the look of the horse's topline.
    There is a difference, in style. Sounds like you don't like the look of plaits, and wouldn't do them, which is fine. But I think they are a nice look on some horses in the jumper ring, and they seem to be becoming somewhat trendy--have seen that some of the BNT barns are sending all their jumpers to the ring with them. They're also comparatively quick and easy to insert, which means that I often plait my horse for the jumpers, while I'd never bother to put in hunter braids.

    But if they're not to your taste, don't do them. There are certainly a few GP riders who come to the ring in hunter braids. And plenty of jumpers at all levels who don't braid at all.



  10. #10
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kryswyn View Post
    If it is too thick, use the thinning shears on the underside of the mane, on the off side of the crest, so that when you pull the section across the crest the braid it covers the area you've thinned.
    I've wanted to do this to my TB and his thick mane, but I worry that when it starts to grow out, it will spike up and push the main over to the wrong side. We used to do that to our show Morgans with thick manes, only instead of thinning we'd half-roach with clippers. We'd have to keep on top of it, practically weekly, or else it would look like a mess with the roached part starting to grow and stick up out of the longer/flopped over mane. Is the thinning a lot "kinder" in the growing out phase than straight roaching?



  11. #11
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    Jul. 10, 2008
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    Great video!

    I have seen some horses in the jumpers with the neck braided in big "plaits" with the forelock left loose.. I think it's a neat look, but I've read somewhere that the loose forelock denotes a stallion. Is that true?
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

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  12. #12
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    I agree with Kryswyn, the plaiting done in the UK style does nothing to improve the appearance of the horse and show off its head and neck, it looks messy and lumpy. At one time it was not so unusual to show jumpers with what we now call "hunter braids" - I can remember the USET horses were often beautifully turned out that way.



  13. #13
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    You do have to stay on top of the section you thin, but unlike roaching you're not 'clearcutting' the crest just thinning it, so the near side will be thick and the off side, thinner. It shouldn't ever get thick enough to alter the lay of the mane.
    ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
    Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

    "Life is merrier with a terrier!"



  14. #14
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    Aug. 1, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by caradino View Post
    I've read somewhere that the loose forelock denotes a stallion. Is that true?
    That is probably dated information. My barn sends every horse to the ring braided, hunter or jumper, although the guys do the jumper braids instead of a "real" braider. They only braid the forelock of two horses, one (gelding) is a headshaker and the other (stallion) has a forelock so big they braid it even to flat . My jumper, who is a stallion, has a forelock so puny you can't tell if it's braided or not.
    When the boogeyman goes to sleep, he checks the closet for George Morris. -mpsbarnmanager



  15. #15
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    The video said you want an odd number of plaits in the mane and an even number in the forelock?? I have never seen more then one forelock braid in my life, last time I check one is an odd number.



  16. #16
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    Aug. 24, 2006
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    Though others do it now because it looks good, plaiting the mane but leaving the forelock did apparently originally mean 'stallion'. I know my studs loved to look good at the show and I always let their forelocks fly!

    I did the plaits on this guy on the homepage... I tend to do a one-elastic plait and somehow it holds! Saves on rubber bands too.
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