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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    295

    Default Abscess help anyone?

    I bought Tommy July 28, 2010. At the time he had an abscess that had come out of the top of the left front hoof just below coronary band. The abscess site closed and appeared to be healed up, so I had a few weeks of riding. His farrier appointment was in September, and when his shoes were pulled the farrier discovered that his new shoes (right before I bought him) had been put right overtop of the abscess. There is an actual HOLE in in his hoof. A hole. It's two thumbs wide and a pinky finger deep. Here is a picture:

    http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/...S/DSCN0166.jpg

    Since September I have soaked, medicated, and wrapped his foot. The abscess will heal a bit, but continually re-abscesses. I have had the vet look at it in July, December, and January. We have done 2 rounds of antibiotics. We have done x-rays and there is no foreign material in the hoof showing up. I have EasyBoot Rx's that he wears in the front. He has been confined to a stall to try and keep the moisture out (thrush was a problem once I started booting). I have a barefoot/natural farrier, who is doing a great job working with Tommy now. While she's been trimming my other horse for a year, I'd been using a draft farrier for Tommy and so yesterday was her 2nd time with him. These are the photos from his second trim last night:

    http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/...S/DSCN0167.jpg

    http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/...S/DSCN0168.jpg

    http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/...S/DSCN0170.jpg

    http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/...S/DSCN0171.jpg

    Right now the hole is still open to soft tissue and it is still infected. The outside of the hoof is hollow if you thunk it because the hole is so large. I am medicating and packing the hole, then vet wrapping, and putting the boots on. He's still confined to a stall or the indoor arena.

    I'm posting because I've never had an abscess last for 6 months, and I've definately never had a hole in the hoof like this. I'm hoping that someone else here has had this problem, and can offer some wonder cure. I've done Epsom salts, Clean Trax, Coppertox, Wonder Dust, NO Thrush, Ichthymnal, Iodine, and something I forget that is green and has the epsom salts in it.

    While I heart my vet and farrier, I'm wondering if anyone has any suggestions? Or maybe I'm just being a Nervous Nellie and holes like this are totally commonplace and I'm making a big deal out of nothing?
    Only dead fish go with the flow.

    http://tommybluefoot.blogspot.com/



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2007
    Posts
    644

    Default

    try the product called Tomorrow, you should be able to get it at TSC. It's main use is for cow mastitis, but is an antibiotic as well. You can squirt it into hole and pack it like you have done with the other products you have mentioned.You should have some kind of indication if the infection is clearing up within a week...



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Has this foot been perfused? I would think this horse needs a resection and a medicine plate as well as possible perfusions. It is possible this is a defect in the foot that was not an abcess in the first place. Regardless, I'd be heading to a large clinic or vet school with to get a second opinion and course of treatment immediately. Best of luck,
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Posts
    1,423

    Default

    If I were you I would post exactly what you have posted here on the Farriers website. lots of farriers' advice there and good luck - looks very nasty http://horseshoes.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=16



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,636

    Default

    White Lightning!! Trust me, for abscesses, thrush, White Line Disease, etc., this stuff is your best friend.

    Keratex also makes a medicated "putty" to put into abscess holes. I've never used it, but it looks promising and Keratex makes some great products.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 23, 2002
    Location
    Prospect, ME
    Posts
    4,565

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    Has this foot been perfused? I would think this horse needs a resection and a medicine plate as well as possible perfusions. It is possible this is a defect in the foot that was not an abcess in the first place. Regardless, I'd be heading to a large clinic or vet school with to get a second opinion and course of treatment immediately. Best of luck,


    This.


    Good luck!
    -Jessica



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2008
    Posts
    1,698

    Default

    I could be WAY wrong and I hope I am, but have you looked into Canker?
    Here's a thread and pics.

    Again, could be totally out in left field. Hope I am.
    http://www.horseshoes.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2899

    NJR
    Your beliefs don't make you a better person, your behaviour does.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,035

    Default

    Keratex hoof putty may be good for this situation. It's medicated and will stay put to where you only have to change it out when necessary. I'd also have the horse on a hoof supplement to speed growth to get it grown out. I'd have a good amount of zinc and copper in with it, hoof supplement, and MSM just to help with growth and inflammation. If you're close to a large clinic or vet school though I'd definitely recommend that first. Good luck to you.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    295

    Default

    Thank you for all of the suggestions. I will stop by TSC tomorrow and pick up some Tomorrow. I will also check out the other links that everyone's provided.

    His hoof has not been perfused or resectioned. He'd been reshod in July right before I purchased him, and with our first farrier appointment in Sept. we found the abscess/hole under the shoe and left him barefoot. I had a really difficult time finding a farrier willing to do a draft horse. The farrier I use for Weapon graciously capitulated to my whining and said she'd trim Tommy too. This was her second trim with him.

    Someone else suggested that his diet was partly to blame and that he may have insulin problems. He gets a half scoop of straight oats 2x a day, plus hay. He was on a Biotin supplement, but is not any longer. I tried Farrier's Choice, but he refused to eat his grain with it in there.

    These were taken the same day. His hooves are very odd, and have been since I purchased him. They have many little wavy lines on them all around. It's almost like running your hand down a washboard, only they are much closer together. He also has a ball type lump on the inside of this hoof. You can see a bit of the lump above and to the left of the reddish area in the head-on shot.

    http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/...S/DSCN0170.jpg

    You can see the original abscess site on the side-view photo. It's at the very back corner at the top and is partially covered by hair and it's wavy.

    http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/...S/DSCN0171.jpg

    I also added in photos of Tommy's hooves/legs in August. You can see the wavy lines really well in this one.

    http://i1140.photobucket.com/albums/...S/IMG_3883.jpg
    Only dead fish go with the flow.

    http://tommybluefoot.blogspot.com/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2007
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,035

    Default

    The wavy lines look indicative of laminitic attacks that have been going on for a long time. And get him off those oats! Not good at all for a possible metabolic horse. There are tons of hoof supps out there he may find tasty. Smarthoof is super cheap and I have yet to have a horse turn their nose up at it. If he were mine I'd get him on soaked beet pulp without molasses, a multivitamin and a hoof supplement. How much grass does he have access to? Something is happening in those hooves and I'm betting he's got metabolic problems so the grass is going to need to be limited or exercise upped. Something's gotta give.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2009
    Posts
    135

    Default

    Agree with the metabolic comment.

    My gelding had a ton of abscesses when he had shoes; pulled the shoes and he had crappy feet. It took maybe a year for them to fully adjust but, knock on wood, no more abscesses in years.

    Look up low grade laminitis. No more sugar for this horse, and that includes oats! (Just made a blog post about NSCs and feed, and how it can affect feet... PM if you want the link! It's not super scientific, just KISS information. ) I would also continue to soak his feet with something mild; his frogs don't look all that healthy yet. (Having a case of thrush with my own gelding at the moment due to this wet northeast weather... I'm scrubbing with Dawn and then soaking with diluted Lysol. Simple, easy, cheap, and his heels already feel better.)

    But, most important--get him out of the stall! The hoof is a pump, and it only pumps blood efficiently when he's moving. If you want it to heal faster and the foot to be more healthy, you've got to get him moving. He's probably not weighting his heels properly either, so i would suspect that's holding up on healing the hole, as well.

    Good luck, keep us posted!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2008
    Posts
    1,833

    Smile

    Wow. I am glad to see you are getting what appears to be decent trimming now. That is a hoof in very poor shape. It has evidence of both mechanical (trimming) and metabolic (diet related) problems. The yellow in the walls OS from inflammation. The red is bruising from internal bleeding from a combination of inflammation and poor hoof form stressing and tearing blood vessels. So are the rings.

    I agree with putting him on a low starch diet which will get the inflammation down and improve the horn quality w/o the need for a supplement.

    The sole has been heavily overgrown for a long time. All that excess sole has been causing long term pressure on the corium causing the abscess and preventing it from healing. The sole needs to be cleaned up there so the pressure on the blood vessels inside is released and can have a chance to heal. Still, there will be necrotic tissue that will continue to abscess out most likely for some months.

    The toes are being addressed but this should not preclude



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2008
    Posts
    1,833

    Default

    attention to the sole, or lowering the heels. Heels often look this way on draft horses, they seem deceptively low due to the broad shape of the hoof but the high heel is causing that bruising (apparent on a white foot) and should be lowered.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    While I agree with much of the trimming advice given here...

    I would like to stress to the OP that an open hole in a foot with exposed corium is NOT something to be casually messing around with. White Lightening, diet changes, trim changes.... All things that may take a role in affecting this foot HOWEVER what you have is way, way, way out of the norm, and is not simply an abcess... And needs to be evaluated and addressed correctly by someone with more knowledge than whoever is treating it now.

    At this point.. You are long past hoof supplements, exercise issues, trim issues, abcess issues... And into another level of mess.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    11,512

    Exclamation

    Those wavy lines are the result of continuous low grade laminitis. He needs to go on a low starch , grass hay diet.

    A chronic abscess like that can be from something as common as white line disease, being common doesn't make it any the less frustrating. Resection is called for. All the old affected hoof must be removed, and the foot kept dry. However an accurate Dx is important.

    None of the recent photos,show enough of his pasterns, so that the pastern-hoof wall axis is discernible. He does look though as though his toes are a little long, as well as being dished.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    295

    Default

    Only dead fish go with the flow.

    http://tommybluefoot.blogspot.com/



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2007
    Location
    too far south
    Posts
    506

    Default

    None of that stuff is going to help until you get the hooves right.
    "Humans will never devise an invention more beautiful, more simple,
    or more direct than does Nature." ~Leonardo da Vinci



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2008
    Posts
    1,833

    Default

    I don't think the corium is exposed, I think it is gone in that spot. I think it died off as a result of the pressure from excess hoof horn cutting off the circulation long term and the body is trying to get rid of the necrotic tissue by abscessing it out. Once circulation is restored (by trimming away the excess sole/bar) the corium can start to regenerate and new sole will start to grow almost immediately, covering it. Unfortunately that will also probably stimulate more necrotic tissue to abscess out, but it does have to before the horse can be sound.

    You may also want to do some metabolic testing, the long wavy hair looks like it could belong to a metabolic horse.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    295

    Default

    I started a blog for Tommy. I've got a couple of more updates to post, but I'm trying to keep it in order so I'm not skipping all around.

    http://tommybluefoot.blogspot.com

    Tommy's first day of outdoor turnout. He started out well, then decided to indulge in a bit of mini donkey chasing. Now he's back in solitary! The good news is he looks sound!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSrhTvXMiRo
    Only dead fish go with the flow.

    http://tommybluefoot.blogspot.com/



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2001
    Location
    Dry Ridge, KY USA
    Posts
    3,150

    Default

    JenLS,

    I just read your blog. You did the right thing by taking Tommy to an Equine hospital. I admire you for going that route.

    It is not that your regular Vet is not good, it is that he is not equipped with the tools to see everything that is going on inside of Tommy's leg/hoof.

    I am sorry to see all of the problems that Tommy has inside of his hoof and legs. He looks like such a sweet guy.

    Jingles and prayers from KY, for a good outcome for Tommy.
    When in Doubt, let your horse do the Thinking!



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