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  1. #121
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    Oct. 14, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by RubyTuesday View Post
    See, I miss a lot when out in real life...I had no idea brown or black tack caused such controversy as some of those others! Sure, I know some consider one or the other "proper" for certain disciplines, but brown/black tack vs. Parelli or PETA?! Sheesh!

    So, I just bought a saddle that was special ordered custom from the UK in two-tone...it is brown AND black, depending on which parts of the saddle are being viewed. Should I be looking out to be flamed by all sides now?
    I threw in some for giggles.



  2. #122
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by RubyTuesday View Post
    See, I miss a lot when out in real life...I had no idea brown or black tack caused such controversy as some of those others! Sure, I know some consider one or the other "proper" for certain disciplines, but brown/black tack vs. Parelli or PETA?! Sheesh!

    So, I just bought a saddle that was special ordered custom from the UK in two-tone...it is brown AND black, depending on which parts of the saddle are being viewed. Should I be looking out to be flamed by all sides now?
    Paints are your friend, use whichever fits the situation.



  3. #123
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2003
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    Cresco, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post
    I was reading another thread which is contradictory to everything else I've read on this BB

    People on this BB say that if you've hit rock bottom, can't find a home for your horse, slaughter is a cruel option. Better to have the horse euthanised at home then send it off.

    Now i'm reading that Euthanasia is never an option. No matter how old, lame, or sick the horse is. No matter how many options the owners have explored it isn't an option. You simply aren't trying hard enough, you are a BAD person.

    What gives? To me it sounds like you're dammed if you do dammed if you don't.

    Unless the opinionated are paying the bills they have no say. Remember "It's none of my business what others think of me." Life is simpler if you can live by that axiom.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #124
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    Aug. 24, 2003
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    Cresco, PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by quietann View Post
    Also -- this is an old thread. I've been on the COTH forums since 2007, and it's very interesting to me how the attitude toward euthanizing a horse that is not in a dire state has changed. People seem much more open to it and less likely to jump all over someone with a "problem" horse they want to euthanize. ("Problem" horse can be defined a lot of different ways. But in general it's a horse that would likely meet a bad end if it was sold, given that homes for companion horses are becoming less available.)
    I would venture a guess that the poor economy and glut of horses has caused people to rethink their positions. Reality bites.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #125
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    Oct. 7, 2010
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    So...I've been thinking...

    There is a place not too far from here that has captive lions. Like, 'Lion King', roaring, lions.
    Ten years ago and more, we used to take stillborn calves, broken-legged cows, and such non-drugged recently dead animals to them rather than paying the rendering outfit to pick them up and haul them away.

    The rendering plant no longer exists.

    And nowadays, you have to pay $100 to take your horse to the lions (horse recently dead, or shot humanely). The policy is still is no drugs on board.

    It occurred to me that this would economically encourage the keeping of lions.
    I don't think I'm particularly 'for' encouraging the breeding, selling, and keeping-captive of lions.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #126
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    Oct. 25, 2012
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    Interesting. "No drugs on board" for lion chow, but for human consumption it's no rules football. Hmmmm . . . .


    4 members found this post helpful.

  7. #127
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    Jun. 19, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by sevensprings View Post
    I would venture a guess that the poor economy and glut of horses has caused people to rethink their positions. Reality bites.
    So does a broken left ankle with 9 pins and a plate in it that also insults by happening on April Fools Day,.

    A condo with no pets looks mighty appealing...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #128
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    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Quote Originally Posted by chisamba View Post
    I was at a barn where the owner refused to put her horses to sleep. SHe would claim the " told her they wanted to die their way" and her old horses would suffer for days, with labored breathing, in agony, til they died. I would maybe have believed her if she spent any time with them at all, but she did not, she just locked them in a stall and abandoned them.

    It was about money though, not about natural death, becaues if some one else offered to pay for their euthanasia, she was fine with that.

    i can say without equivocation, that letting a horse die naturally is harsh. They sometimes take a long time to get there, dehydrate, cannot get up, starve, struggle with breathing and water on the lungs from not being able to get up, and there is nothing kind about it.

    When i look at pictures of animals in aweful condition, every rib showing, every attempt at survival a struggle, I think that even a bad death, at a slaughter house, is perhaps better than that, so i am not sure about the slaughter option, however euthanasia at home, for horses in pain of failing health, i am a strong supporter.

    I would even include horses that have very strong fear/ temperament issues in that, perhaps it woud be a kindness to put even a healthish horse, with severe behavoral problems, that cannot be solved, to sleep.

    I am thinking of a horse that paced and stall ran constantly, if he was in, or out, he was skin and bones and the poor owner did every single thing she could think of to treat his condition.

    anyway, i am for putting an animal to sleep, and i agree that each case is individual and every situation is different.

    I had a friend who was dying of cancer and lived in arizona, near the mexican border. When she was about to go into hospice, she had the vet come and put all of her older horses to sleep. She only had two young horses, and these she sent to me, but all the older guys, she PTS. Why? it was too close to the slaughter houses, and they were too old to be anything more than lawn ornaments, and she just did not know that she could trust anyone to be sure that they were safe for the rest of their lives.

    right or wrong? i dont know, but it was her choice, and her horses were happy right up until the end.
    Interesting.



  9. #129
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    Sep. 11, 2008
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    Snohomish, WA
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    Sorry you had to do that. It's such a tough decision. What's the saying about walking a mile in your shoes??
    Those surgeries can be very very expensive with no real guarantee it's going to work anyway.

    Quote Originally Posted by RubyTuesday View Post
    Amen to that! I had a horse that, while I didn't *have* to euthanize her, I did. Very long story compressed into a cube, she was needing surgery or she would die. I opted to euthanize. I had a lot of people jump in and say "NO!"...of course, none of these people were able or willing to pay for any cost outside of what the insurance would pick up, the cost of a rehab facility, dealing with a horse who was a bad head case when it came to pain, etc, etc. I got all the arguments of why I shouldn't do it, but no one offering to jump in and do all the work, provide all the money, or otherwise to make it NOT happen, just telling me what *I* should do. So I sucked it up and was there to be sure she was humanely euthanized...a seven year project gone with the stick of two needles. You just have to do the best you can, pay your money and take your chances. Now that it's done, a few people have reversed their position and said it's the right thing, so there you go. Others have come out the the woodwork and said it was the ONLY thing to do. I like to revert to this cute little saying: "I can only please one person per day. Today is not your day. Tomorrow doesn't look good either."



  10. #130
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    Feb. 10, 2006
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    I have no problem with euthanizing a horse that is too old, too sick, too dangerous or just simply too excess with no place to go. I do think that if a horse is useful a good faith effort to find a home is commendable but in the end horses are property and as long as they are not abused or neglected others really have no say. See the key there is abused, the whole slaughter "thing" is rife with abuse from start to finish. So I do not find that acceptable. Now if you had a mobile butcher come to your house and humanely shoot and butcher out your horse, I could care less if you ate it. Or fed it to your hounds or lions.
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #131
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    Somewhere back there a post stated that in the US microchips are required? No, microchips are NOT required and as someone ELSE posted, they check for them AFTER death, to remove them, not to look and see if your horse was stolen or not meant for slaughter.
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  12. #132
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    Feb. 15, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by JGHIRETIRE View Post
    Sorry you had to do that. It's such a tough decision. What's the saying about walking a mile in your shoes??
    Those surgeries can be very very expensive with no real guarantee it's going to work anyway.
    Exactly. After this happened, someone I know whose sister has a breeding farm told me that one year, for a reason they have never been able to determine, they had six yearling-or-under youngsters all colic and have to go to surgery. None made it out alive. It had never happened before or since. But they spent a ton and had no horses come back home to show for it. I have yet to personally know someone who had a horse go for colic surgery of any persuasion and have their horse be able to come back to the full capability of what it was before it colicked. Others' mileage may vary, but all I have heard have been horror stories and repeat offenders that wound up back in the hospital again. Not to mention, again, this horse would have been VERY difficult if not just plain dangerous to convalesce. She was trying to rip or rub her IV out while sedated in the hospital.



  13. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by summerhorse View Post
    Somewhere back there a post stated that in the US microchips are required? No, microchips are NOT required and as someone ELSE posted, they check for them AFTER death, to remove them, not to look and see if your horse was stolen or not meant for slaughter.
    Too true. There has been a push for them to check for microchips but I have never heard that that was successfully implemented.



  14. #134
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    Apr. 9, 2012
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    You will never, ever, convince me that slaughter is an option for any of my horses. Ever. How on earth can a horse owner intentionally sell a horse to slaughter, knowing that horse will spend his last moments following other horses down a chute, watching them die, and knowing he's next?

    I couldn't do it myself. If a horse is in pain or old and there's no way I can afford a good home for my animal, euthanasia is the only option. I pray I will never have to make that decision and I will do my utmost to ensure I don't.

    Whether slaughter itself should occur in the US or not is a different issue, and something that I am very conflicted about.
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



  15. #135
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    Jul. 19, 2007
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    Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
    Interesting. "No drugs on board" for lion chow, but for human consumption it's no rules football. Hmmmm . . . .
    They mean no chemical euthing. It would poison the lions. Chemically-euthed carcasses are basically nothing but toxic waste. You can't feed carnivores meat unless it dropped dead on its own or died from mechanical means. Most zoo stuff is purchased slaughtered meat that definitely ISN'T 100% drug-free organic. Just not loaded with lethal doses of barbiturates.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #136
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    Aug. 7, 2005
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    Georgia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Somermist View Post
    Who says that euthanasia is never an option? IMO sometimes that is the only option.
    And sometimes it isn't the only option but it's the best option.
    You know why cowboys don't like Appaloosas?" - Answer: Because to train a horse, you have to be smarter than it is.



  17. #137
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    Mar. 13, 2006
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    Sno County
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    Quote Originally Posted by chai View Post
    I once asked my neighbor who ran a nightmare of a livery barn how on Earth she could have shipped her Mother's elderly TB mare to slaughter auction after that horse carted countless kids on her back, was like a member of the family and made her a lot of money. Her response made my blood run cold, "It's the ultimate recycling."

    Some people do not have any emotional attachment or compassion for their animals. I would choose euthanasia at home any day over sending my horse to auction. I just pray I never have to make that decision and I would never pass judgement on someone who chose to euthanize their horse if they had exhausted all options rather than risk sending their horse to the kill pen.
    Or like a guy in our horse club said when we had our old horse with advanced arthritis put down, "next time send them to the holding yard in Ferndale, at least you'll get a few bucks for him!" I know that's what he did with his old horse that he had for years who carted his ass all over creation willingly. Can no longer do the job? It's off to slaughter for you. For this reason I refuse to have anything to do with him. What a shithead.
    Yogurt - If you're so cultured, how come I never see you at the opera? Steven Colbert


    4 members found this post helpful.

  18. #138
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    Oct. 25, 2012
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    I call it "failure to evolve." These types of folks think it's still 1947 when that was "the done thing." They rationalize it through lack of empathy with the horse.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #139
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Eboshi View Post
    I call it "failure to evolve." These types of folks think it's still 1947 when that was "the done thing." They rationalize it through lack of empathy with the horse.
    You do realize you are talking about most of the world today?

    I would say, it is SOME animal rights extremists in the USA that are the type of folks that are a bit "tatched" to be first, wanting to tell everyone else how to do what they do and second, be so blind as to, having a perfectly fine process to use the natural, renewable resource SOME horses are after death, horses that are going to be killed one way or another, use SOME of those one more time, now out of the clear blue sky decide to WASTE it all and ban horse slaughter.

    If you object to the money paid, you can donate yours to some rescue of your choice and feel oh so good about that too.

    I would not know who here is the one with the faulty logic, but it is not those that accept slaughter for what it is.

    Now, maybe those people in these stories are not the nicest "folks" around, but I have to say, those that are so low to call them names, well, you be the judge about how they come across in the "nice" department.
    There are bad people every place, even amongst those that climb on a box to claim the high moral ground and judge others.



  20. #140
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    Jun. 19, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by ako View Post
    You will never, ever, convince me that slaughter is an option for any of my horses. Ever. How on earth can a horse owner intentionally sell a horse to slaughter, knowing that horse will spend his last moments following other horses down a chute, watching them die, and knowing he's next?

    I couldn't do it myself. If a horse is in pain or old and there's no way I can afford a good home for my animal, euthanasia is the only option. I pray I will never have to make that decision and I will do my utmost to ensure I don't.

    Whether slaughter itself should occur in the US or not is a different issue, and something that I am very conflicted about.
    Watching them..knowing he is NEXT? Do you actually believe that?

    Maybe you should focus on PI..3.14..teach your horse mathematics. IF he can use his brain to interpret numbers and equate it to he knows he is next..you will make millions.

    Horses can NOT process information in a human manner. Period

    ASK your VET...


    3 members found this post helpful.

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