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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2011
    Posts
    292

    Smile Our 1st lesson together

    Today I was able to take the horse I am leasing to a lesson at another barn. This was our first time riding at another barn. He was so good, even with the crazy wind. Here is a video I put together (My first edited video) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eiAAwv28nwY

    I have had this horse for 2 months now and he is coming along nicely. He had a little bucking issues at first. We mainly do alot of flat work with some jumping. He is so pokey, I am always pushing him forward.

    Critic is welcome.I would like to hear more of your thoughts on him. I want to show him in both hunter and pleasure this summer, what do you think? I know my equ is not great and I was not really working on that but if you have any advice on my riding that would help his way of going thats great.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2001
    Location
    Glenns, VA USA
    Posts
    1,979

    Default

    Congrats on the "new to you" horse!!! He looks pleasant and honest.

    Just a few suggestions,

    Form is function, so improving your equitation so to speak, will only enhance your horse!

    - Don't post so high.
    - Keep a slight bend in your elbow, otherwise your arm gets stiff and ridge. This allows you to open and close your elbow as you post at the trot, so it doesn't go up and down with you.
    - For American forward seat riding, even at the walk, your shoulder isn't on the vertical, your hip angle is very open, just off vertical at walk, about 30 degrees off vertical at trot, etc.
    - Weight your heels, more work in 2pt, relax your knee.
    - Shorten your stirrups 1-2 holes for jumping, knee angle too open.
    - Keep your eyes in front of you when jumping.
    - At these little heights, once in jumping position, no need to make a huge effort with your upper body.

    Perfect practice makes perfect! Keep it up. Have a wonderful and fun time with him!
    www.brydellefarm.com ....developing riders, NOT passengers!
    Member of LNHorsemanshipT & Proud of It Clique
    "What gets me up every morning is realizing how much more there is still to learn." -GHM



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    7,514

    Default

    He's really cute. Just a few random thoughts. You tend to look in and down over the fence. Really focus on looking up and straight ahead. Also, during your work in two-point over the poles and over the fences, you aren't really using your hands. Over the poles, it's like you're standing in your stirrups with your hands floating above the crest. Bring your hips back and gets your hands down on his neck. Over the fences, you place your hands down right at the withers, instead of putting them a bit farther up his neck so he can use his head to jump.

    I think a stronger lower leg will help with your hand placement, as well as help stabilize your upper body. I didn't notice it until the canter, but you can see as you canter away from the vertical that your entire body moves as one, leg swings forward and back as upper body moves. Getting your lower leg stronger will allow you to separate the pieces of your body and use them more effectively.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2002
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    6,398

    Default

    I love you horse. He is adorable! Looks like a good honest guy!
    I love cats, I love every single cat....
    So anyway I am a cat lover
    And I love to run.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2011
    Posts
    292

    Default

    Thanks! He has a huge trot and I am still getting used to it. The woman teaching told me to look down at the fence/ pole coming up to it to focus on keeping him straight.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2009
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    673

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jay0087 View Post
    The woman teaching told me to look down at the fence/ pole coming up to it to focus on keeping him straight.


    Really? I've never heard that before. Normally, (atleast from what I've always seen/heard) one is instructed to look straight ahead, say at a wall or window. It keeps you upright so you don't slump over the fence or drop your horse infront of it.
    Tru : April 14, 1996 - March 14, 2011
    Thank you for everything boy.


    Better View.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
    Location
    CA
    Posts
    11,978

    Default

    Cute horse. A little sluggish. Once you figure out how to really get him moving, your job is going to be so much easier.

    I don't think that saddle is doing you any favors. It looks like it's pommel sits lower than the cantle which is pushing your forward and making it difficult to slow your body down, resulting in excess posting motion. It doesn't happen to be a Bates, does it?

    Over the jump, you lean, then pop back into the saddle. You've got to be strong in your hamstrings/hips and keep your butt out of the saddle until you land. Right now it's no big deal, but as you start jumping bigger, you are going to cause some hind end rails if you continue as you are right now. I also think the saddle has something to do with this. The sweet spot is not right for you at all and it makes it hard to stay centered and balanced.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2008
    Location
    The Great Northwest!
    Posts
    1,394

    Default

    Congrats!
    Foaling Around www.facebook.com/foalingaround
    Custom Equestrian Items and Bath Products



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2011
    Posts
    292

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by katie+tru View Post
    Really? I've never heard that before. Normally, (atleast from what I've always seen/heard) one is instructed to look straight ahead, say at a wall or window. It keeps you upright so you don't slump over the fence or drop your horse infront of it.
    Yeah me too. She said I know you have always been taught to look up and forward.

    Quote Originally Posted by RugBug View Post
    Cute horse. A little sluggish. Once you figure out how to really get him moving, your job is going to be so much easier.

    I don't think that saddle is doing you any favors. It looks like it's pommel sits lower than the cantle which is pushing your forward and making it difficult to slow your body down, resulting in excess posting motion. It doesn't happen to be a Bates, does it?

    Over the jump, you lean, then pop back into the saddle. You've got to be strong in your hamstrings/hips and keep your butt out of the saddle until you land. Right now it's no big deal, but as you start jumping bigger, you are going to cause some hind end rails if you continue as you are right now. I also think the saddle has something to do with this. The sweet spot is not right for you at all and it makes it hard to stay centered and balanced.
    He is so pokey but when he is in a bad mood he can move!! I have been riding with a dressage whip too just give a little tap.

    Its a dover circuit saddle. I had my old trainner look at my saddle on this horse and she said to put a riser in the back, The only riser at the barn was my friends tha had the front cut off. Do you think I should take that out or maybe use something smaller?

    The popping up started from my old horse, who kinda would throw me back and it just stuck after the many years of riding him.

    We are looking at getting a new saddle sometime in the next month. What do you suggest? I am sending my old dover saddle back cause some how the tree broke so Dover might give us something to put to a new saddle prob a dover circuit saddle. We will most likely only have 600 to 700 for a saddle.



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