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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 5, 2007
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,190

    Default Hunt Whip question.....

    I just found a wonderful older hunt whip (antler hook, silver collar, plaited leather shaft, closed keeper and finely braided leather thong. No info on the maker other than it's made in England) that's in really great condition and intact with the exception of the lash/popper/cracker at the end of the thong. Where does one buy the correct type of popper for a hunt whip?

    This is my first hunt whip, so I'm not well versed in them. What little I know comes from the research I've done online and observing our staff using them.

    Thanks!

    Disclaimer: I'm not looking to become a "wannabe staff" memeber, but have always wanted to carry a hunt whip just incase I need it for something....or to have one on hand incase a staff member needs one....I've also been told they are great to take out on the trails incase one runs into an errant and aggressive dog....



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 25, 2007
    Posts
    1,402

    Default

    Jo at Middleburg Tack Exchange can help you.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2006
    Location
    Richmond, VA
    Posts
    275

    Default

    Dover sells them. Look up 'whip cracker.' You can also google instructions on how to make your own out of baling twine, I think.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 30, 2002
    Location
    Looking up
    Posts
    6,422

    Default

    I have a question - while on the subject of hunt whips - even if you buy your own and carry it, is it proper etiquette if you are NOT a whip and simply a part of the field as a farily newbie hunts person? (As in hunting only three years). Should one wait for a suggestion before buying your own hunt whip? Or?
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2004
    Location
    No. VA
    Posts
    2,334

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by retreadeventer View Post
    I have a question - while on the subject of hunt whips - even if you buy your own and carry it, is it proper etiquette if you are NOT a whip and simply a part of the field as a farily newbie hunts person? (As in hunting only three years). Should one wait for a suggestion before buying your own hunt whip? Or?
    You should consider a hunt whip in the same category as a hunt helmet, a hunt coat, and your hunt boots -- ie: it is part of your attire. So the first time you put on a hunt coat, you can also carry your whip while hunting.

    You can use the antler horn to catch gates or help push them closed. You are allowed to drop the lash alongside your horse if you want to discourage a hound from getting too close, but you can't swing it at the hound. You can wiggle it gently back and forth as long as the lash remains next to your horse at all times. When the lash isn't in use, it must remain coiled in your hand so that it doesn't impede your horse or a hound running alongside.

    Cardinal rule: Don't use your whip on a hound, or another horse, or another rider no matter how much they might irritate you during the hunt.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 15, 2008
    Location
    Orlean, Va
    Posts
    2,060

    Default

    You can always ask your hunt secretary, MFH, or mentor if it is ok with that hunt. Some hunts say yes, others, no.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2009
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    2,451

    Default

    They sure come in handy for shooing away curious cows!! Of course you never swat at them either, could easily piss off a land owner, but they are the most inquisitive creatures!!! And not all hunt horses like a cow sniffing up their rump!!

    Also helpful for leading a rider-less horse that managed to break their reins.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2003
    Location
    Orlean, Virginia
    Posts
    3,031

    Thumbs up jmho!

    Good for leading a hilltopper horse over a jump too.....Loop/tie it to the reins and it adds a few more feet of distance between you and the horse so he doesn't jump on top of you and he has more room to maneuver without getting hit in the mouth. You climb over the jump and stand on landing side with that extra length and cluck for him to join you!

    Come to think of it; being able to lead a horse over a jump has become a lost skill hasn't it? I used to do it all the time. Not all meets were paneled like I needed.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 29, 2008
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    Or one some of us never had?! LOL. Remember 4 broken toes that way. But had I had a hunt whip with me...hummmmmmm...

    Is there value to being very comfortable hacking with a whip before taking it on a hunt? I always used a fly whisk with a crook handle for opening gates and shooing animals and never manned up to a whip - afraid of the fumble/tangle factor...



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2000
    Location
    Full time in Delhi, NY!
    Posts
    6,398

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mortebella View Post
    Is there value to being very comfortable hacking with a whip before taking it on a hunt? I always used a fly whisk with a crook handle for opening gates and shooing animals and never manned up to a whip - afraid of the fumble/tangle factor...
    Yes, there is value in hacking with your whip prior to going in the hunt field. 1) it gets your horse used to the lash dangling near him. 2) it allows you to get comfortable holding the reins, whip, & coiled lash while steering your cantering horse with what amounts to only 1 1/2 hands.

    There's even more value in getting your horse used to the cracking of the whip. Although YOU will not be cracking your whip, the staff around you may let go a volley that sounds like gun fire. Best be sure your horse isn't terrified and spins away leaving you in the dirt!
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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 29, 2008
    Posts
    1,036

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kryswyn View Post
    Yes, there is value in hacking with your whip prior to going in the hunt field. 1) it gets your horse used to the lash dangling near him. 2) it allows you to get comfortable holding the reins, whip, & coiled lash while steering your cantering horse with what amounts to only 1 1/2 hands.

    There's even more value in getting your horse used to the cracking of the whip. Although YOU will not be cracking your whip, the staff around you may let go a volley that sounds like gun fire. Best be sure your horse isn't terrified and spins away leaving you in the dirt!
    Ah-ha!!! I had been told as much, long LONG years ago by a hunt I capped in with in England (with a bunch of borrowed kit, and I was told to forget the whip, as I lacked that requisite hacking experience ) I had a borrowed horse too, so they didn't mention acclimating him, but that makes even MORE sense.



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