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View Poll Results: Does your barn allow you to jump outside of lessons?

Voters
145. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, we are allowed to jump outside of lessons

    79 54.48%
  • No, we are only allowed to jump when we are being watched in a lesson

    66 45.52%
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
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    2,201

    Default Barn rule: jumping outside of lessons?

    How many people board at a barn that doesn't allow them to jump outside of a lesson (e.g. on their own)?

    I have never boarded at such a place, but because I have always found barns that allow me to jump outside of lessons.

    But now, I have a youngster who hasn't been started over fences (and needs to be this year) and I found a barn & trainer I really like. Except one of the barn rules is no one is allowed to jump outside of lessons. Like I said, before that would usually be a deal breaker, because I had established jumpers and I don't need someone watching me like a baby every time I jumped them. But I'm reconsidering since for a while, I won't want to jump my youngin' out of lessons.

    So I'm curious to hear of how many others board at a barn with this rule and your thoughts. TIA!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2001
    Location
    Alaska. Not in an Igloo.
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    8,993

    Default

    My barns have always had that rule, although one of them the trainer gave me and another AA permission to jump since we usually ride together and work on projects/babies.
    Seig Heil Polo Shirt!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2009
    Location
    Cincinnati, OH
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    779

    Default

    That would be a deal breaker for me - my horse, my choice what to do and when....



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2008
    Location
    Watertown, MN
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    14

    Default

    As a barn owner and trainer, it is much easier and cheaper to get insurance if you don't allow jumping outside of lessons.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2008
    Location
    WNY
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    409

    Default

    I have boarded at MANY barns. I find that the most professional, high class barns do not allow jumping outside of lessons. The places where I have boarded that have allowed jumping outside of lessons have eventually led me to leave due to Laissez-faire attitudes outside of the ring as well.

    My current barn does not even allow people to do poles outside of lessons. The reason is simple- We have a huge, thriving lesson program. Boarders and leasers (of all ages) have come out to ride during lessons and have cut off lesson students because they were doing pole courses, etc. It has been bad enough that we have had students doing pole courses at the trot and have had boarders canter literally 3 feet in front of them and cut them off to get to the pole first. We finally had to say enough....but jumping outside of lessons have never been allowed.


    In my area it not being allowed to jump outside of a lesson is the price you pay to board at a great barn with a top-notch instructor. None of the top trainers in my area allow it.
    I WAS a proud member of the *I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday* clique..but now I am 30!!!!!!!!!!!
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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2003
    Location
    NJ
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    1,959

    Default

    I do not allow jumping outside of lessons in my barn.
    HappyHorseLover and people with that attitude are not welcome here.
    My barn, my rules.
    ...for there are wings on these hooves, the speed and power of foam-capped waves...
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    Proud member of the artists clique



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
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    2,201

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by watertownrider View Post
    As a barn owner and trainer, it is much easier and cheaper to get insurance if you don't allow jumping outside of lessons.
    This I didn't know. So is this the reason most barns don't allow it?

    Greystone, why don't you allow it since you seem to have such strong feelings?


    And how often do you take lessons in order to jump? I don't think it's a good idea to jump a horse hard once a week in a lesson and essentially have the rest of the week "off" just doing flat. So do people take multiple lessons a week that are lighter in intensity?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
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    6,723

    Default

    I don't take lessons at my barn except on the rare occasion when I want eyes on the ground to work on something specific. I can jump my horse whenever I want.
    Lesson students are not allowed to jump outside of lessons unless they have been given specific homework.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2004
    Posts
    1,045

    Default

    That would be an enormous deal breaker for me. Especially with a baby. When you're essentially doing 'nothing' (microscopic x rails) over and over with a baby, to teach the basic idea of jumping, no way i'm going to pay for lessons for that.

    Then again, I take lessons maybe once a year anyway, so of course it would be a deal breaker for me.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    PA
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    13,074

    Default

    Eventer here....never been at a barn with that rule.

    I've been at top facilities with olymipc level trainers. Such a rule would make it impossible for me to get competition ready. The trainer's schedule and mine don't always mesh....and trainers are not always around, especially in the winter when many go south and I may not have time to go at all or for the entire time.

    I usually have a young green horse too. With them...I tend to jump fewer fences at a time but jump more often. No way would I have time to take that many jumping lessons a week. (Besides...I tend to need more help in dressage since I would rather jump). I do try to take a lesson or two a week (jumping and dressage lessons--but I have more than one horse)....and it would still be a deal breaker for me.

    ETA: I'm typically jumping 3'6"-3'9" on my own with my more experienced horses and 2'9"-3" with the green horses. Been riding over 30 years and perfectly capable of training my horse on my own with an occassional help of a good eye on the ground and know when I need more help. Perhaps that is why I've never heard of such rule. I know one time where such a rule was applied to others in the barn but I was told specifically I could continue to jump on my own. A blanket rule like that with no flexibility would really bother me.
    Last edited by bornfreenowexpensive; Feb. 6, 2011 at 09:23 AM.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 13, 2008
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    1,703

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    All of the barns I've been at don't allow jumping without a trainer. Now, if there's some dinky little thing set up under 2ft, we can "jump" that by ourselves...



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 7, 2008
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    552

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    Depends on who is riding. Kids - no way. Adults, we will jump little stuff for fun. And, if the kids are riding with the adults - no jumping, period.
    And nothing bad happened!



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2007
    Posts
    338

    Default

    At the barn where I board, there is no jumping outside of lessons.

    We are allowed to do poles and we have the block system thing that allows you to raise cavallettis up to 2 ft. That we can do outside of lessons. We often set up grids with that and give the horses a good workout without jumping high.

    morganpony86- We have intense lessons, despite the fact that we only jump during lessons. Our horses are ridden on the flat and do cavalletti work almost every day. I don't think having an intense lesson once a week, and working only on the flat will hurt the horse. If anything, it helps save them. Like people, I believe a horse only has a certain amount of jumps, or miles, in them. Why waste them?



  14. #14
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    Feb. 5, 2003
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    NJ
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    Quote Originally Posted by morganpony86 View Post
    Greystone, why don't you allow it since you seem to have such strong feelings?

    And how often do you take lessons in order to jump? I don't think it's a good idea to jump a horse hard once a week in a lesson and essentially have the rest of the week "off" just doing flat. So do people take multiple lessons a week that are lighter in intensity?
    Mostly for safety and insurance purposes as well as to save the horses and preserve our programs.

    One one of my students, a successful A/A jumper who has been with me and with the same horse for eons in permitted to jump without me. I allow this simply because her school/work schedule is insane and she lives farther away so sometimes we just can't get our schedules together. She also is very sensible and I don't have to worry about her doing anything stupid.

    I absolutely do NOT believe horses NEED to jump more than once a week or that it is not healthy for them to do one jump lesson and then only hack the rest of the week - that is ludicrous. Our horses are jumped as little as possible, especially the made ones. They only have so many jumps in them you know... We jump for a reason only, to train, to tune. The greenbeans will jump often jump more often, as their buttons are still being installed. Doing flatwork does not mean the horse is "off"! I am quite certain our horses would rather be jumping around than doing a hard flatwork session! Each horse has his own blend of jump/lesson days, hard flat days, and light hack/trail days that keeps it tuned and happy.

    No one is permitted to ever jump one of my lesson horses in a practice ride (and to do so would result in them not being able to have practice rides anymore and possibly worse "punishment"). I am a small barn here and people come here and stay here because they like the way I do things. I create a program for each horse and that means I don't need the riders screwing things up when I'm not around. However, I also give my girls things to work on in lieu of jumping. They know how to set poles and lines and often practice exercises that we can do with jumps, only with poles, on their own. There's truly no NEED to jump anything. Very rarely, I will give someone an exercise to work on that involves crossrails, but I try to avoid that because of the insurance aspect. Thankfully, my girls scoff at the pictures and videos they see of other local girls running and jumping their horses around like crazy people... they have goals and feel that the fastest way to achieve them is by listening to me.
    ...for there are wings on these hooves, the speed and power of foam-capped waves...
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  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2009
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    The Great Plains of Canada
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bornfreenowexpensive View Post
    Such a rule would make it impossible for me to get competition ready. The trainer's schedule and mine don't always mesh....

    I usually have a young green horse too. With them...I tend to jump fewer fences at a time but jump more often. No way would I have time to take that many jumping lessons a week.
    ^ This

    I've boarded at one barn that instilled this rule a good year or so after I had moved there (not for insurance purposes, either). It was a deal-breaker for me and I immediately moved. I might not have a lesson every week, sometimes it is every two weeks. Or sometimes I do not have a lesson on a particular horse for months, as we work on developing something specific in preparation. Sometimes I have a green horse I am bringing up. Being restricted to jumping in lessons only would be highly impractical. I currently board at a barn where jumping outside of lessons is permitted though it is not a jumping barn specifically (multi-discipline). Finding a facility that allows me to both bring in my own coach and jump outside lessons is difficult but is absolutely vital.

    I've been riding over 20 years (and jumping much of that) and train on the side when I am not working my main job. I need an experienced eye on the ground and certainly, as any rider, do require guidance, especially since my goals now with my current horses are loftier than years ago, but I am perfectly capable of schooling over jumps and applying what I learnt in my lessons to my own schooling rides.

    I have no issue with such a rule implemented for the benefit of kids or young riders (say, under 18) or even for lesson horses (for sure!), however I do have a problem with it for experienced adults and/or pros. And esp with simply poles being unable to be used!!
    ....horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
    ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep. 26, 2010
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    5,176

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    ^^ here, here.

    While I wouldn't want to "push the envelope" while jumping alone, I don't want to have to be in a lesson just to pop over something small.

    I can see rules like that for people under 18, but experienced adults should have some freedom over what they do.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    5,500

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    I voted "no" because I've never boarded at a barn that allowed jumping outside of lessons, but that doesn't reflect my current situation. Now that I have my horses at home, of course, I jump completely at will.

    I've always supported the no-jumping-outside-of-lessons rule. At the barns I've been at through the years I think there have always been too many (and by "too many" I mean at least one) kids who push the limits on what they should be doing and too many adults without a realistic view of what their ability to handle [even small] jumps is. FTR, cavaletti never counted as jumps at any of those barns, so it's not that you couldn't work on poles and cavaletti at will.

    With that being said, I've helped out every trainer I've ever ridden with by schooling and showing horses for them. So I've always had leniency to do what I felt would benefit my horse the most. I guess I've always viewed the rule as being in place for a good reason, but usually open to interpretation if your skill level is obviously at a place where you can handle some of your own work.

    When I boarded horses here I absolutely stuck by the "no jumping without supervision" rule. So maybe between the two extremes? What that really translated to, with the group of amateurs I had here, was that they only jumped if I was helping them or if a trainer came out to give them real lessons.



  18. #18
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    Sep. 30, 2007
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    I am at a barn that does not allow jumping outside of lessons whatsoever- not even a 6" crosspole. I really dislike that though I am sure it all has to do with liability. I just wish it were OK to jump small jumps outside of lessons. To me it hardly seems that you would increase your injury rate jumping say 18" jumps or even 2' jumps. Yes I can understand that the reason they don't allow that is because they can't easily police people who would attempt to push the envelope and jump 3", 6" what have you higher than the limit. I will be moving back to my old place (where there are no rules about jumping) in part for this reason. I did take my girl on a trail ride yesterday and we did jump a few natural obstacles, fun fun fun. I like to pop my girl over a fence or two whenever I ride (literally a fence or two). Also like to trot cavaletti etc. If I could afford to take 2-3 lessons per week, I might do better with a no jumping outside of lessons type establishment.



  19. #19
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    2,201

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    Quote Originally Posted by TesignedInGold View Post
    At the barn where I board, there is no jumping outside of lessons.

    We are allowed to do poles and we have the block system thing that allows you to raise cavallettis up to 2 ft. That we can do outside of lessons. We often set up grids with that and give the horses a good workout without jumping high.
    Isn't that jumping outside of lessons, though?? I'm confused.


    And can someone enlighten me more on the liability/insurance thing? Seems like most people who board at a barn with that rule is a boarder/knows of a boarder who is "exempt" from the rule. How does that work?
    How often is the rule set up because of liability? Or just "because I said so"?

    And PNW- yes, cavaletti work is allowed. This makes me a little more lenient to the rule, since I can spend hours doing distance work with my greenie with poles on the ground.



  20. #20
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    Jan. 21, 2010
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    Random additional (related) question:

    For those who board at barns that don't allow jumping outside of lessons, what about jumping when you go to shows? I totally show by myself and plan to go to some shows that I KNOW other boarders won't be attending.
    Will that not be "allowed" or will piss the trainer off? I don't need her to go with me; I regularly show by myself.



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