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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2008
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    128

    Default Anthony Patch was a CANTER horse???




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 6, 2010
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    At the barn :)
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    Default

    Whoa, that's cool!!! I never knew that!!!
    Thanks for the link!



  3. #3
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    Sep. 22, 2010
    Location
    NY
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    1,182

    Default

    Cool story! I love my racetrack reject!

    Amy

    "I decided I am going to live, or at least try to live, the way I want,
    with dignity, with courage, with humor, with composure."



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2007
    Posts
    592

    Default

    No he wasn't... from Lainey's blog from right after Rolex:

    "To clarify some rumors, let me digress in retelling the story of how Alex came into our barn. In 2004, Beth Mueller, who had briefly leased my first preliminary horse, had given me a call telling me she had recently acquired a horse off the track that although he was beautiful in appearance, he was equally as difficult to ride. Because of his inconsistent temperament and his inability to finish in the top placings at the Charlestown race track, she offered the owner $500 to rescue the tiny little Thoroughbred from existing in a dog food canister. When he became too difficult to ride, she sent him to Paul and Lauren Tjaden, who at the time were in the business of re-selling horses for the sport of eventing. Coincidentally, soon after Beth told me about her new horse off the track, Paul called me up asking if I would be interested in a talented little horse, but warned me of his spooky nature and insisted that I give him a try, since he had been taking up room at their farm for over six months with no interested buyers. That week, I came to look at Alex with my mom, and as soon as Lauren lunged him, despite freaking out and throwing a shoe, mom and I looked at eachother thinking, wow, this is the real deal! He was such a beautiful mover with natural suspension and thrusted forward with ease from his hind end. His self-carriage was equally as amazing as he zoomed around the now ten meter circle swapping leads every other stride. So, I asked myself, ok so what, he’s a little hot under the collar....what’s the catch here? After taking us nearly an hour loading him into the trailer, in which he flipped over backwards during one of his frantic episodes, we finally were hauling out of the driveway. Although it was a hot and sticky summer day, all of the doors and windows on the trailer were shut to be sure Al would not kick, chew, paw, or throw himself out of the trailer. We had signed an agreement with the Tjadens that we would need a fifteen day trial with the horse before handing them a check, which although wasn’t enough to afford a used saddle, we certainly did not want to have a liability on our farm. However, as soon as we unloaded the now sweaty and tucked-up sixteen hand bay onto Crow’s Ear Farm, his whole attitude had changed."



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2000
    Location
    Concord, NH
    Posts
    4,935

    Default

    Which actually doesn't say he is or is not a CANTER horse. He did come off the track.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2010
    Posts
    137

    Default

    There's already been a thread about this: Old Thread.
    I'm so busy I don't know if I found a rope or lost my horse



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2009
    Location
    Warrenton, VA
    Posts
    443

    Default



    given the dates on the old thread- bet I was on the track with him!!! (and cussing his crazy a$$)


    funny and very glad all is well
    owner and friend of members of the Limping And Majestic Equine Society.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2008
    Posts
    128

    Default

    I've learned that yes, AP was in fact a CANTER horse. Beth apparently got him through CANTER, who helped broker the deal.


    Quote Originally Posted by Samantha37 View Post
    No he wasn't... from Lainey's blog from right after Rolex:

    "To clarify some rumors, let me digress in retelling the story of how Alex came into our barn. In 2004, Beth Mueller, who had briefly leased my first preliminary horse, had given me a call telling me she had recently acquired a horse off the track that although he was beautiful in appearance, he was equally as difficult to ride. Because of his inconsistent temperament and his inability to finish in the top placings at the Charlestown race track, she offered the owner $500 to rescue the tiny little Thoroughbred from existing in a dog food canister. When he became too difficult to ride, she sent him to Paul and Lauren Tjaden, who at the time were in the business of re-selling horses for the sport of eventing. Coincidentally, soon after Beth told me about her new horse off the track, Paul called me up asking if I would be interested in a talented little horse, but warned me of his spooky nature and insisted that I give him a try, since he had been taking up room at their farm for over six months with no interested buyers. That week, I came to look at Alex with my mom, and as soon as Lauren lunged him, despite freaking out and throwing a shoe, mom and I looked at eachother thinking, wow, this is the real deal! He was such a beautiful mover with natural suspension and thrusted forward with ease from his hind end. His self-carriage was equally as amazing as he zoomed around the now ten meter circle swapping leads every other stride. So, I asked myself, ok so what, he’s a little hot under the collar....what’s the catch here? After taking us nearly an hour loading him into the trailer, in which he flipped over backwards during one of his frantic episodes, we finally were hauling out of the driveway. Although it was a hot and sticky summer day, all of the doors and windows on the trailer were shut to be sure Al would not kick, chew, paw, or throw himself out of the trailer. We had signed an agreement with the Tjadens that we would need a fifteen day trial with the horse before handing them a check, which although wasn’t enough to afford a used saddle, we certainly did not want to have a liability on our farm. However, as soon as we unloaded the now sweaty and tucked-up sixteen hand bay onto Crow’s Ear Farm, his whole attitude had changed."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 8, 2002
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    9,547

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Eventfan4LIFE View Post
    I've learned that yes, AP was in fact a CANTER horse. Beth apparently got him through CANTER, who helped broker the deal.
    Yup

    He was purchased through trainer listings, with help from fairweather, way back in the day
    "smile a lot can let us ride happy,it is good thing"

    My CANTER blog.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2007
    Posts
    592

    Default

    My apologizes! Did not realize the initial owner had purchased him with the involvement of CANTER.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2008
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    128

    Default

    No apology needed. Technically you were correct!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2000
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    Now In the Sandhills, NC mostly
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    6,769

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    Yep, he was! Others answered better than I could, but as I told the writer of the story, "Alex" as he was called was pulled out of the stall and wasn't even close to sound. Beth bought him anyway and the rest is history!
    Had I seen Laine's blog entry or had she asked us (I haven't before now) I could have sent her his original listing--yes I'm lame, i used to keep them all because they meant so much to me as a startup organization--every horse out of there was a success to me.
    He was not "rescued" by Laine from what I understand.
    I still have his first owners (beth) proud smile plastered on my office wall-- of her sitting on a very small dark bay gelding that would become Anthony Patch. He had a presence even back then when he was pulled out of his dark, really rough stall at the former Shenendoah downs. <shudder>



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 3, 2008
    Posts
    1,085

    Default Why are first responder rescuers so possessive of the word "Rescue"

    I've never understood why people get so riled up about the use of the word "rescue". I believe I read the other day that 3/4 of all TB's coming off the track are sent to slaughter, euthanized or abandoned. Given those numbers, I believe that anyone who takes an OTTB for a second career has rescued it. If that offends you, you're not paying attention to the more likely than not fate of most of these horses.

    I also won't begrudge the person who buys a restarted TB from one of the many retraining organizations instead of a European WB from calling what they've done "rescue" because they have contributed to the rescue of that horse. Buying from these organizations keeps them in "business" and builds the market for horses coming off the track. All of this is a wonderful thing.

    Sometimes I feel like some of the people who pull horses from the kill pens or the trucks have a bizarre mental discorder when it comes to animal rescue. It's not hoarding but there is a component of "no one is doing as good of a deed as I am". That mentality is not helpful because you need the "end users" to purchase those horses so that you can take on new ones. To deny people the feeling of having done a good deed just because you feel that it wasn't the "goodest" of deeds (which would have been pulling a permanently lame one off of a moving truck and letting it live its life out in your field) is counterproductive to the mission of finding second careers for as many horses coming off the track as possible.

    I got my dog from a no kill shelter. He was brought to the no kill shelter by shelter volunteer who pulled him from a kill shelter and fostered him until there was room at the no kill shelter. Who rescued the dog? One the one hand, by the time I got the dog there was no danger of him being PTS. So the actual act of rescue was the original woman. On the other hand, I've been feeding him, housing him and supporting him for 8 years and when he has a vet emergency, it's my credit card that gets charged. So I like to think that I have a part in his rescue story. And when I took him home instead of buying a puppy from a breeder, that opened a spot for another needy dog at the no kill shelter.
    I'm not a dog trainer. I couldn't have taken a risk on a dog that had not gone through some personality testing before I took it home but I wanted to do the right thing, so I participated in the rescue pipeline to my best ability. I liked the feeling of having done something good for an animal.

    To deny people who do the same for horses, regardless of their motivation, that feeling of having done a good deed, seems crazy if you want to inspire more people to take the plunge.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2001
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    Hangin' on by a thread...
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    3,326

    Default

    NC Rider - I think it's the current culture of "self grandization" that is so prevalent today that really irks people. I do get a little irritated by all the people who say their OTTB is a "rescue" (I've "rescued" three of them, straight off the track, and paid more than meat price but less than asking price- none of them were in danger of being slaughtered), but the thing that bothers me most (although I keep quiet about it) is all the people who swear - and talk loudly about it - that their horse was "abused" before they got it. I've had many, many horses throughout my life, and none of them were "abused". sure. some of them had iffy training, or were ridden poorly, but none of them were abused.

    So, I guess it's that desire to be a bit special, because it's that person's identity wrapped up in his/her horse, to lead to calling himself/herself that horse's savior. And maybe Laine IS that horse's savior. Let her think so, if it makes her feel better about herself. It doesn't sound like AP in any particular trouble before she found him, but it also does sound like he had undiscovered potential that Laine brought out.

    I'd like to think that my current horse has it best with ME, but I know better than that. I guess I agree with NCRider, although I am not a Laine fan, in that it does no harm to allow people their little fantasies and their good deeds.
    "Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work." - Thomas Edison

    So, the Zen Buddhist says to the hotdog vendor, "Make me one with everything."



  15. #15
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    May. 3, 2008
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    1,085

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    See Eventer Mi, I actually think people like you are too modest about what you've done. You say your horses weren't in any danger but how do you know that? A racehorse who can't race and isn't worth anything in the shed, has no real value. Horses with no real value don't end up well most of the time.

    I think if you get them off the track close in time to their last race, chances are pretty good that they're still doing OK and have not been abused or neglected. What happens after that is where it gets murky. When the owners don't want to invest any more money in an animal that will provide no return. That's when care starts to slide. Or they're given to so and so who has a cousin who dates a woman who runs a riding stable. Only that "riding stable" is really a dealer who has a side business shipping to Canada. Your "in good condition" horse you picked up on the track could have gone downhill fast if you hadn't chosen to take him, in spite of the care and attention he had while still racing.

    So I admire people like you and think you've done a good thing. I admire high level riders who for whatever reason, choose to take a chance on these horses because their success is good for the future racing leftovers.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 1, 2007
    Posts
    474

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NCRider View Post
    Sometimes I feel like some of the people who pull horses from the kill pens or the trucks have a bizarre mental discorder when it comes to animal rescue. It's not hoarding but there is a component of "no one is doing as good of a deed as I am". That mentality is not helpful because you need the "end users" to purchase those horses so that you can take on new ones.
    The issue in this thread, as I see it, is that the OP was surprised to learn Anthony Patch had been a CANTER horse...not "first responder" rescuers demanding their props.

    No criticism toward Laine, who obviously loves TB's, but wouldn't it be nice if, just once, she had acknowledged he was a CANTER horse? How does that take away from what she's done with him?

    That's why I DO think "first responders" deserve a little more credit than those who have bought or adopted thoroughbreds. They are the ones in the trenches, often making agonizing decisions about which horses to save versus which cannot be saved. The fact is, if the CANTER volunteer hadn't shown up that day to see AP (who was LAME, let's not forget), he probably would have gone somewhere bad.

    Kudos to all of you have adopted horses from rescues like CANTER, but double KUDOS to the wonderful people of CANTER.



  17. #17
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    Oct. 14, 2000
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    Now In the Sandhills, NC mostly
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    6,769

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    Err, not sure if that is referencing my post or not, but if so, you just wont find me use the word too much rescue at all. My use of the word above is referencing previous mentions of the horse having been rescued by his current owner when it wasnt entirely accurate. I'm in no way taking away anything done with the horse, because it is amazing and i have mad respect for anybody who has vision to bring a hot ottb along to the level he competes, and is helpful to point out that success and say hey! Look! Broken, little, skinny, pathetic horses can be world class too! provided you have vision, patience and the skills to bring it along. The display of love after the showjump round at rolex was overwhelming. You didnt need to pull a horse from the depths of a dog food can to see that. isnt that the success story?

    To say that you never know where a horse is headed, or that it was "rescued" from a home that provided good care is a little offensive to the previous good-care-yet not right fit owner, isnt it? I would be upset if someone said they "rescued" a horse from me, but wouldnt be upset if they said "he was a rescue".
    It would also mean that every Sale horse in the world is rescued the moment it doesnt sell to a killer sale
    Definitely not begrudging a good deed, please dont take my comment that way. Of course, maybe you werent directing that to me at all in which case this is all moot



  18. #18
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    Jun. 17, 2000
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    Durham/Chapel Hill nc
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    3,707

    Default

    But NCRider, let's say I buy a horse from a hunter barn, or a lesson barn, or a dressage barn, where they are treating the horse the way they treat all their horses. Then let's say I disapprove of how they treat their horses, because they get longed, or not turned out, or are too fat, or have to stand tacked up, or whatever. I believe my way is better fort he horse, so I tell everyone I "rescued" the horse.

    Think that barn is going to be very excited to sell another horse to me, or someone like me?

    Same thing happens on the track. Sure, three of my horses were donated to CANTER. They are fabulous horses I am lucky to have, despite two of them having a bow. If I went around calling them "rescues" how inspired do you think their trainer would be to donate more lovely horses for rehoming? A lot less hassle to send them to a sale than to have people thinking trainer is an abusive jerk.

    At least, that's my understanding, and it makes sense to me.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
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    PA
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    12,723

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    IMO only the people who pull out of the kill pen are doing a "rescue" as far as I'm concerned.

    I've bought OTTBs....they were not "rescued". They were just failures as race horses and I've taken them and given them a second career.

    That isn't rescue...maybe recycling But someone who helps facilitate that 'recycling' should be happy to see them go on to a good home.

    ETA: Laine may not know anything about CANTER. She got him from the Tjadens.....who bought and sold a lot of OTTBs. Usually pretty nice ones too. She may have just known he was a former race horse. I've looked at horses with the Tjadens before....and almost bought one (they sold him before I could get them a check). I wouldn't have known where they got him other than he was off the track.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  20. #20
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    May. 3, 2008
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    In my mind, the only way a racing owner or trainer has any right to complain about the use of the word rescue is if they give all of their retired racehorses the same care they give the ones who are still racing.

    I understand the logic behind not wanting to offend people in the racing industry by calling their byproduct a "rescue" because of the very real threat that they'll shut down the pipeline and ship directly to slaughter but part of me really rebels at denying people who are doing a good deed a public acknowledgement of the fact that what they've done is really cool just because of the fear that if we acknowledge that a lot of these horses are headed to a bad end if someone doesn't intervene, we'll be implying that the owners and trainers of said horses haven't properly cared for them.



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