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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,133

    Default Lazy Fat Young horse

    Not sure if there is any suppliment that may be lacking in his diet?

    Coming 3 year old, is a SLUG, he's SO unbelievably lazy. He's also chubby. I had him out in the arena just to run around a little since he cant out in the paddock (too hard out there), and I have to chase him....he decides he "may" trot...but only if he can grab anything that possibly resembles food on the way (ie. flowers under jumps).

    He knows how to lunge, but there is no way I could get him to canter on the lunge (which I am ok with right now because he is just 3)...but noooo effort.

    Is he doomed to be a lazy horse, or is this (hopefully) a phase?

    I dont want to give him any grain as he is really tubby right now, but maybe a handful every day wouldnt hurt now that I am "trying" to work him?

    Any suggestions for the backing process with a lazy youngen?!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,218

    Default

    What IS he eating? How fat is he? Is he metabolic-fat, like cresty neck and fatty deposits?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,133

    Default

    Until thisweek, he has been on a purina growth (only a handful) and a handful of fat/fibre pellets. He has free choice hay and its unfortunatley this time of year fairy high in alfalfa. Generally, its a good grass hay.

    Not a cresty neck, he just looks like an old school QH type...very stocky. Can barely palpate the ribs.

    As of right now, he is no longer on any "grain type", he is just on straight hay.

    Im hoping once he becomes more fit, he will want to focus more on working than finding food! I rarely see him away from the hay.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 30, 2006
    Location
    Little Rhody
    Posts
    3,334

    Default

    How tall is he? What does he weigh? And what size are his feet?



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    3,918

    Default

    Personally I would put the hay in a slow feeder type of net/hay bag so that he can still have it in front of him but not be able to gorge himself on it. Are you weighing out his hay to see how many pounds he's getting a day? Since he's young and possibly still growing, I would give him a pound or so of a ration balancer to make sure he's getting everything he needs vitamin/mineral wise. You could remove a couple of pounds of the alfalfa to compensate for the additional calories from the RB.

    Caitlin
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 27, 2010
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    2,561

    Default

    Consider having the vet do a blood panel to see if there is any metabolic things readily apparent.

    He's probably lazy 'cause he's fat and out of shape (I'm lazy too and for much the same reasons). Take some weight off (the slow feeder hay net is a good idea), weigh the feed and feed no more than 1.5% of his ideal body wt (if he SHOULD weigh 1000 lbs this would mean 15 pounds of hay a day). A recommended amount of a ration balancer (or a vitamin/mineral supplement if you really feel he needs it or he's still growing). No grain. Pull out the alfalfa if possible or feed as much grass within the weight amounts as you can. Work...starting lightly and building over a month...maybe 5 minutes at a trot each way on the lunge line and increase by 5 minutes each way each week...at the end of the month he would be doing 20 minutes each way. Take his blanket off if he's being blanketed...let him burn some calories keeping warm. While cooling down you can do some ground work with him to make life interesting....walking through obstacles etc so that his entire attention is NOT on food.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2010
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,362

    Default

    Check for insulin resistance. It occurs in young horses. I know 2 two year olds that had it. Both foundered.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,218

    Default

    Yep, get a muzzle on him, or small-hole net his hay, preferably multiple bags spread out over as much area as possible to encourage more movement. Double-bag if you can't get small hole nets but there quite a few of those these days - Nibble Net, Freedom Feeder, Equinet, I've heard of people using hockey nets but the holes may be too large for this (you could double it up though), or a Texas Hay Net if you've got round bales.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,133

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coloredcowhorse View Post
    Consider having the vet do a blood panel to see if there is any metabolic things readily apparent.

    He's probably lazy 'cause he's fat and out of shape (I'm lazy too and for much the same reasons). Take some weight off (the slow feeder hay net is a good idea), weigh the feed and feed no more than 1.5% of his ideal body wt (if he SHOULD weigh 1000 lbs this would mean 15 pounds of hay a day). A recommended amount of a ration balancer (or a vitamin/mineral supplement if you really feel he needs it or he's still growing). No grain. Pull out the alfalfa if possible or feed as much grass within the weight amounts as you can. Work...starting lightly and building over a month...maybe 5 minutes at a trot each way on the lunge line and increase by 5 minutes each way each week...at the end of the month he would be doing 20 minutes each way. Take his blanket off if he's being blanketed...let him burn some calories keeping warm. While cooling down you can do some ground work with him to make life interesting....walking through obstacles etc so that his entire attention is NOT on food.

    Haha, he's TOTALLY the fat kid in the candy store. I will try increasing his workload a little. He's out all day and most nights if they are tolerable, andwith a herd so I cant really limit his hay.

    He IS still growing (bum up quite a bit, and he's 3 in May), he's a warmblood cross. I seriously think he's just ho-hum about work and very Labrador Retriever like about food.

    Baby bootcamp?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
    6,133

    Default

    Im not too worried about insulin resistence. He's fat, but he's not morbidly obese with fat deposits or a cresty neck. Im pretty certain he's just a hungry growing weed. His mom was really stocky, so maybe he's just taking after her at an early age lol.

    This is a picture of him from 2 months ago (he was 2 1/2 years old)
    http://img225.imageshack.us/i/rorynovember.jpg/

    He was "supposed" to be running around in the sandring for exercise....but I caught him sneaking the grass.

    I dont think he's massive...but he's certainly more than "well loved".



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 21, 2008
    Location
    Sonoma County, California
    Posts
    2,491

    Default

    My friend's 3 year old was so 'lazy' that the trainer drew blood with her spurs to make him "learn" to move off the leg.

    He was later diagnosed with PSSM.

    My friend wished she had looked for physical issues before assuming said horse was just lazy.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,218

    Default

    If you can barely palpate ribs, he's obese
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
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    Default

    Whats PSSM? Should all lazy horses get tested for this? He's not lazy as in refuses to run,he CAN run around quite willingy on his own terms. But while in "work" he would rather scavange for food.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    If you can barely palpate ribs, he's obese
    Lol....I know Alright, time for backing and gallop laps!



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Holy crap Squishy he is fat cute but fat... Oh my.

    He's going to need some nutrition regardless so put him on a good vitamin/mineral supplement. Then make him run around.. A lot!
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2007
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    235

    Default

    My mare went from responsive, but a bit lazy to totally sluggish. Crops/spurs had little to no impact. Tested her for lyme, hoof testers, chiro, nothing showed up. Finally stuck some hoof boots on her, as she was barefoot. Big difference. Put shoes on her and she was back to herself. She never showed any lameness/soreness issues. She was 4yo at the time.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 21, 2010
    Posts
    368

    Default

    On the other hand, lots of youngsters will seem slooooow and lazy for their first year or two. I bought a 2 yr old ARABIAN as an endurance prospect (and he needed rescuing). this is not a breed known for slow and lazy behavior. I got on him a few times as a 4 yr old then began to regularly ride him when he was 5. I was ready to sell him as a western pleasure horse, he was soooo slow under saddle, so lazy it was just dissapointing. Then after he'd been under saddle and doing W/T/C on the trails for about 8 months he got fitter (he was always amazingly balanced) and WOKE UP! We haven't had a lazy moment since. Just leave your youngster to growup with 24/7 turnout if possible preferably with other young or active boys. Come bac to training later on.

    chicamuxen



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2009
    Location
    Montreal, Qc
    Posts
    2,823

    Default

    I'm seeing more and more of fat dogs, cats and now horses...and kids.
    It is never good to be overweight, it is our responsability as a owner/parent to take care of our beloved ones.

    Pony boot camp asap!

    I would have the vet look at him, making sure what kind of exercices would be good to start with and don't go to fast with his 'rehabilitation' as your horse could have more chances of injuries in this condition.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2007
    Posts
    1,793

    Default

    My bet is if you got your horse down to what is an appropriate weight my guess is he would have more energy.

    Dalemma



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
    Posts
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    Default

    Awww... I know!!! Sob sob. If he was a dog, he would totally be a lab. I have TBs and one is a hard keeper....this one is SO the opposite!

    He's got good big feet, and big joints...at least he's not on toothpick legs. I know he's still young but Im thinking about breaking him this week and getting him lunging a little more (was only doing once a week at most, just walk and a bit of trot). Such a catch 22 of too much work for a young horse, and not enough. I think in his situation the work wont be a bad thing for him. Obviously I'll keep it easy, but a lot of trot work might slim him down a little.

    I hope now that he is in an "up" phase (his bum is about 2" taller than his withers), that he will just disperse the fat lol.

    he's a short pudgy guy, about 15.2+ at the withers, and just over 16hh in the bum. I really hope he doesnt end up looking like a fat draft!!! he's "supposed" to be a hunter, but he thinks he's "supposed" to rid the world of all food.



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