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  1. #1
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    Default Head moving side to side

    What is your first thought when you see a horse trotting in a frame and clearing moving head side to side (but not at the poll).
    "The mighty oak is a nut who stood its ground"

    "...you'll never win Olympic gold by shaking a carrot stick at a warmblood..." see u at x



  2. #2
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    My first thought is an unsteady contact. Which can mean steadiness of the contact and how they are asking for the connection and engagement/collection.
    "Relinquish your whip!!"



  3. #3
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    Is the horse moving its head so it swings towards the leg that is landing? Chris Irwin has riders do this to help encourage looseness and relaxation, as the horse does this naturally to a certain extent. If someone exagerated or overdid this side to side action I can see the horse picking this up as a habit.

    If the horse is swinging away from the leg that is reaching down, I would think bilateral lameness.



  4. #4
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    The head/neck seems to be out the way of the shoulder moving forward so the head moves back over to the side of the raised leg as the leg reaches down.
    "The mighty oak is a nut who stood its ground"

    "...you'll never win Olympic gold by shaking a carrot stick at a warmblood..." see u at x



  5. #5
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    Default

    Based on your description of the timng, I would think the horse has been ridden to encourage the exagerated natural swing of the neck.



  6. #6
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    Default

    My first question would be to know what age the horse was and how the rest of it was moving. Also, I would agree this may be happening due to trying to get the horse to relax, but over time can be habit forming.



  7. #7
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    Default

    My first thought would be uneven hands on the part of the rider. Although, my gelding cant seem to go forward without his head 'helping' him so who knows?



  8. #8
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    Sounds like the horse is ridden by someone who has that awful idea that their inside rein is supposed to be busy. Yuck.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
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    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ridealot View Post
    My first question would be to know what age the horse was and how the rest of it was moving. Also, I would agree this may be happening due to trying to get the horse to relax, but over time can be habit forming.
    I've been seeing it on and off in various videos but the example that I am using to answer questions was a horse on the DVD " Classical vs. Classique " As I recall, it was a large european warmblood trained through at least 4th and may have even been PSG, I don't remember. What I do remember is several shots where the camera is on the rail and the horse is coming toward the camera and the horse is rocking back and forth with the head and neck. He was a big mover. I believe the reason why the horse was there for the DVD is he was having problems with collection at the canter.
    "The mighty oak is a nut who stood its ground"

    "...you'll never win Olympic gold by shaking a carrot stick at a warmblood..." see u at x



  10. #10
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    Default

    Maybe you should watch that video again and listen more carefully the explanation regarding that particular horse/training/bad habit or on purpose.

    Without the video, background, explanation, it is really hard to tell what was going on.

    Sometimes, such videos tends to pick the worse rides to demonstrate and validate their points as well....or make up something really
    bad...just beware.



  11. #11
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    Default

    My first thought would be someone is see-sawing the bit.



  12. #12
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    Default

    my first thought is it's displaced energy. that can be caused by see sawing, lameness, habit, on the forehand, not straight... you name it
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  13. #13
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by EqTrainer View Post
    Sounds like the horse is ridden by someone who has that awful idea that their inside rein is supposed to be busy. Yuck.
    I'd go one step further and look for inside and outside busy hands. Years ago, I saw a "trainer" at a show telling her student, dressage is easy, just do this (and she see-sawed her hands). Needless to say, horse went in with head swaying back and forth. Take a look at the riders hands, you'll probably see them moving back and forth.

    Back to OP's question - some good trainers will warm up with a bit of over-bending right, left, right - as a suppling exercise, so you have to put it in context too. If it is just a short, obviously purposeful side to side, that would be different.

    And sometimes you have a lovely rider and horse who are just going through a momentary bad patch - horse might have spooked, braced, and rider is just trying to re-focus them, and resoften the neck. So, what I would think would depend on the circumstances...



  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches View Post
    My first thought would be someone is see-sawing the bit.
    Usually is. Watch the hands and see if they are moving in sync with the head.
    www.hartetoharte.org
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  15. #15
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    Default

    Um, "unsteady hands" pretty much covers that.
    "Relinquish your whip!!"



  16. #16
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    Default

    Phooey. I wish I still had the DVD so I could look at it again.

    Displaced energy:
    I wondered about whether the horse,trying to manage a great deal of power behind, but unable, for some reason, to really come up through the spine, was sending the power through the shoulder, (or maybe out the side of the neck?) rather than through the poll
    "The mighty oak is a nut who stood its ground"

    "...you'll never win Olympic gold by shaking a carrot stick at a warmblood..." see u at x



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