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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    the evergreen state!
    Posts
    1,293

    Default Do You Ever Miss Your Hometown because of the Horse Keeping?

    I know, the grass is always greener, yadda yadda yadda.

    But lately I've been really missing the east coast. OK maybe not this week with all the snow you guys are getting, LOL.

    But seriously, I've been in the PNW for almost 8 years, and I just miss "the way things are done" back east.

    When I go back home I see all those beautiful farms on rolling hills. I imagine my horses galloping over those hills, and sigh when I think how they will likely never get to know that unbridled joy out here.

    I get so jealous when you guys talk about "small" 1-2 acre paddocks...to my horses that would be absolute heaven.

    I hear you guys talk about round bales and large pastures and hay 24/7...and thats just not the norm here.

    I see dry sunny days and we're all rain from october - july.

    There are good things about living here, and I have come to grips with horsekeeping out here. But it feels so different!

    I'm missing my roots. We do have mild summers with very little humidity, and there is usually only a few ice-breaking days in the winter.

    But oh...those rolling hills...



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2003
    Posts
    5,866

    Default

    I grew up in rural but civilized and very green England. I now live in Utah. About as far from civilized and very green as you could get.

    There are plusses and minuses to all things, though.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 15, 2004
    Location
    Lancaster, PA, USA
    Posts
    7,864

    Default

    Nope. Original home is upstate NY. The weather is better here! Far less snow!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
    Posts
    5,882

    Default

    I grew up in southeastern PA, which I will still argue is the "horsiest" place on the planet... or at least the most convenient place to own horses.

    Tack stores galore. Horse shows for almost any level and discipline every weekend. Some of the best vets and farriers in the country. And you never had to drive more than an hour to reach any of them.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    Yup...miss the East Coast, where I can afford to keep a horse. Here, absolutely no way. Even if I had a full time job/was not a student. I love it here for other reasons though, and I'm willing to wait for horses.

    I do know how you feel. I'd have a hard time keeping a horse somewhere they couldn't be turned out on a few grassy acres all day/night (depending on the season.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8,250

    Default

    I opened this thread this morning and just had to chuckle! MyHorseFaith, you must really love snow!
    Seriously though, if I moved to the other side of the country, I would probably be homesick at the change of the seasons as well. Perhaps it is time to plan an east coast vacation? Just a thought.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2007
    Posts
    3,928

    Default

    I got homesick every winter when I lived in northern CO for nice mild winters that didn't stay below freezing for weeks at a time and dump lots of snow. Eventually it got so bad that I moved back south.

    Now sometimes I miss the pastures we had on my 90 acre farm up there as there is not enough water down here for much aside from scrub and mesquite.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2009
    Location
    south eastern US
    Posts
    2,534

    Default

    My situation is flip flopped. I grew up in the city in Southern California which is no one's idea of "horse heaven". I now live in rural Central Georgia where land is affordable and my horses have the luxury of 5 acres of grass in the summer, big round bales in the winter, and 24/7 turnout with a barn for foul weather. Love it here and don't miss Southern California at all.
    "My biggest fear is that when I die my husband is going to try to sell all my horses and tack for what I told him they cost."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    the evergreen state!
    Posts
    1,293

    Default

    I'm jealous!

    Ya, there are some farms here that have acreage- but by and large- everyone keeps horses on small spaces, or lots of horses on larger space. The word "pasture" can mean 10 to 5 acres, but usually means 1-2, or even just a piece of an acre. There just isn't a lot of space left between the mountains and the sound - very evident if you fly over on a clear day.

    DH and I have talked about moving in the next few years- but right now its just talk. If we did move it would likely be to the Denver area (for other reasons), and not to the east coast. I haven't done my research of that area yet- but I'd like to think there is a decent life for horses out there.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Location
    Lakeland, FL
    Posts
    203

    Default

    OMG ... really? I `can` say it out loud?
    ............ YES YES YES!!! .................

    Good Lord I am trying so hard to acclimate to horse keeping here on the other side of the state from you. (although I did spend a few years over in the land of rain and more rain)

    I keep searching for knee deep green pastures, black 4 board fencing, box stalls that are airy and sunlit and cross fencing!!! So far I'm still horseless here due to the need to find boarding first which is hampered by what must be my misconceptions built on East Coast horse keeping.

    I assume I'll acclimate somewhat ... eventually.
    "Gypsy gold does not chink and glitter, it gleams in the sun and neighs in the dark"



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2003
    Location
    Windward Farm, Washougal, WA- our work in progress, our money pit, our home!
    Posts
    7,837

    Default

    Well, as a native Washingtonian, don't let the door hit ya on the way out! More space for the rest of us.

    If you live in the Puget Sound, then yeah, there is NO LAND. The vast majority of the population of the PNW is located in the greater Seattle Metroplex, so it shouldn't be a surprise.

    If you head south of Portland, there is land still available, but really, Oregon and Washington are have two halves, and both are vastly different in climate and population. West? Cool, mild, wet and densely populated, with forest and mountains making up the land not built on. East? Dry, more extreme weather, desert-like, unpopulated, except for a few large towns/small cities. There are some lovely "horsey" areas on the East side, but there are no jobs for the people and they are miles, and miles from horsey activities.

    I do think the hardest part of horse showing here is the distances you must travel, the money you need to buy enough land near a population center, and the reality that due to the rain we receive for months on end, even if you had pasture, the horses still need more nutritional hay than we produce locally. And the mud....so much mud..
    Proud member of the "Don't rush to kill wildlife" clique!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2001
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    1,261

    Default

    Oh my god yes.

    I had no idea. No idea at all. Especially moving to Texas where there is so much space I though I'd be fine. But it is so different and it is very difficult to adjust. And yes, I'm a snot, I think it is better back east.

    I finally have my horse at a barn where he gets turnout more like back east, out on 15 acres with some hills and trees.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Location
    Lakeland, FL
    Posts
    203

    Default

    Awe Calvin, I wont hold that against ya'll. You just don't `know` better!!!
    (said tongue in cheek)
    "Gypsy gold does not chink and glitter, it gleams in the sun and neighs in the dark"



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 3, 2009
    Location
    On the buckle
    Posts
    983

    Default

    I grew up and learned to ride, owned my first horse in No Va. Now I live in So Iowa. Iowa has its pluses, but as far as horses go...need I say more?
    Mon Ogon (Mo) and Those Wer the Days (Derby)



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
    Location
    The Great, uh, Green (?!?!) North!
    Posts
    4,044

    Default

    I'm from Ontario now living in BC. Paddocks are supposed to be measured in acres, not in feet. Battling thrush shouldn't be a second hobby. Mud season should be a few weeks, not half of the year.

    And yes, I have been tossing around the idea of moving back (where I can complain about heat/humidity/snow/pollution/traffic...).
    "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."



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