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  1. #1
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    Dec. 14, 2010
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    Default various concerns regarding my ASB

    Hello,

    For a little background information:

    I am not looking at being competitive this year, maybe just later in the season have a little fun at a few local open fun shows. I am more or less just trying to keep it slow. I am gonna work on him myself and later find an eventing trainer when his advances go past my expertise, but there is only one eventing trainer in my area, and I previously had bad experiences with them. Although, I might be relocating, but I am unsure. Should I consider sending him to a trainer for a few months? Or should I try and find a trainer, when the time comes, that I can take weekly or bi-weekly lessons with?

    Until then, have any of you got any particular advice on any videos or books I could read?

    I am looking into getting a new saddle, but I've got no idea what to get. As of right now, I've only got a cheap huntseat saddle. I have seen these "all purpose" saddles, and understand that they're some kind of a jumping/dressage saddle hybrid. Are these saddles used in eventing? or are these saddles in fact POS's, like I've heard. Do eventers really need 3 different saddles?? Is this something I need to think about investing in? I would rather get a nicer used saddle that is already broke in as opposed to getting a new saddle, especially with my rather low budget. Are there any names that I should look for?

    OKay, I think this is all that I can think of atm, my apologies for my uninformed ignorance.

    Please just let me know what you guys think. Thanks in advance!

    Cheers
    Last edited by jevousaime; Jun. 2, 2011 at 09:33 AM.
    "The bare necessities of life will come to you." -The Jungle Book



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2010
    Posts
    443

    Default

    if your current saddle fits you and the horse I will be fine. I wouldn't go rushing off buying tons of equipment. I know some people who like all purpose saddles, so they are an option, but they are not my cup of tea..and no you do not need 3 saddles! your current saddle is most likely fine, but if you do want a new saddle I would go in the close contact direction..I use my CC saddle for dressage bc i hate my dressage saddle and I do just fine! If you are going to compete or do xc schooling you do need: a xc vest, astm approved helmet, a medical armband, leg boots for your horse if you choose to use them... As far a trainer, it is tough when there is no one in your area. I would suggest finding a high quality jumper trainer you can work with some just to start off jumping..as far as xc goes I know some coaches will have out of town students come in for 'minicamp' a couple days/weekend/week where you haul out to them and take lessons...just make sure you find someone with a good reputation whose students are Safe and horses seem happy doing their jobs... Most any breed of horse can be successful at the lower levels so i don't see his tail or gait being too much of a hindrance esp. if you just want to have fun. I don't know much a/b saddlebreds but is he gaited? that may be an issue bc you would need to develop a clear w/t/c... best of luck! It is a really fun sport to be involved in!



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2009
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Hi,
    My friend showed thru training with a saddlebred. She never got good dressage score, but it wasn't because of his breed. He just wasn't great at it. Good dressage is good dressage and that is all the judges care about. Just work on your basics and getting him to stretch down and forward. I would think any good dressage book would be good for him.

    Sending him to a trainer is up to you. Not knowing your background, it is hard to tell if you have the skill to teach him good dressage basics. If you don't think you can get him started well in the dressage or jumping, I would send him to a trainer. If he is started correctly, it will cut down on issues in the future. However, I would take lessons. Particularly for cross country. There is a reason eventers ride the way they do verses riding like hunters.

    As for saddles, you don't need three saddles. Many lower level riders ride is one saddle for all three phases. At some point, having a separate saddle for each phase will make is easier, but one is fine for the lower levels. Also, I have never ridden in an all purpose saddle that had the correct balance for anything. You are much better of getting a jumping saddle appropriate for cross country and stadium. You can ride dressage in a jumping saddle.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 21, 2007
    Posts
    25

    Default

    Many years ago I had an ASB that did the 3 foot hunters locally in Va. and also did eventing through Novice and dressage through 1st quite easily. He should be a lot of fun for you. Don't worry about the gaits or his tail. Just enjoy him. I know he's grateful to have found you.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
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    2,347

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah88 View Post
    . I don't know much a/b saddlebreds but is he gaited? that may be an issue bc you would need to develop a clear w/t/c... best of luck! It is a really fun sport to be involved in!
    If the horse was shown, he trots. "Gaited" saddlebreds are not the same as "gaited" horses (i.e TWH, pasos, etc). Saddlebreds shown in a [5] gaited class are required to W,T & C.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2006
    Location
    Knoxville TN
    Posts
    1,306

    Default

    No ! don't send him to a trainer - stick with him, do it yourself. You are going to need to find out all about the events that you will be doing with him in the next few years, so start going to those events right now - this year - as a volunteer. Get involved with that, get involved with pony club ( no, seriously, I'm 42 and go to pony club - go as a friendly volunteer to start with - you learn so much and meeting all the parents and instructors is invaluable). You will definitely run into the right sort of trainers and instructors at an event or a meeting, surely?

    After your first few recognised events you will probably want a dressage saddle, but wait til then. As long as your current saddle is balanced and you can do flatwork in it, stick with that. Then when you're ready, ask around on here for a good, local independent saddle-fitter - often we can save you a bunch of money if we happen to have an appropriate saddle on consignment. (Trying saddles especially in our area is miserable, and expensive, since we don't have tack stores )

    I doubt his tailset will be too much of a problem at lower levels. For what I do, at BN, you just want him to be relaxed, rhythmic, forward, accurate. You'll have all that

    You're lucky that he jumps well - mine jumps like a stag. Literally. Kerrr- Ping! All four legs off the ground at the same time, and not always in the same direction. You want to see a funny pic ?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2005
    Location
    On the Maryland Side of the Beltway
    Posts
    1,352

    Default

    The horse in my profile pic is an ASB (from 5-gaited lines) that I evented prior to his retirement due to neurologic issues. ASBs are versatile horses - and if your guy was brought up in the saddleseat world, you may just have to spend some time doing a little more work to retrain him in the ways of dressage. There's a small community of ASB-eventing folks out there - and there's a very active Yahoo group (asbsporthorse) dedicated to riding ASBs in non-saddleseat disciplines - and there are a lot of folks over there who've been through the saddleseat to dressage or eventing transition.

    If you want some motivation...check out http://www.saddlebredsarefun.com/ - it's got lots of photos of former saddleseat ASBs doing their new jobs in different disciplines!
    ~Drafties Clique~Sprite's Mom~ASB-loving eventer~
    www.gianthorse.photoreflect.com ~ http://photobucket.com/albums/v692/tarheelmd07/



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2010
    Location
    planet earth ;)
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah88 View Post
    if your current saddle fits you and the horse I will be fine. I wouldn't go rushing off buying tons of equipment. I know some people who like all purpose saddles, so they are an option, but they are not my cup of tea..and no you do not need 3 saddles! your current saddle is most likely fine, but if you do want a new saddle I would go in the close contact direction..I use my CC saddle for dressage bc i hate my dressage saddle and I do just fine! If you are going to compete or do xc schooling you do need: a xc vest, astm approved helmet, a medical armband, leg boots for your horse if you choose to use them... As far a trainer, it is tough when there is no one in your area. I would suggest finding a high quality jumper trainer you can work with some just to start off jumping..as far as xc goes I know some coaches will have out of town students come in for 'minicamp' a couple days/weekend/week where you haul out to them and take lessons...just make sure you find someone with a good reputation whose students are Safe and horses seem happy doing their jobs... Most any breed of horse can be successful at the lower levels so i don't see his tail or gait being too much of a hindrance esp. if you just want to have fun. I don't know much a/b saddlebreds but is he gaited? that may be an issue bc you would need to develop a clear w/t/c... best of luck! It is a really fun sport to be involved in!
    Thank you for your reply! This makes me quite relieved. Not all Saddlebreds are gaited. In fact, the majority aren't ever taught how to gait. The gaited ones typically have a different line breeding, too.

    For my boy, his breeding is actually mixed, and he was born with a 3 gaited way of going. He was never gaited. He has a very strong trot! I need to get vids of him up here ^^

    May I ask what a medical armband is???
    "The bare necessities of life will come to you." -The Jungle Book



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 15, 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    136

    Default

    It's a little card with your medical details (blood type, allergies, emergency contact info) that slips into a holder on a band that goes around your arm when you're doing XC. They're required at most events/levels (and recommended for all).

    I've known a few eventing ASBs, and they seem really cool. I'm sure you'll have fun with your guy!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2005
    Location
    On the Maryland Side of the Beltway
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    1,352

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jevousaime View Post
    May I ask what a medical armband is???
    Here's an example
    http://www.bitofbritain.com/ProductD...uctCode=002805
    you have to wear it during jumping phases at events (well, all recognized events...and most unrecognized ones I've been too) - it has your name/emergency contact info/medical info on the little card that fits in the plastic sleeve...lets medical personel get all your info quickly and easily in the event of an emergency
    ~Drafties Clique~Sprite's Mom~ASB-loving eventer~
    www.gianthorse.photoreflect.com ~ http://photobucket.com/albums/v692/tarheelmd07/



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 1999
    Location
    Midland, NC, USA
    Posts
    7,234

    Default

    A student of mine evented a Saddlebred.... he rarely did well in dressage, but it wasn't lack of ability.... he spent the first couple of years with his owner completely being in charge, as in "I'm going to stand in the middle of the ring and kick/rear/buck until you quit asking me to move" and he was a belligerent jerk who never quite got over himself, and his owner never quite got over it either.... she had a tendency to back off and give in. A couple of times I rode him at shows and he got pretty good scores, but you had to spend the first five minutes ploqinf through the cr*p he usually put over on his owner, and he was strong and determined. But he was capable of settling down and putting in a good test.

    Jennifer



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
    Location
    Nokesville, VA
    Posts
    35,080

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jevousaime View Post
    May I ask what a medical armband is???
    Here is a link to the Mecical card
    http://www.useventing.com/resources/...dicalCards.pdf

    Download it, print it out, and fill it in. Then you need to put it inside a clear, waterproof holder, on your arm, outside your clothing.

    You can get an purpose-made armband to hold it, from USEA, BoB, or any one of a number of other places.

    Here is the actual rule.

    EV113.2. MEDICAL CARDS. An approved and completed medical card is required any time while
    jumping. It must be enclosed in a transparent, waterproof carrier. It must be securely
    attached to the competitor’s upper arm on the outside of the competitor’s clothing. It must
    include any relevant medical history, injury (particularly to the head), drug allergies and current
    medication. Athletes are responsible to record all injuries on the card. Failure to wear
    one’s own medical card shall be penalized by a fine of $100. (Payable to the Organizing
    Committee)
    It is a good idea to stick a copy of your insurance card in there too.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2010
    Location
    planet earth ;)
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KateWooten View Post
    No ! don't send him to a trainer - stick with him, do it yourself. You are going to need to find out all about the events that you will be doing with him in the next few years, so start going to those events right now - this year - as a volunteer. Get involved with that, get involved with pony club ( no, seriously, I'm 42 and go to pony club - go as a friendly volunteer to start with - you learn so much and meeting all the parents and instructors is invaluable). You will definitely run into the right sort of trainers and instructors at an event or a meeting, surely?

    After your first few recognised events you will probably want a dressage saddle, but wait til then. As long as your current saddle is balanced and you can do flatwork in it, stick with that. Then when you're ready, ask around on here for a good, local independent saddle-fitter - often we can save you a bunch of money if we happen to have an appropriate saddle on consignment. (Trying saddles especially in our area is miserable, and expensive, since we don't have tack stores )

    I doubt his tailset will be too much of a problem at lower levels. For what I do, at BN, you just want him to be relaxed, rhythmic, forward, accurate. You'll have all that

    You're lucky that he jumps well - mine jumps like a stag. Literally. Kerrr- Ping! All four legs off the ground at the same time, and not always in the same direction. You want to see a funny pic ?
    These are such great ideas! So are you suggesting that aside from volunteering and getting into the "culture," that I jut find a trainer to work with whenever I am ready? I think weekly adjustments make sense, and maybe a professional telling me what I should look into working on, etc. Plus, constructive criticism is good, yes?

    Regarding his jumping, at first, he seems quite timid at anything new. But every day I ride him, he learns more and more often to trust me and think in my head instead of his own. I think it is a great characteristic of his. He has a beautiful jump, and really gets those knees up!
    "The bare necessities of life will come to you." -The Jungle Book



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2010
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    planet earth ;)
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ThirdCharm View Post
    A student of mine evented a Saddlebred.... he rarely did well in dressage, but it wasn't lack of ability.... he spent the first couple of years with his owner completely being in charge, as in "I'm going to stand in the middle of the ring and kick/rear/buck until you quit asking me to move" and he was a belligerent jerk who never quite got over himself, and his owner never quite got over it either.... she had a tendency to back off and give in. A couple of times I rode him at shows and he got pretty good scores, but you had to spend the first five minutes ploqinf through the cr*p he usually put over on his owner, and he was strong and determined. But he was capable of settling down and putting in a good test.

    Jennifer

    Saddlebreds are really easy to spoil! LOL. they definitely have a mind of their own. You can tell if you go to an ASB show. So many horses screw up in the ring because they're just plain bored. W/T/C round and round a ring is way to easy for this breed. You can definitely tell if they aren't trained properly IMO.
    "The bare necessities of life will come to you." -The Jungle Book



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2010
    Location
    planet earth ;)
    Posts
    96

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tarheelmd07 View Post
    The horse in my profile pic is an ASB (from 5-gaited lines) that I evented prior to his retirement due to neurologic issues. ASBs are versatile horses - and if your guy was brought up in the saddleseat world, you may just have to spend some time doing a little more work to retrain him in the ways of dressage. There's a small community of ASB-eventing folks out there - and there's a very active Yahoo group (asbsporthorse) dedicated to riding ASBs in non-saddleseat disciplines - and there are a lot of folks over there who've been through the saddleseat to dressage or eventing transition.

    If you want some motivation...check out http://www.saddlebredsarefun.com/ - it's got lots of photos of former saddleseat ASBs doing their new jobs in different disciplines!
    I have ran across that website, but never really looked at it in detail. Thanks for the reminder!!

    Your horse looks great at xc! Your pic and the pics from the website certainly have given me inspiration. Thanks!
    "The bare necessities of life will come to you." -The Jungle Book



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
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    5,786

    Default

    With the dressage basics mentioned multiple times, I just want to reiterate the stretching forward/down which was mentioned. You'll be surprised - his neck will actually change shape from correct long and forward stretching! That will also help build up his topline and help him move in a way which will make everything else you do easier for him.

    He sounds like a neat horse who is lucky to have found you! Good luck with him - and please post videos!
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 22, 2000
    Location
    passepartout
    Posts
    10,034

    Default

    I have an ASB mix -- he's SB x Belgian x TB -- who foxhunted for eons, evented to P and was also an excellent showjumper up to 4'.

    He has a very high head carriage and this is how he goes. I just focused on the parts of his body that actually mattered. But that also meant accepting that his dressage scores were not going to be good (he was extravagantly uninterested in dressage). He was very well-schooled, however, and placed well at T and above because he was so good in the jumping phases.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2010
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    planet earth ;)
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by netg View Post
    With the dressage basics mentioned multiple times, I just want to reiterate the stretching forward/down which was mentioned. You'll be surprised - his neck will actually change shape from correct long and forward stretching! That will also help build up his topline and help him move in a way which will make everything else you do easier for him.

    He sounds like a neat horse who is lucky to have found you! Good luck with him - and please post videos!
    Thanks for letting me know how important stretching forward! Can you think of any particular exercises or training techniques I could do that might particularly help him?

    I will do my best to post a vid soon. unfortunately my time and laziness gets far too out of control a lot of times, especially in the winter when I should be hibernating! LOL.
    "The bare necessities of life will come to you." -The Jungle Book



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2001
    Posts
    5,106

    Default

    Also check out www.discovereventing.com - there's LOTS of answers to your questions there about what you might need and to learn about the sport! You might also consider joining USEA (www.useventing.com) - even if you're not going to compete recognized there's a non-competing membership that gets you access to their super magazine which has a ton of helpful information in it plus great articles so you can start learning about the sport.

    And seriously, the sport's about all sorts of horses! There's this very cool ASB who is the prettiest palomino/roan/rust color - I can't describe it but it's gorgeous - who is going Novice or Training in Area II and who does a really lovely job.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2010
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    planet earth ;)
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GotSpots View Post
    Also check out www.discovereventing.com - there's LOTS of answers to your questions there about what you might need and to learn about the sport! You might also consider joining USEA (www.useventing.com) - even if you're not going to compete recognized there's a non-competing membership that gets you access to their super magazine which has a ton of helpful information in it plus great articles so you can start learning about the sport.

    And seriously, the sport's about all sorts of horses! There's this very cool ASB who is the prettiest palomino/roan/rust color - I can't describe it but it's gorgeous - who is going Novice or Training in Area II and who does a really lovely job.
    SO helpful of you! Thanks!

    My horse also has an interesting color.... from afar he looks like a bay, but then you noticed he doesn't have the black bay horse stockings. Then when you get not so far away from him you noticed that his mane and tail is some kind of black flaxen. The black does however overtake the white streaks, but they are definitely noticeable! But look black at first. I am not sure how to classify it LOL.
    "The bare necessities of life will come to you." -The Jungle Book



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