The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 31
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2010
    Posts
    15

    Default OTTB Detox

    I have had my mare since June and shes been doing great up until a little over a month ago.

    She dropped about 100 lbs so we upped her grain and hay and since then she has been about jumping out of her skin at the slightest sound. She wont leave the pasture gate and go to the herd she wants to hang right by the gate and sometimes walk up and down the fence near the barn.

    We are dropping her grain again but I was told she might be coming off track drugs. I just wanted opinions on if the drugs could have lasted that long in her system?

    This all started around the same time, the weight loss and the odd behavior during turn out. Shes still the same sweet mare in the barn for grooming and tacking and good in the arena, shes just odd when shes turned out.

    Two weeks ago she jumped the fence and a few days ago a horse decided to kick up his heels and take off...he spooked her so bad she ran in a blind panic into the gate posts 2 times before we could calm her. Sorry this is kinda rambled. Any advice or help would be greatly appreciated.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2007
    Location
    Down on the Farm
    Posts
    3,056

    Default

    First of all, what are you feeding? There are better ways to put weight on a horse than feeding large amounts of grain. Saying you upped her hay leaves me suspicious. Horses should have access to hay or some type of forage 24/7.

    Second, you've had this mare for quite some time, so everything is out of her system.

    Have you had her on an ulcer med? Most horses coming off the track will have ulcers.

    Are you giving her a probiotic?

    You could also try turning her out with just one other horse that she gets along with for awhile and see if that helps.

    My last suggestion would be having blood pulled.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2010
    Posts
    15

    Default

    I board where they get hay at night and are turned out full time during the day on grass....there isnt much left out there so I'm not happy with that situation.

    I have not had her on anything other than her hay and grain..shes on a sweet feed and was getting 8lbs during the summer and barn owner moved her up to 12lbs a day which makes me nervous. I've never had a horse that needed that much grain even when in full time work.

    Again her attitude is normal when in hand unless something spooks her and then she takes a while to come back down from the spook.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    20,140

    Default

    That is an insane amount of feed. Perhaps you need a nutritionist to get you through this rough spot. A low carb feed with a ration balancer is my go to. Add in some BOSS and free choice hay and you are usually good to go. If not, its time for a gastrogard trial. And no, she is not detoxing. If anything she needs to detox from all the sugar in her diet.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,455

    Default

    I would definitely lose the sweet feed. Those are packed with starch and that's what makes horses hot. If your girl is getting 12 lb/day no wonder she's jumping out of her skin.

    I agree with the suggestion of a low starch feed & ration balancer. My own TB gets alfalfa pellets, a ration balancer and beet pulp. when he needed more calories, he got oil. I also feed him free choice hay.

    He was very "hot" when I got him; changing his diet helped a lot.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,586

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    That is an insane amount of feed. Perhaps you need a nutritionist to get you through this rough spot. A low carb feed with a ration balancer is my go to. Add in some BOSS and free choice hay and you are usually good to go. If not, its time for a gastrogard trial. And no, she is not detoxing. If anything she needs to detox from all the sugar in her diet.
    I agree. Even at the TRACK, 12 lbs is a lot.

    I would agree she is probably nervous about turnout, getting way too much grain and not enough hay, and might have ulcers, too, meaning turnout with little/no forage is exacerbating the issue. Lucky didn't get any special meds/diet when he came off the track last winter, and didn't really need anything (except a bit more grain than the non-TBs he lives with!) because the barn feeds free-choice hay all day and fills the mangers when they come in at night, so there's always 'browse' in front of them. He's a calm horse by nature anyway, even on a track diet, but his stomach adjusted much more easily having hay in front of him 24/7.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2007
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    113

    Default

    I second the beet pulp combined with a complete feed. I would also suggest a powerpac de-worming for the weight loss.

    Also, just a thought so don't be insulted if it's not the case but is she comfy temperature wise? I have had horses off the track that get too hot/buggy or too cold when retired and want to come in therefore running the fenceline. They are used to being pampered. That would explain the weight loss from trying to keep warm and the fact that she is just starting the behavior now that the weather has changed.....



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 31, 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,997

    Default

    Thirding the beet pulp and complete feed. Twelve pounds? Holy moly.

    A complete feed with roughage would be best. And try pellets, no sweet feed. She might pick at it for a day or two because her crack candy is missing from the feed bucket, but she will come around and eat it.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2010
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Thanks so much for all the advice!

    I was wondering myself about her just not liking the cold so she was doubled up on her blankets and she got too hot so shes back to her heavy blanket again.

    Shes moving to a new barn soon where I will control the feed she gets better than where she is now and will move her to a pellet feed and beat pulp! Thanks so much for all the advice.

    In all my years of owning horses and working around them she is the first to ever do this or need that much feed...though imo she needs more hay since there is no grass in the pasture

    Again thank you for the help! Hopefully once the weathers nice we can start riding again and see you guys at the shows



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2010
    Posts
    15

    Default

    and just so you can see who I'm talking about

    http://s151.photobucket.com/albums/s...nt=Rosalie.jpg

    Rose Nov 2009 at Charles Town with trainer



    This August at the farm

    http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s...uster/rose.jpg

    http://i151.photobucket.com/albums/s...buster/001.jpg



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2000
    Location
    wishing I were anywhere but here
    Posts
    798

    Default

    I would really have her scoped for ulcers, up her hay and change her feed to something that's more calorie dense and low sugar/nscs.
    \"In all manners of opinion, our adversaries are insane.\" Mark Twain



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 17, 2002
    Location
    West Point, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    1,346

    Default

    Something to think about too...I have a mare who is tough to keep weight on. In the warmer months when our grass is good, she blooms and gets really fat (out from 6pm to 8am) but does still get hay and grain while inside. When the grass dies off, so does her weight. Adjustments in feed/hay are the key and keeping her stress level down (she's a weaver too).
    I had a lot of luck using the ration balancer made my Progressive feeds as well as adding their fat supplement called "Envision." The actual amount of feed diminishes a LOT which is much healthier per feeding (I fed 3x per day) and it is much easier on the stomach. Remember, horses can only hold about 4 pounds in their stomach.
    Another additional option would be to see if your barn would put a round bale out so she has something to munch on anytime she wants.
    Someone suggested giving her just one turn out buddy for a while. That has also worked for me. Put them together for a few weeks to bond and then introduce both horses to a larger herd together. Good luck!
    RIP Spider Murphy 4/20/02 - 10/31/10



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    19,413

    Default

    We feed TC Senior and a good timothy or timothy/alfalfa mix. Stuff her full of hay and lose the sweet feed. She probably does has ulcers by this point. Poor thing.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2007
    Location
    Down on the Farm
    Posts
    3,056

    Default

    Also be wary of just any pelleted feed. For my OTTB's I feed Triple Crown Complete, and they all get added Rice Bran in the winter along with BOSS. My QH who tends to tie up is fed Triple Crown Low Starch, and again with added RB during the colder months. They are out roughly 7 hours a day with access to hay in the winter. My 24 yr old retired BM eats Triple Crown Senior, yea, I'm a fan of the TC brand.

    Just remember too that a stall is a secure place for many off the track horses, being inside is something that they're used to. I'm not saying to stall her more, and hopefully at the new barn she will at least have a run in to hang out in when outside.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 25, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    309

    Default

    I think you've gotten some great advice. Agreed that that amount of grain seems quite high, especially sweet feed! Yikes. In addition to beet pulp, my OTTB gelding has done well on Haystretcher pellets so that may be something to keep in mind. Also, she may not be used to the extensive turnout which might be upping the nervousness factor.

    My OTTB was a 'stall baby' when I first got him. It took a bit of patience for him to realize that outside was just as fun as inside. Now, years later, he has in/out access and probably splits his time.

    Shes a beautiful girl. Good luck with her.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2007
    Location
    South Jersey
    Posts
    113

    Default Ulcers

    I personally don't scope for ulcers. I just treat them for a few days and see if I notice a difference in the horse. I have had success with generic omeprazole paste from my vet. It can be as cheap as $5 per day. Of course gastro guard is supposed to be the best but I have had horses turn into different horses after three days of this.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2005
    Location
    upstate New York
    Posts
    3,403

    Default

    OP, your girl is very, very pretty. Thanks for giving an OTTB a chance, for which you will be amply rewarded!

    It can't hurt to treat her for ulcers and I agree with sdressage that it's okay to assume that she has them, which many performance horses (not only racehorses) have. There are some who sprinkle a bit of baking soda in their feed and swear by it.

    Check her teeth as well if you haven't already done so.

    I'm a racetracker and have TBs. While they're wintering and on R and R I am constantly monitoring their feeding regimen. I have one big gelding who came to me sour and poor looking and it took me forever (well, at least 9 months) to put weight on him to the point that I'm satisfied. He gets high fat sweet feed and lots of good quality timothy/alfalfa hay. The quantity and quality of hay is, IMHO, what has made the difference.

    I also have a Tomorrow's Cat filly who is a little tank with a ton of 'tude and verve. She gets very little feed and plenty of the same good quality hay that the gelding gets and she is a round little spitfire.

    If your girl's grass is not adequate, she needs plenty-o'-hay! Good stuff. As everyone else has suggested and you have agreed, the amount of sf is turning her into a ticking bomb and the excess energy it creates is defeating the purpose of putting good weight on her. If she were in heavy work, it might be different (and that's why racehorses can benefit by this type of feeding regimen when they're competing).

    I think you're on the right track and will figure her out once you get her into a situation that enables you to dictate her feeding regimen.

    Good luck!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 25, 2010
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by foundationmare View Post
    OP, your girl is very, very pretty. Thanks for giving an OTTB a chance, for which you will be amply rewarded!

    It can't hurt to treat her for ulcers and I agree with sdressage that it's okay to assume that she has them, which many performance horses (not only racehorses) have. There are some who sprinkle a bit of baking soda in their feed and swear by it.

    Check her teeth as well if you haven't already done so.

    I'm a racetracker and have TBs. While they're wintering and on R and R I am constantly monitoring their feeding regimen. I have one big gelding who came to me sour and poor looking and it took me forever (well, at least 9 months) to put weight on him to the point that I'm satisfied. He gets high fat sweet feed and lots of good quality timothy/alfalfa hay. The quantity and quality of hay is, IMHO, what has made the difference.

    I also have a Tomorrow's Cat filly who is a little tank with a ton of 'tude and verve. She gets very little feed and plenty of the same good quality hay that the gelding gets and she is a round little spitfire.

    If your girl's grass is not adequate, she needs plenty-o'-hay! Good stuff. As everyone else has suggested and you have agreed, the amount of sf is turning her into a ticking bomb and the excess energy it creates is defeating the purpose of putting good weight on her. If she were in heavy work, it might be different (and that's why racehorses can benefit by this type of feeding regimen when they're competing).

    I think you're on the right track and will figure her out once you get her into a situation that enables you to dictate her feeding regimen.

    Good luck!
    Thanks I absolutely love her and want to make sure I'm doing things right by her. I got her in June off Charles Town and we had a great summer and fall together this winter is giving me a run for my money lol. I've had horses before but none of them ever ran into this type of issue...aka my other mare never got injured or had any issue with feed...let her look at the grain and she'd gain like 500 lbs lol

    I'm wondering if she also isnt happy with her current boarding stable. She is going to a trainer in about 2 months and hopefully with the change in her feeding program she will be happier at the trainers stable and once shes done there her new barn will have just 5 other horses and ample pasture so fingers crossed she will be happier at a new barn. She is a very smart girl and trys her best to tell me what shes thinking at all times even when I'm riding her



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2001
    Location
    Ft Worth, TX, USA
    Posts
    3,954

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sjdressage View Post
    I personally don't scope for ulcers. I just treat them for a few days and see if I notice a difference in the horse. I have had success with generic omeprazole paste from my vet. It can be as cheap as $5 per day. Of course gastro guard is supposed to be the best but I have had horses turn into different horses after three days of this.
    I've never scoped for ulcers either, but I've treated, and had good results with ranitidine.
    http://www.ehow.com/about_6580625_ra...rs-horses.html
    With the lastest OTTB I did a 30 day treatment with ranitidine (30days for $80.00), and since then I've given him aloe vera juice as a daily supplement and I give him Succeed paste whenever we go on overnight trips.

    I agree with the above opinions on cutting out the "sweet feed". I feed Ultium to the ones I'm riding/competing.
    "Everyone will start to cheer, when you put on your sailin shoes"-Lowell George

    What's the status on Tuco?



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
    Posts
    8,455

    Default

    Alfalfa has been shown in several studies to both prevent and cure ulcers. I have been feeding my ulcer-prone TB alfalfa (either pellets, cubes or hay) ever since. He does really, really well on it.

    Good luck with your girl, she's lovely!
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



Similar Threads

  1. Detox diet for horses/forage only diet
    By Beethoven in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: Sep. 5, 2011, 10:04 AM
  2. OTTB: how long to detox?
    By TheHorseProblem in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: May. 20, 2010, 04:01 PM
  3. Replies: 8
    Last Post: Jul. 15, 2009, 11:52 PM
  4. Replies: 7
    Last Post: Jun. 16, 2009, 10:44 AM
  5. Do you 'detox' your horses?
    By LMH in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 45
    Last Post: Oct. 27, 2008, 04:30 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •