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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2006
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    Seattle area
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    Default Giant Schnauzer anyone?

    I'm researching breeds as I realize that I really need a farm dog. His/her job would be to be a good watchdog me and the critters on the farm.

    Anyone have any experience with
    one? Would love to know the good and
    the bad. The AKC website has some info, but the breeder websites I've visited are much more about conformation showing than working ability.

    many thanks



  2. #2
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    Oct. 9, 2000
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    Oregon, sitting on my couch looking out the window at a mountain
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    Default

    I've grown up with miniature and standard schnauzers - not really the same but I have loved those two breeds. From what I've heard of the giants they are very strong in body and brain and require a confident and firm handler.



  3. #3
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    Dec. 21, 2010
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    Down South
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    My aunt had one when I was younger, and he was intelligent, did obedience school and was perfectly trained, but he was SO energetic. It was almost like a Jack Russell terrier on speed.
    The dude abides ...



  4. #4
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    Mar. 7, 2003
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    I work with a couple of giants. I love them but they are intense! The older of the two took a bit to warm up to me, he's very bonded with his owner and sort of aloof/wary of strangers but not aggressive...excellent watch dog. The younger is much more in your face, and absolutely fearless. Both are wonderfully obedient.



  5. #5
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    Feb. 15, 2007
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    often between a rock and hard place in Ky
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    I had a friend that had one, nice but very intense dog and lots and lots of energy. I have a Standard Poodle and he is an awesome barn dog. He is 70 lbs, easy to care for when clipped short, respectful of the horses, great with my kids, and protective of me. Most who see him are a bit intimidated just by his size and they are naturally reserved around strangers. For his people though is an absolute clown. He also doesn't realize he is so big so he wants to be a lapdog
    ___._/> I don't suffer from insanity.. I enjoy every
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  6. #6
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    the guy I worked for got one after his Bernese died.

    It was an adult male, unaltered, MASSIVE dog. Extremely athletic with a bark to chill you to the bone. While reasonably friendly, not a dog you'd want to meet in a dark alley, or getting on his bad side.

    Last I heard he got some friends of his kind...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  7. #7
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    Dec. 21, 2010
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    Funny enough, my old trainer had a large, white standard poodle as a 'barn dog.' (He was a champion stud.) And believe it or not, he was great at the barn, around the horses, etc. I didn't want to mention it, because it sounds like such an odd suggestion. But since horse-loverz mentioned it, I thought I'd help back them up.
    The dude abides ...



  8. #8
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by Opus1 View Post
    Funny enough, my old trainer had a large, white standard poodle as a 'barn dog.' (He was a champion stud.) And believe it or not, he was great at the barn, around the horses, etc. I didn't want to mention it, because it sounds like such an odd suggestion. But since horse-loverz mentioned it, I thought I'd help back them up.
    Just because old unsatisfied women put a ridiculous haircut on these poor beasties does not make them bad dogs!
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  9. #9
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    Apr. 29, 2006
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    Evansville, Wisconsin
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    My husband grew up with one, and his family loved it. I was not terribly impressed, but I'm sure a lot of that was flaky handling on his parents part. Chased cars all the time, and would try to chew on your tires even while you were driving, which was the most obnoxious habit.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seattle area
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    Default

    Thanks for the heads up about the standard poodle--hadn't thought of this breed as being protective of family and other critters....will research this them as well. Also interested in a Dobie, but while the dog will live inside, it will be outside a lot with me and we are in the PNW--LOTS of rain--am wondering if the Dobie would just be too cold....



  11. #11
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    Feb. 15, 2007
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    often between a rock and hard place in Ky
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    I will say too that my Poodle is very calm in the house not hyper at all. And is very very patient with my daughter when she plays "catch me with your toy" as they run circles (she runs he does a slow easy trot ) and he patiently waits for his "turn" for the toy. . and Poodles don't shed... at all
    Oddly people are pretty intimated by my Poodle, I guess it's his size, the fact he is solid black which makes the teeth look ever so much bigger, and he has a VERY non-foo foo I mean business bark (when he decides to use it).
    ___._/> I don't suffer from insanity.. I enjoy every
    ____/ minute of it! Member stick horse art lovers
    ';;;;;;; clique
    //__\\<-- Don't feed the llama!



  12. #12
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    Dec. 30, 2009
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    The Great Plains of Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Friesianfan View Post
    Also interested in a Dobie, but while the dog will live inside, it will be outside a lot with me and we are in the PNW--LOTS of rain--am wondering if the Dobie would just be too cold....
    There's always the option of a coat! My Dobe was always out with me everywhere and now that my ex has her, he has her out with him at work 100 percent of the time as well (she's the official mascot ) - he works long hours outside. Mine always just spurted around to keep warm. Sometimes we put a coat on her though and I know the ex babies her a bit that way; I think she might even have a couple coats We're in the Great White North, so it gets pretty cold LOVE(d) my Dobe!

    That said, Dobies require a strong leader too and they are VERY high energy. Extremely loyal "velcro" dogs though and decent protection but more bark than bite. Thanks to the movies though most people won't test a Dobe but they wouldn't exactly be at the top of my list for protection; a German Shepherd or a Husky/Wolf would (the latter is an amazing family dog!!! GS too but I find they require a LOT of leadership). Right now I've actually got a Redbone Coonhound x Rottie (sorry that photo was taken back last summer - she is filling out quite a bit now, but it gives you an idea) who is very quiet, only medium-energy, very much a natural follower, good in the cold (she just moves around more), and VERY protective (BUT, when I ask her to back down, she immediately does, without question). She is very aware of her surroundings and if ANYTHING is amiss, she's on top of it, but still checking in with me for guidance. I actually feel MORE secure with her as a guard dog. She is phenomenal with the horses, kids, etc. So, I think a Rottie x (crossed with something with more "follower" tendencies like the BC or Coonhound or such) is something I would again consider in the future.

    Of course a lot of it has to do with how you raise your dog, but certain dogs and certain breeds will definitely have certain tendencies. Keep in mind higher energy dogs will require a higher level of leadership...honestly evaluate your needs and pick something with an appropriate energy level, etc.
    Last edited by naturalequus; Jan. 17, 2011 at 01:52 PM.
    ....horses should be trained in such a way that they not only love their riders, but look forward to the time they are with them.
    ~ Xenophon, 350 B.C.



  13. #13
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    Apr. 10, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    the guy I worked for got one after his Bernese died.

    It was an adult male, unaltered, MASSIVE dog. Extremely athletic with a bark to chill you to the bone. While reasonably friendly, not a dog you'd want to meet in a dark alley, or getting on his bad side.

    Last I heard he got some friends of his kind...
    The only dog I've ever been truly afraid of was an ex-boyfriend's Giant Schnauzer. That dog was SCARY when it barked. She was actually a pretty cool dog once you got to know her but for the first six months I was pretty taken aback by her! If I ever wanted a dog to deter people I'd definitely consider one of these, even over some of the more traditional "guard dog" types.
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.



  14. #14
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    Mar. 17, 2003
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    North Texas, US
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    I had minis growing up and when my last one passed, I wanted a big dog to take to the barn and thought I wanted a Giant. I did a lot of research, talked to a number of local people who have them and visited three homes with them. I found them extremely energetic, almost hyper. But the deciding factor for me is that they are same sex aggressive. We still had a female mini amercian eskimo and I wanted another female and was told in no uncertain terms that the Giant bitch would at some point try to kill the mini. Was told that you just kept one kenneled all the time...well, that just doesn't work for me.

    So, I went back to the drawing board and discovered the Black Russian Terrier which at the time was being approved by the AKC and put into the Working Group. They all go back to one Giant male with 16 other breeds added in over time. We imported Kiya almost 7 yrs. ago (there were only about 500 in the US at the time) from Kiev. From the get go, she has been the BEST dog I've ever had. She is my barn manager and takes her job very seriously. She had one litter and put up with maternity leave and then was ready to go back to work. She gets very irritated with me when it's really muddy out and I make her and her son (Tank, which is a very appropriate name!) stay in the house.

    She loves the foals the most and will help the mares clean them up! She also helps me enforce the barn rules. If there are horses fussing over the fence, she is right there telling them to cut it out!

    BRTs want to be with their people, not leave them outside dogs, and need to be socialized and trained when young. Do this, and you'll have a super dog and companion.

    Kiya has traveled cross country with me twice and loves to go to PetsMart, Tractor Supply and Home Depot!

    If you're willing to put the early work in (training and socialization), then I highly recommend them.
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  15. #15
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    Feb. 18, 2005
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    Oh! Cyriz! So THAT is what they are called! There is a man who brings his four (!!) to the dog park. Boy are they *beautiful* but I would certainly not want to meet on in a back ally - in in broad daylight!

    Very sweet though - one of his females always trots right over and sits at my left side. Every. time. He says that is very unusual for her - I guess I give good scratches : )

    OP - Is your dog going to be inside with you? If so, maybe the Dobe's short hair could be an advantage, as he/she would not take hours to dry, as a Schnauzer might...



  16. #16
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    Mar. 10, 2009
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    My dad and stepmother have always had Standard Schnauzers - they're around 50-60 lbs.
    GREAT dogs, very trainable and strongly family-oriented, though the males seem to be a bit more level-headed than the females.

    They had one, named McGee, who was my all-time fave. Dad would tell McGee, "don't touch my hat!" and McGee would jump up and grab the hat off Dad's head!

    If I'm not mistaken - the Giant Schnauzer is a totally distinct breed apart from the mini and standard - no real relation other than that they're all dogs?



  17. #17
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    Mar. 9, 2006
    Location
    Ontario
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    My boyfriend has one, and I think he's fantastic (the dog, not the guy... the guy's pretty great too though ).

    Definitely a testy breed from what I've seen, you have to be very consistent with them. You need to make a really solid effort to socialize them a lot early on with both people and other dogs.

    Manners are important as they are a large, high energy, powerful dog who can get out of hand if not handled correctly.

    That being said, my bf has done a great job with his. He is a polite, obedient boy, with a lot of love and personality. Loves kids, and is great with other dogs. Part of this might be because he gets a ton of exercise on a daily basis. 1-2 straight hours worth of running while my boyfriend trains.

    Oddly enough, I've personally been looking into getting a standard poodle for the past couple months. My neighbour breeds them, and I've been in love ever since meeting his "pack".



  18. #18
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    Nov. 13, 2007
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    NW Louisiana
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    I will third the standard poodle idea. I knew one that was absolutely the best barn dog ever. He would sit in the arena, like a statue, while his owner rode circles around him. Very friendly, but would steal your lunch if he could get to it. Just an awesome dog.



  19. #19
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    Feb. 23, 1999
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    I think the very first and most important question you must ask yourself is:

    What kind of handler am I? Be honest.

    Are you strong and confident and disciplined? Or do you tend to be more lackadasical and permissive? Are you brave or tend to be timid? Are you willing to put in lots of hours for proper training or do you just want to rely on the dog's instincts? Are you willing to give a dog the exercise it needs or want to hope it takes care of those needs itself?

    Some breeds (Giant Schnauze is just one of them) require LOTS of training by a confident, skilled and brave handler in order for you to get the best out of them without them sort of "taking over." They are AWESOME dogs, but require the right person to handle them.

    Other breeds tend to be a bit more laid back and will naturally be a bit protective without being particularly dangerous. Standard Poodle, GSD, Goldens, Rotties (although the Rotties DOES need someone to teach it boundaries) require less committed work from the owner/handler.
    Visit Sonesta Farms website at www.sonestafarms.com or our FaceBook page at www.facebook.com/sonestafarms. Also showing & breeding Cavalier King Charles Spaniels.



  20. #20
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Best point yet!

    Too much trouble is caused by handlers and dogs not being compatible.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



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