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  1. #1
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    Jun. 15, 2002
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    Default Sand Colic Prevention

    Okay, so if psyllium does nothing than what can you do? From what I read, the best thing you can do is feed them hay to keep it all moving through.

    Saw a necropsy on a horse last night that had a huge sand impaction its large colon. It was a big nasty impaction to say the least. Thankfully it wasn't a horse that lived on this property, but lived on similar pastures.

    In this area of FL, its kinda impossible to not have sand turnouts. I try to give enough hay that they always hay 24/7 especially if they live outside. I try to always give them something to munch on so they don't actively eat the sand, but I realize that they still pick up sand off the ground when eating the hay.

    So what do you do to prevent sand colic?

    TIA


    Opinions and thoughts?
    Last edited by Beethoven; Jan. 16, 2011 at 11:10 PM. Reason: Whoops meant colon not intestine...late night and early morning
    I love cats, I love every single cat....
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  2. #2
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    Default

    Who says psyllium doesn't do anything?

    whole flax seed is quite useful - as it gets wet it turns gelatinous, which is great for capturing things and moving it along.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  3. #3
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Who says psyllium doesn't do anything?

    whole flax seed is quite useful - as it gets wet it turns gelatinous, which is great for capturing things and moving it along.
    Most of the studies done on the product.

    What about one thar is allergic to flax?
    I love cats, I love every single cat....
    So anyway I am a cat lover
    And I love to run.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2011
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    In Washington with my little quackers
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    Default

    Pysillium(sp) has always worked for my horses, especially my older mare, no matter what the studies say.



  5. #5
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Default

    http://www.j-evs.com/article/S0737-0...015-4/abstract
    Daily supplementation with a probiotic, prebiotic, and psyllium supplement demonstrated enhanced fecal sand clearance in clinically normal horses.
    (though it's noted more studies are needed)

    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...713.x/abstract
    all horses showed a higher total ash output within the 5 days treatment period when the psyllium semen and mineral oil were used for the treatment than when treated with mineral oil solely.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3209452
    Four horses with diarrhea had radiographic evidence of large quantities of sand in the gastrointestinal tract. Initially, none of the horses had sufficient fecal sand quantity to suggest sand enteropathy. Diarrhea resolved in all horses within 2 days of oral administration of psyllium hydrophilic mucilloid. Historically, all 4 horses had lost weight or had difficulty maintaining weight. After treatment was administered, the horses either gained weight or were easier to maintain in good condition.
    Seems to be at least lightly proven TO work?
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 7, 2010
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    Default

    All psyllium fiber turns gelatinous when wet.

    Just don't waste your money on Metamucil. Myself and someone over on the Flahorse board figured out the dosage of fiber in both a human grade (Metamucil) product and a horse grade product and the numbers were so much higher in the horse grade product, that you'd have to use a butt load of Met to be anywhere near that number, which would defeat the whole purpose of getting Met (it is supposedly cheaper) in the first place.

    I don't really believe in psyllium products myself. I believe in feeding lots of hay. If you feed lots of hay (or at least what is recommended), with most horses, you won't need a psyllium product.

    However, that being said, when I had my TWH the first time, she was not getting a whole lot of hay. So, every now and again, she would get diarrhea, I would give her the psyllium horse grade product, and she would clear up.

    So, I guess they DO work- but there is no reason to do them if you are feeding your horse plenty of hay.

    I have never given my current horses (a B.S. paint mare and a mini gelding) any psyllium products because I feed plenty of hay- and I have never had a problem with them.

    The ones that I found to work are Sand Clear & also a product, which I think is by Equate, that is called Equi-aide. It is exactly like Sand Clear, but when I last used it, you got more for your money than with the Sand Clear.

    Don't waste your money on SandBlast. Doesn't work and doesn't even have psyllium fiber in it.



  7. #7
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    Default

    Blondy, was that cost comparison done on brand name Metamucil (which here is almost $11 for the small jar), or on a generic? Here, the Walmart label Equate is a bit over $6 for the same size.
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  8. #8
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    Default

    I think the best you can do is to keep them from ingesting sand in the first place, use the psyllium if it's something they tolerate, keep them moving and drinking and digestively "sound" and still there will be disasters and horses that do fine in spite of NO prevention.

    I try to feed all my hay off a surface of gravel. Our soil is SANDY but not sand, so it's not a huge issue here but there is some sand exposure. My trainer feeds the sand-clear the first five days of every month and I usually do the same every two months.

    Without a clear consensus, I figure the psyllium is unlikely to hurt, might help, is cheap and palatable, and I do what I can to keep the sand from going in in the first place.

    Personally I never notice a difference in their poop on the days after I use the sand-clear, although I know people who will swear up and down that the poop is "heavier". I haven't tried to weigh it.
    Click here before you buy.



  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Blondy, was that cost comparison done on brand name Metamucil (which here is almost $11 for the small jar), or on a generic? Here, the Walmart label Equate is a bit over $6 for the same size.
    JB- It really wasn't a "price" comparison, but I know people at the old barn where I board would get it because it is "cheaper than buying a horse grade fiber product."

    If I remember correctly, the dosage of one teaspoon of Sand Clear was at like 141g of fiber and the same exact size dosage of Metamucil (brand name) was 3g of fiber.



  10. #10
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    Default

    Are you sure they're comparing apples to apples? Human nutritional labeling regs are quite different than "feed for animals" ones and the type of fiber labeled may not at all be comparable.
    Click here before you buy.



  11. #11
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    Default

    Yep, that was my point - what was the price comparison for the equivalent amount of fiber.

    You can't go on a serving size of a horse product against a serving size of a human product

    Usually when people use Metamucil/generic, you're talking in terms of 1/2c per day on a regular basis, or 1/2c twice a day for a week as monthly prevention, or something like that.
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  12. #12
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    Default

    Also I'm not sure that the bulk/insoluble fiber in Metamucil is required to be listed as a "nutrient". I'm only guessing (don't have any at hand) that the designated "fiber" on the label of the human stuff is soluble fiber, which is not the bulk-forming part of the product. Hence my wondering whether apples are being compared to apples.
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  13. #13
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    Dec. 11, 2010
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    Default

    My vet says psyllium doesn't work as well.... there are so many studies to back up that it doesn't work very well. I mean 4oz to a 1500lb horse? Um, ok?

    I used to have Terrible sand problems. And I fed 8oz of pysllium for two weeks on, one week off (per vet). And they still had too much. Recently I switched to feeding a couple flakes of grass hay in the evening. Guess what? NO sand in my horse that on the scale of 1-4, (4 being the largest amount of sand) she had a three. I'm sticking to my grass hay!



  14. #14
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    Default

    I am all for getting the horse product- as you get SO much more fiber from that to get the job done than you would a little bit of fiber from a human grade product.

    Here is the info from the posting:

    METAMUCIL:
    Active Ingredient (in each TABLESPOON)
    Psyllium Husk, Approximately 3.4 g
    http://www.metamucil.com/metamucil-orange.php#4

    Now compare that to Sand Clear:
    Ingredients:
    Active Ingredients per 5 ox.:
    Psyllium Husk: 141,270 mg
    http://www.valleyvet.com/ct_library_...ae5&showText=1

    I suck at math so Lucky SC came up with the following math: "141,270 mg = 141.2 g. So about a teaspoon of Sand Clear has as much psyllium husk as a cup of Metamucil. "



  15. #15
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    Nov. 7, 2010
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    Default

    Considering Metamucil is a fiber product and is sold as a fiber product- they are going to list as much fiber on that label as they can.

    I am thinking if you are buying a fiber product to rid your horse of sand, you would want to go with the highest dosage of fiber as possible. After all, this is a horse, which outweighs most people and has a much larger digestive system than ours.

    So, of course, the horse product is going to make the most sense- and financially more cheap. Of course, if you wanted to stick with the dosage of the Metamucil, which in my opinion, would not even touch anything in a horse, that is your choice.

    But clearly, if you want a powerful punch to kick the sand out of there, you are going to need a horse product. Unless of course, you prefer using Metamucil and just upping the dosage to equal that of a horse product- but that would make no sense as it would probably cost 3x more than just buying a horse product in the first place.



  16. #16
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    Default

    I've seen psyllium work countless times on vet appointments. In Colorado sand can be a real problem in areas. When horses have a lot of sand, it can be heard in the gut when doing a physical for springs shots, or b4 sedating for dentals. From the people I have worked with, the vet recomends 1 full cup of psyllium once a day for 3 weeks straight for cases like that. Not once have I ever not seen not work.



  17. #17
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    141 grams IS approximately five ounces, going simply by mass. I still think there is some sort of math problem there with the human labeling. Anyone got some metamucil that could list the actual ingredient list? Because if there's nothing in metamucil but psyllium husk, then I'm still pretty sure the stuff is virtually the same. However, if there are useless fillers in the human stuff, then of course it would not add up.

    Sedating for dentals? Wow, my horses all get done without it. I'd SELL my horses if they couldn't get their dental work done without sedation!
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by deltawave View Post
    Sedating for dentals? Wow, my horses all get done without it. I'd SELL my horses if they couldn't get their dental work done without sedation!
    Maybe you didnt know this but most horses are sedated to do dentals! It is the only way to do a consistently good job, but maybe u dont care!



  19. #19
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    Jan. 7, 2011
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    In Washington with my little quackers
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    Default

    Not to off-track this thread BUT
    Two out of three horses on this farm need sedation for dental work. It has been tried by different vets without drugs with disasterous results for both vet and horse. So for safety and an easy peaceful feeling we say, 'Bring on the drugs!'



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by showhorse89 View Post
    My vet says psyllium doesn't work as well.... there are so many studies to back up that it doesn't work very well. I mean 4oz to a 1500lb horse? Um, ok?
    If you could point me to a study that says it doesn't work - when I've pointed to a few that says it does - I would be very grateful

    Don't underestimate a dosage just because it's small. A couple ounces of oil, just about any kind, can put a shine on a horse

    I used to have Terrible sand problems. And I fed 8oz of pysllium for two weeks on, one week off (per vet). And they still had too much.
    Did you change anything else so that they were not continuing to ingest sand? Did you get a baseline of how much sand they had, and how much after, by doing the stir and sink?

    Recently I switched to feeding a couple flakes of grass hay in the evening. Guess what? NO sand in my horse that on the scale of 1-4, (4 being the largest amount of sand) she had a three. I'm sticking to my grass hay!
    Well sure, hay IS the best remedy. But that isn't enough for some horses who either 1) ingest sand on a too-regular basis, or 2) had too much to begin with.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



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