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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2010
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    on COTH right now, duh!
    Posts
    512

    Default No Climb Fencing. Is it for me?

    Hi All,

    So I have been looking at a smaaaaaaalll property (2.5 acres) that has a small building that could easily be turned into 2 stalls and a tack/feed room. Like the house, and the property itself is easily do-able with the right pasture management: property is flat, has some woods for a make shift xc course, even has a fire pit that I could totally turn into a ditch jump and the price is workable.
    While I would love to have more land I need to get what I can now and I could possibly use this as collateral later on to buy something bigger.
    I am allowed 5 horses on the property as per the township (not that I would but I could) but the place needs to be fenced. So i need to find a fence that won't be an eye sore to my neighbors, will keep my little dogs in and my big dogs from going through, plus keep the ponies in.
    I thought about putting in No Climb with the board on top and running a hot wire 6" out around and maybe a hot tape or rope at the bottom since the dogs like to dig and climb.
    What are your thoughts and experiences with No Climb? Is it economical? Please do tell all.

    Thanks!
    Rachell



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2010
    Posts
    22

    Default

    I spoke with a guy at Redbrand recently and he suggested (basically) that if you have a top line of electric, the board is redundant and expensive to put up and maintain.

    I love no climb. I put some up in the past with 1/2" tape at the top, 6" or so above the woven wire. It looked sharp and was secure. My poor mini ran into it one day but bounced off and had no cuts on his face legs or body.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2011
    Location
    In Washington with my little quackers
    Posts
    501

    Default

    I am by no means a fencing expert. I love hot wire for horses, it keeps them off the fences, which extends fence life. Always a good thing. No climb is excellent for dogs as long as it is high enough that they cant jump over, like my neighbor's border collie has done in the past.

    I think the combination of two is ideal, although no climb can be expensive depending on where you live. If stretched properly it should last a long time, if the horses dont use it for hiney scratching.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2008
    Posts
    732

    Default

    Love it,great fence!I think it looks great with a board run across the top,but a hot wire is wise too.I have this fence and am very happy with it on my tiny property.Keeps the dogs in,horsies safe and goat happy!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
    Posts
    1,911

    Default

    We just put up about 900' of non-climb. It's a good choice to keep dogs in (or _out_, which is why I did it) and it looks nice.

    It's a LOT of work. There are about a million horizontal wires that have to be stripped and wrapped back on themselves every time you start and stop a run. http://www.flickr.com/photos/10803470@N00/5342324933/

    IMO it needs something on the top for visibility, either a board or perhaps tape or vinyl. I'm not turning out at night until I get a top board on mine, you just can't *see* it.
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2000
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    4,247

    Default

    I was just thinking how much I love my non-climb with a brown horse guard tape on top. It has been up for over three years, and it still looks new. I love that I got the 5 foot fence, especially when there is over a foot of snow on the ground.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2004
    Posts
    288

    Default The cons and pros

    Mine liked to rub on it which made it bow out and sag.

    Weeds grow into it

    If you let it sag, they can catch themselves on it - I had one get a wire between his foot and the shoe. They could have ended badly.

    I had a pony spook and jump into the top third. It kinda bent and she ran right up over it. There was a 16ft section she was standing next to - the board had been missing for a while. (oops). Caught her stifle when she flipped onto the other side. You need a sight board at the top and maybe electric mid to top way down so they don't push into it.

    Pros
    your dogs won't get out and it lasts a long time and you won't have to paint or replace a million oak boards like me!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 26, 2003
    Location
    NE FL
    Posts
    6,495

    Default

    We have the Redbrand no climb with a top rail and I'm very happy with it.
    I found that without the top rail it is harder for them to see it. The top of the fence also will get bent and saggy if they scratch their butts on it or whatever, so I would recommend doing top rail. I didn't run any hotwire, but mine don't need it.
    I do have 12 dogs so what we did was secured the Invisible fence wire to the no climb around the perimeter of the property (5 acres) about a foot off the ground. This way it keeps the dogs off the fence so they can't dig, I don't have to worry about a hot wire near the ground for the horses to get hung up in, and it also keeps the dogs from running out of the gate when we open it to come and go. This all works well for us.
    "Perhaps the final test of anybody's love of dogs is their willingness to permit them to make a camping ground of the bed" -Henry T. Merwin



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2005
    Location
    Just east of Short Hill Mtn.
    Posts
    2,696

    Default

    We love our no climb -- we have it for our back yard for the dogs and a perimeter around the barn (three board fencing everywhere else). We used a top rail for visual, and have never needed electric wire as well. We just bought a 200 foot section each month, to lessen the impact to our budget, and installed it over time. Be sure to stretch/pull it well, or it will sag.
    "Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall." - Confucious
    <>< I.I.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2010
    Location
    on COTH right now, duh!
    Posts
    512

    Default Can I have tips for installing it?

    Luckily I have friends with a post driver so I hope to bribe them with wine and meat to help me install gates and posts. While they are pretty fence installing knowledgeable, I am not. I'm used to the plank fencing and that is pretty much a no brainer: drive your posts, line your fence line, start nailing, drink some "adult refreshments" hit your thumb, curse like a drunken sailor, drink more "adult refreshments" etc.
    But if I am going to lay No Climb I'd like to know some real people experience with installing it. So please tell me some tips and what not to do's like I am a 4 year old while I Google installing it.

    Thanks again.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2010
    Location
    on COTH right now, duh!
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    512

    Default Oops forgot to ask ...

    How much did it cost you to install it?
    Did you put anything at the bottom, like a bottom board?


    I have 2.5 acres that luckily for me is pretty square and I'm trying to price it now so I can budget it.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2000
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    4,247

    Default

    I kept calling Red Brand and asking for their help. They also have a guide on -line that is good, once you figure it out, but IMHO, not user friendly.

    I won't say it was easy to install, but I am still married. Not sure if that is a testament to the ease of installation or to the strength of the marriage before we installed the fence.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
    Posts
    1,911

    Default

    Redbrand has installation videos online: http://www.redbrand.com/InstallationVideos/Default.aspx

    Now that you've decided on non-climb, you get to figure out which type and brand! Having just gone through this, I suggest Bekaert's class 3 galvanized fence.

    (Red Brand apparently makes a class 3 non-climb, but I couldn't find it anywhere. And I didn't get good reviews from people who have had Red Brand up for a long time -- probably the class 1 stuff.)

    We ended up with Bekaert ZA, which is not what I asked for, but I sure wasn't going to send it back! It's more brittle than I expected. You get one shot at bending it, if you try to bend it back to try again it will break.

    It was something like $135 for a 100 foot roll, I think that was on sale. This stuff is heavy. I asked for 200' rolls and I'm glad they only had 100' actually. Both due to the weight and because stretching 200' of wire and getting it tight is hard. (We spliced two rolls together for a long run. It wasn't a good idea.)

    As far as pricing, we did 4-5" posts (probably overkill but I do NOT want to do this again anytime soon) every 8 feet. Then 6-7" posts at the corners (3 for each corner) and at the end of each run, with a smaller post running horizontal for a brace. Posts were $7 each, bought in large bundles. You will need bracing wire and fencing staples (we used 1 1/4" and found them in a 20# bucket at Tractor Supply.) If you don't have fencing pliers you'll need those to work with the knots and wraps. A fence stretcher tool will make life easier, though you can make your own, and a come-along to tension it. Good leather gloves and eye protection should round out the supply list, though I'm sure I've forgotten something.
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Posts
    2,640

    Default

    In my area chain link is actually cheaper than no climb. Same guage of wire. 12 1/2. Granted, it is only in 50' sections if I buy & install myself. If I hire out it comes longer rolls.

    Professionally finished off ends in 50' sections sounds great to me! Multi hundred plus foot rolls of no climb to struggle with, & hack into a bunch of different sections just is not singing to me.
    "Police officers are public servants. Not James Bond with a license to kill."



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2000
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    4,247

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wsmoak View Post
    Redbrand has installation videos online: http://www.redbrand.com/InstallationVideos/Default.aspx

    Now that you've decided on non-climb, you get to figure out which type and brand! Having just gone through this, I suggest Bekaert's class 3 galvanized fence.

    (Red Brand apparently makes a class 3 non-climb, but I couldn't find it anywhere. And I didn't get good reviews from people who have had Red Brand up for a long time -- probably the class 1 stuff.)

    We ended up with Bekaert ZA, which is not what I asked for, but I sure wasn't going to send it back! It's more brittle than I expected. You get one shot at bending it, if you try to bend it back to try again it will break.

    It was something like $135 for a 100 foot roll, I think that was on sale. This stuff is heavy. I asked for 200' rolls and I'm glad they only had 100' actually. Both due to the weight and because stretching 200' of wire and getting it tight is hard. (We spliced two rolls together for a long run. It wasn't a good idea.)

    As far as pricing, we did 4-5" posts (probably overkill but I do NOT want to do this again anytime soon) every 8 feet. Then 6-7" posts at the corners (3 for each corner) and at the end of each run, with a smaller post running horizontal for a brace. Posts were $7 each, bought in large bundles. You will need bracing wire and fencing staples (we used 1 1/4" and found them in a 20# bucket at Tractor Supply.) If you don't have fencing pliers you'll need those to work with the knots and wraps. A fence stretcher tool will make life easier, though you can make your own, and a come-along to tension it. Good leather gloves and eye protection should round out the supply list, though I'm sure I've forgotten something.
    Too funny. We had the same experience with wanting 200' and getting the 100.' I would never have been able to handle the 200' roll.

    We got the red brand. I cannot recall the class. I think that we paid more than wsmoak. We used 6" posts and 8" gate posts. We did not do the corners the way that they suggested. No cement. I had a contractor dig the holes for the corners. I live in NE, and there were boulders everywhere. It was not cheap, but it has been very good and reliable. We used a come-along. My farrier loaned us a tool to attach the fence to the come along. You can make one with 2" by 4"s and wing nuts. He also loaned us a tool to bend the ends from the two rolls together. Borrowing those tools made life much easier. Handling the rolls was not easy. I was covered in bruises. Had to wear long sleeves for a few weeks. We had no problems with brittleness or breakage. I have been really happy with the Red Brand and their customer support.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
    Posts
    3,221

    Default

    We installed Red Brand no climb for our dogs. I works great for them. We do not use a top board since I want the fence to be more invisible. If I had diggers I would just run the Invisible Fence on the bottom of the wire fence to keep them away from it.
    For horses I would use the top sight board and electric. I found it easy to install.
    Whenever we have installed it we just end the fencing on a post and then start the next roll right on top of that same post. We have never done the splicing one to another.
    We have used the 200' rolls and they are heavy. We use 2 come-alongs to make sure we get an even pull top & bottom so the whole fence is really tight.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep. 3, 2005
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    433

    Default

    We installed non-climb 12 years ago. Mostly I am happy with it but have learned some things. Horses love to rub on non-climb and will lean over the sight rail to talk to neighbors. Definitely run electric tape above and on both sides (on long insulators) about the middle of the fence height.

    Non-climb offers several cost savings over other fences, one of which is that you can have more than 8 foot on center for your posts - this means saving on the number of posts. However, the longer on center you go, the more sight rail lumber costs per foot. I used galvanized conduit for a sight rail along the top, looks very nice, was much cheaper than wood and allows for more distance on center. We used cable ties to fasten the non-climb to the conduit, ties have to be replaced periodically as the plastic ages and breaks.

    Installation: Non-climb is very hard to stretch in order to end up with a really good looking fence. We used a tractor as an immovable object to pull against, threaded a steel pole vertically through the non-climb, attached the pole to a "come along" with rope that was attached to the tractor and then gradually racheted the fence tight (relatively). It's a difficult and time consuming aspect of this fencing material. The staples used to "nail" the non-climb to the posts will come out if the horses can rub on the fence but will not come out without massive amounts of effort (and a special fencing tool) if you need them out to repair a section. End posts have to be extremely heavy, we used railroad ties, and require angled supports as there is significant horizontal pull when the fence is tight. Splices (attaching one 100 foot section to the next) have tended to come apart. And 100 feet of 5 foot non-climb is extremely heavy and difficult to work with. You really need 3 people to work with it.

    If I had it to do again, I would use 5 foot non-climb (6 foot if have stallions or colts) for only the perimeter fencing with electric tape as described above. For cross fencing, I would use 2 inch electric tape on wood posts (and solar fence chargers). Tape is very easy to maintain, easy to install and relatively inexpensive.

    This combination should keep wanted animals in, unwanted animals out and minimize the total cost.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,195

    Default

    I have it too, and love it. Don't think I can add to the discussion, except to say that we have a pipe gate across our driveway and we put no climb on it so the farm is pretty dog-escape-proof. I *love* the driveway being closed off to dogs (as well as horses).



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2009
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    4,173

    Default

    Used it on a small farmette in a more suburban setting and it was clean, tight, very attractive easy to mow and trim along, we kept it 4 inches off the ground and had no issues with any dogs except at gates.
    Went to gates with built inmesh on bottom panels and installed gate wheels so they opened smoothly.

    Do put the board along the top and hotwire...because if a horse leans over and bends the top or creates a sag the fence is ruined looks like crap and essential is un-fixable.

    The best gauge and galvanized dip you can afford so it doesn't rust and rot.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 23, 2004
    Location
    Camden, De
    Posts
    3,632

    Default

    I went with the no climb with a flex board on top and hot wire on the inside. They don't mess with my fence
    http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4024/...13ed19ceb5.jpg

    The local amish installed and it was pretty darn pricey but it will last forever and I don't have to repair it because the horses stay off of it.



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