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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2010
    Posts
    22

    Default Bringing in a boarder in NC- advice and/or legal issues?

    I am renting a small (11 acre) farm with house and shedrow barn in eastern NC.

    I would like to bring in a boarder with 1-2 horses to do partial self care (Preferably: they do feed / horse check in the morning while I'm still at work. I do evening feed/check, before I go to work.)

    There's no arena but there's plenty of trails and a round pen as well. I would do pasture rotation and some manure management. Boarder would provide their own grain, feed, etc.

    I have no problem doing fly masks, winter blankets, occasional wound care. I'll also be around most days to keep an eye on things.

    One issue, however, is that if they feed Bermuda/Coastal I will not allow it anywhere near my horses and will have to turn out two separate herds. I'd rather just say 'no bermuda allowed, period' though that may cause a lot of people to walk away since it's so common down here. OTOH, maybe it's not worth the headache for $1-200/mo 'income'?

    Is $100/horse/month a good price (I know I haven't given a lot of details. Just in general.)

    Do I need to worry about any special insurance or anything just to have one boarder??

    Are there any good contracts out there specific to NC?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    16,669

    Default

    Yes, you need insurance. Care, custody and control and rider liability. It may very well not be worth it to have a boarder.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 8, 2007
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,230

    Default

    Not sure where in Eastern NC you are, but in and around the triangle, partial self care (or co-op) is around $150, so $100 might be about right.

    I know alot of people who wont let their horses near coastal. Your barn, your rules. Id hate for someone to be in a rush and accidentally throw coastal to all the horses without thinking about it.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2010
    Posts
    22

    Default

    I'm well outside the triangle, not too far from Goldsboro. And I'm glad there's others out there that don't like coastal. Everyone I run into is happy to feed it.

    Also, insurance is a horrible horrible thing... until you need it!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,025

    Default

    Definitely figure out what is important to you and stick to it. Do not switch/compromise your horsekeeping for the sake of $100 or $200 a month. You will find someone who's in agreement with you, making things much smoother.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2003
    Posts
    9,620

    Default

    You absolutely need insurance. And get a quote before you make up your mind. It may not make financial sense if you're hoping to make money.

    And your barn, your rules. If you don't want coastal hay fed because you'll have to separate the horses, then put that in the contract. Make sure they are well aware of that clause, too.

    I know coastal is common in NC, but isn't fescue and orchard grass also pretty readily available? Also, if you are turning the horses out together and feeding hay from separate stashes, there's going to be some mixing (horses eating each other's hay). Be prepared for it to be "unequal" to some extent, which may or may not annoy you or your boarder.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2008
    Posts
    7,220

    Default

    Agree with Phaxxton that you absolutely need insurance, and that if they are going in the same field it is impossible to keep hay separate.

    When I have something that is really important to me, I would rather just provide it myself than start putting clauses in contracts and hoping the boarder complies. So maybe charge a little more and provide hay, but have boarder provide grain? That way you can select the hay yourself and not worry about it.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2003
    Posts
    9,620

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fordtraktor View Post
    When I have something that is really important to me, I would rather just provide it myself than start putting clauses in contracts and hoping the boarder complies. So maybe charge a little more and provide hay, but have boarder provide grain? That way you can select the hay yourself and not worry about it.
    I think this is a good idea, especially if the horses will be turned out together and likely sharing hay piles.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2002
    Location
    where the grass is greener
    Posts
    706

    Default

    Since you're renting the farm, does your contract allow sub-leasing, which is technically what you're doing by taking on a boarder?

    Definitely get insurance - care, custody & control; rider liability.
    Recommend that your boarder get owner's liabilty ins on their own horse in case it does any damage to the property (which you don't own.)

    You'll also need a good boarding contract, rider/owner release agreement (releasing you AND the legal owner of the property). And post any "rules" - i.e. barn hours, no smoking, close gates, etc.

    Are there any liabilty laws on record for your state? If so, post required legal notices at the entrance to the farm.

    Since you're concerned about the type of hay being fed, I'd include hay and up the price to cover it. That way you wont even have to worry about it being on the property.

    I'd calculate the cost of hay for 2 horses, plus the cost of additional insurance. You can then offer a discount to the "right" boarder in exchange for sharing the feeding, blanketing, etc.
    You want to make sure it isn't going to cost you more to have a boarder!
    You're entitled to your own opinion, not your own facts!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2003
    Posts
    9,620

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by baysngreys View Post
    Are there any liabilty laws on record for your state? If so, post required legal notices at the entrance to the farm.
    In NC, yes, And I believe posted signage is a requirement, but I am not positive.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2002
    Location
    where the grass is greener
    Posts
    706

    Default

    Here in SC it's required to post. Even if you don't have boarders, you've got shoer, vet, UPS guy, etc.
    You're entitled to your own opinion, not your own facts!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 22, 2003
    Posts
    9,620

    Default

    Good point. Even if it's not required to post it, it's still a really good idea.



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